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Illinois 
State Normal University 

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Normal 



1897^8 



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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
LIBRARY 

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The person charging this material is re- 
sponsible for its return to the library from 
which it was withdrawn on or before the 
Latest Date stamped below. 

Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books are reasons 
for disciplinary action and may result in dismissal from 
the University. 
To renew call Telephone Center, 333-8400 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



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ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



AND COURSE OF STUDY 



OF 



The Illinois 



State Normal University 



NORMAL, I LLINOIS 



THIRTY-NINTH VEIAR. 



For the Academic Year Ending June 18 
l8p6 a,. 







:- 
'EL 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 

OF THE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 



Hon. WILLIAM H. GREEN, Cairo 

PRESIDENT 

Hon. S. M. INGLIS, Springfield 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBER AND SECRETARY 



ENOCH A. GASTMAN, Esq., Decatur 

CHARLES L. CAPEN, Esq., Bloomington 
EDWARD DOOCY, Esq., Pittsfield 

E. R. E. KIMBROUGH, Esq., Danville 
MATTHEW P. BRADY, Esq., Chicago 
MRS. ELLA F. YOUNG, Chicago 

PELEG R. WALKER, Esq., Rockford 
M. E. PLAIN, Esq , Aurora 

FORREST F. COOK, Esq., Galesburg 
CHARLES I. PARKER, Esq., Chicago 

WILLIAM H. FITZGERALD, Esq., Chicago 
JACOB A. BAILY, Esq., Macomb 

CHARLES S. THORNTON, Esq., Chicago 



3^ 

c 



F. D. MARQUIS, Esq., Bloomington 
TREASURER 



FACULTY 



JOHN W.COOK, A.M., LL.D., PRESIDENT, 
Professor of Mental Science and Didactics. 

henry Mccormick, ph.d., vice-president, 

Professor of History and Geography. 

CHARLES A. McMURRY, Ph.D., 

Supervisor of Practice. 

DUEL P. COLTON, A.M.. 
Professor of Natural Sciences. 

DAVID FELMLEY, A.B., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

C. C. VAN L1EW. PH.D., 
Professor of Reading and Assistant in Didactics. 

O. L. MANCHESTER. A.M.. 
Professor of Ancient and Modern Languages. 

J. ROSE COLBY, PH.D., PRECEPTRESS, 

And Professor of Literature. 

MARY HARTMANN. A.M., 
Assistant in Mathematics. 

CLARISSA E. ELA, 
Teacher of Drawing. 

EVA WILKINS, 
Assistant in History and Geography. 

AMELIA F. LUCAS. 
Assistant in Reading and Teacher of Gymnastics. 

ELIZABETH MAVITY, 
Teacher of Grammar. 

JOSEPH G. BROWN. 
Assistant in Natural Sciences. 

MARY R. POTTER, A.B.. 

Assistant Ancient Languages. 

JOHN A. KEITH. 
Principal of Grammar School. 

LIDA B. McMURRY. 
Assistant Training Teacher, Primary Grades. 

MAUD VALENTINE, 
Assistant Training Teacher. Intermediate Grades. 

KATE MAVITY. 
Assistant Training Teacher, Grammar Grades. 

L. C. HINCKLE. 

CHESTER M. ECHOLS, 

Principals Second Intermediate. 

ERNEST A. THORNHILL, 
Principal First Intermediate. 

NELLIE M. PHILLIPS, 
Principal Second Primary. 

EVA CHISHOLM, 

Principal First Primary. 

ELMER W. CAVINS 
Teacher of Penmanship and orthography. 

A.NGE. V. MILNER. 
Librarian,. 
.-J 



Wlinoie State IRormal Tttnwereity. 



Early History. 

*3"*HE Illinois State Normal University was established by act of 
C$} the Legislature in 1857. The statute providing - for its location 
f; directed the governing; board to solicit bids from competing 
points. Pour cities were especially interested in securing it. 
Bloomington, McLean county, having offered the most favorable in- 
ducements, was selected as the location of the school. In October, 
1857, the school began its sessions in rented rooms in the city of 
Bloomington. In September, I860, it was removed to what was then 
known as North Bloomington, where a commodious building had been 
erected for its accommodation. The suburb of North Bloomington 
subsequently became a separate town under the name of Normal. 
It has a population of about 4,000. It is a very desirable place of resi- 
dence, having those qualities which are especially characteristic of 
school towns. The charter provides that intoxicating liquors shall 
never be sold within the limits of the town. There are no places of 
amusement, nor resorts that are in any respect objectionable. Elec- 
tric cars connect Normal with Bloomington. 



Material Equipment. 

'HE Normal School is comfortably housed in two buildings. The 
Q^ older contains three stories and a basement. It is about 100 by 
|T 160 feet. It is built of brick and cost originally about $120,000. 
The basement contains dressing rooms for gentlemen, the 
chemical laboratory, a room used for clay work, another used for 
gymnastic exercises, and several store-rooms. On the first floor are 
the reading room and library, dressing rooms for ladies, office, a spa- 
cious room for drawing dasses,"and an assembly room and class rooms. 
On the second floor are the normal assembly room, with a seating 
capacity of 376, and eight class rooms each about 30 by 32. On the 
third floor are the museum, physical laboratory, office of the teacher 
of natural sciences, a large assembly hall, and the halls of the two 
literary societies. CX A Q ^J4 



(; Annual Catalogue 

The Training School building is a substantial brick structure of 
two stories and a basement. The basement contains play rooms and 
dry closets. On the first Moor there are five school rooms, each hav- 
ing a seating capacity of forty pupils. There is, beside, a smaller 
room that is used for recitation purposes. On the second floor there 
is a room for the grammar grade, with a seating capacity of 150. In 
addition to this there are eight recitation rooms, each of which is 
sufficiently large to accommodate a class of twenty-five. The pecul- 
iar construction of this part of the building is to be accounted for 
by the fact that it became necessary to secure as many class rooms 
as possible in order to furnish opportunities to a large number of 
pupil teachers to engage in the practice work. 

The two buildings are heated from a commodious boiler house, 
which is equipped with three large boilers. 

A third building, 100 by 125, is now in process of erection. It will 
contain an admirable gymnasium, bath rooms, a bowling alley, library 
room, and science rooms. The cu£ on the fourth cover page show r s 
it as seen from the east. 

The chemical laboratory is well adapted to the needs of the school. 
The physical laboratory is well equipped with apparatus. The museum 
contains a large collection of specinT-ens. The science department is 
furnished with an excellent lantern, and is also supplied with a steam 
pump for the compression of gases. 

There is a valuable reference library of over 9,000 bound volumes 
and 2,000 pamphlets. These books have been carefully selected, and 
there are scarcely any useless volumes in the collection, while new 
and desirable additions are being constantly made. 

Students are allowed the free use of the reading-room, and may 
draw out books without charge. The department is open seven hours 
and a half of every school day, and the librarian and an assistant are 
always in attendance. The privilege of access to the shelves has 
been established and the librarian gives instruction on the use of the 
library, in a set of informal talks. It is the aim of teachers and 
librarian to help the students to cultivate a familiarity with good 
literature and with the use of books, and to give them the best possi- 
ble assistance in doing their reference work. 

There are four excellent literary societies connected with the 
school. 

The campus contains fifty-six acres and affords abundant room for 
tennis and other out-door exercise, when the weather will permit. 



Illinois State Normal University. 7 

The Organization of the School. 

J^^HE institution known as the Normal School contains two depart- 
vO ments: First, the Normal Department; second, the Practice 
f Department. 

No person is admitted to the Normal Department who does not 
sign a declaration of his intentions to teach. Applicants must be 16 
years of age if females, and 17 if males. No charge is made for tui- 
tion except to persons attending from other states, who do not expect 
to teach in Illinois. The membership of this department is usually 
from 500 to 600. Eighty-five counties of Illinois have been represented 
this year. Fourteen teachers are employed in this department. 

The Practice Department is a necessary adjunct of the Normal 
Department. It consists of a school of eight grades, six of which are 
below the grammar grade. The aggregate attendance of the Train- 
ing School is usually about 300. Nine persons are employed in con- 
nection with this school. Four of these devote their time to directing 
the practice work of the Normal pupils; a fifth is principal of the 
Grammar Department. The others act as principals of the primary 
and intermediate rooms. No charge is made for pupils in the primary 
grades. The pupils in the intermediate department pay $15 a year, 
and those in the grammar grades $25. 



flethods of Admission to the Normal School. 

All applicants for admission are required: 

1. To be, if males, not less than 17, and if females, not less than 16 
years of age; 

2. To produce a certificate of good moral character, signed by 
some responsible person; 

3. To sign a declaration of their intentions to devote themselves 
to school teaching in this State as follows: 

"I hereby solemnly declare, that my purpose in attending the 
Normal University is to fit myself for teaching in the schools of Illi- 
nois, and that I will carry out this pledge in good faith; and I do fur- 
ther pledge myself to report to the President of the University, 
semi-annually, where I am and what I am doing, for three years after 
graduating at said institution." 

Tuition is free. 

The following evidences of scholarship will admit applicants to 
the school: 

1. First-grade certificates. 

2. High school or college diplomas. 



8 Annual Catalogue 

3. Certificates of attendance at other State Normal schools or at 
the University of Illinois. 

4. Appointments from County Superintendents. 

5. A satisfactory examination by the faculty. 

An appointment may be secured from the County Superintendent 
by successfully passing an examination about equivalent to that re- 
quired for a second-grade certificate. 

Each county in the State is entitled to appoint two pupils, and 
each representative district is entitled to appoint, in addition, as 
many pupils as there are members in the General Assembly from that 
district. Single counties constituting a senatorial district are, there- 
fore, entitled to six pupils: senatorial districts comprising two coun- 
ties, to eight pupils; those comprising three, to ten pupils: and so 
following. In districts composed of two or more counties, Superin- 
tendents desiring to appoint more than two candidates should confer 
with the other Superintendents in the district for an allotment of 
the appointments. 

If applicants have none of the papers mentioned they are exam- 
ined in Reading, Arithmetic, Geography, English Grammar, United 
States History, and Orthography. If found competent the}- will be 
admitted to all of the privileges of the institution. 

There are three courses of study: 

a. The regular English course of three years. 

h. The classical course of four years. 

c. The two years' course for graduates of accredited high schools. 

Pupils are expected to take the regular work of the school. Ex- 
ception is sometimes made, but each case is passed upon individually. 
College graduates will receive special privileges in the choice of 
studies, and will be graduated by special arrangements. 

Any teacher in the State is welcome to come here at any time, to 
remain as long as he pleases, to visit any of the classes and labora- 
tories, and to observe any of our work — all without enrollment or re- 
sponsibility. 

Anyone desiring to complete the course in less than the usual 
time will be offered examination in any of the studies. A residence 
of at least one year is required for graduation. Pupils are not per- 
mitted to select studies at pleasure unless they possess special quali- 
fications. 

Those desiring to work exclusively in our Practice Department 
will be afforded abundant opportunity to do so if found prepared. 

No person will be entitled to graduate who does not make the 
required standing in each study of the course— either by work in the 
class-room, or by examination, as described above. Any person is en- 
titled t<> our diploma who shall have completed our required Course 



Illinois State Normal University. 9 

of Study, without regard to the time he may have spent here; pro- 
vided, that his residence shall not be less than one year, and that 
his deportment and character shall be satisfactory to the faculty. 

We transfer to our books no marks of standing- from other insti- 
tutions, but work done in other State Normal Schools and at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois will be accepted in lieu of work required here. 

New students are received at the beginning- of every term. It is 
important that they should be present on the first day of the term, as 
the reg-ular recitations invariably beg-in on the second day. Failure 
to be present on the first day does not debar one from the privilege of 
joining- the school; but every day of delay in entering greatly increases 
the difficulties of the beginner's work. 



Expenses. 

The following estimate of necessary expenses is approximately 
correct : 

NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

Tuition Free 

Board, 39 weeks $110 to $156 

Washing 15 to 25 

Books and stationery 10 to 15 

Total $135 to $196 

Good rooms and excellent boarding places are abundant. Arrange- 
ments can be made after arriving here better than by letter. 

Students are advised to bring with them such books as they may 
have, but not to purchase others until they arrive at the University. 
Students arriving on the I. C. and C. & A. railroads should come to 
Normal station ; those arriving by other roads can reach Normal 
from Bloomington by street cars. In no case is the hiring of a car- 
riage necessary. 

General Statements. 

Thorough discipline is enforced in every department. 

A certificate is granted for the successful completion of one year's 
work, and another for that of two years. 

New students will receive a hearty welcome to the Young Men's 
and Young Women's Christian Associations of Normal. These organ- 
izations are vigorous and active, and seek earnestly to promote the 
spiritual welfare of the students. 

The Museum and the room for microscopic work are in the Uni- 
versity building, and to these the students of the University have 
access under certain restrictions. 

There is no boarding house connected with the institution. 



]0 Animal ( 'atdlogue 

Analysis of Course of Study. 

RE A DING. — First Term. 
The Work— Webster's Phonetic Chart. 

1. A thorough mastery of the forty-four elementary sounds and 
the phonetic values of the various diacritical markings in words and 
syllables. 

2. Rapid oral practice upon lists of selected syllables. 

The purpose of the above drill is to enable the students to recog- 
nize instantly the values of diacritical markings. 

3. Twenty principles of pronunciation are learned and their ap- 
plication observed in -the oral phonic analysis of about seven hundred 
words, selected from the vocabulary of ordinary conversation. 

4. Daily piactice in oral reading. Selections: (a) Which arouse 
the pupil mentally and physically, thus cultivating an animated ren- 
dering; (6) which stimulate the emotional nature, and create a desire 
to make thought effective, thus stimulating to a clear and distinct 
presentation of the thought, and an attractive and unconscious bear- 
ing; (c) which require sudden transitions from one emotional state to 
another, thus cultivating flexibility and naturalness of expression. 

5. Practice in reading second and third grade matter receives 
some attention. In this work students are required to illustrate vari- 
ous methods of leading the reader to the correct expression, without 
employing the principle of imitation. 

READING.— Second Term. 
Two plays of Shakespeare form the text of the term's work. The 
following plays are used: Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Henry VIII., Mer- 
chant of Venice, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Kenry IV. Part I.— 
In this work special stress is laid upon the natural but expressive and 
forcible rendering of the thought. All of the time that can be spared 
from the thought analysis is devoted to practice and drill in oral read- 
ing. In the thought study some collateral reading is required on each 
play. At least one commentary is read, and, if the play is historical, 
the history to which the play relates is read. From one to two hun- 
dred lines in each play are memorized. The methods of teaching 
reading in the lower grades are discussed in a series of lessons upon 
that subject. 

A RITH M ETIC. — First Term . 
Topics. 

I. Oral Analysis of Problems from Stoddard's Intellectual Arithmetic, 

four weeks. The special p'urpose of this work is to secure precision 

of thought and expression. Attention is called to the nature of arith- 

iim-1 Leal reasoning, the use- of the syllogism and enthymeme. The Ian- 



Illinois State Normal University. 11 

guage of the analysis must be derived from the operations with 
objects. 

II. Primary Arithmetic, four weeks. — (a) Purpose- -To outline a 
course in number for the first four years, and develop and illustrate 
the principles and methods of instruction, {b) Topics: 1. The logical 
order of number knowledge. 2. The use of counters, cards, and other' 
aids in teaching number facts to 10, in developing the decimal system, 
in teaching the fundamental operations in written arithmetic. 3. Oral 
language: Forms of description and analysis appropriate to the sev- 
eral stages. 4. Forms of written work. 5. Number stories and drill 
exercises. The proper use of a primary text-book. 

III. Factoring, Fractions, etc., seven weeks. — (a) Purpose. — 1. To or- 
ganize the student's knowledge of Arithmetic by deriving all number- 
relations and processes from the simple idea of addition, and the 
grouping of numbers in the decimal system. 2. To suggest methods 
and devices for teaching the several topics, (b) Method. Fundamental 
principle —every process in Arithmetic should be learned as a rational 
process; i. e., an operation with numbers of things. From concrete 
examples, there should be a conscious generalization of the process in 
the form of a rule; finally, long-continued drill until the process with 
the mere symbols becomes mechanical. Accordingly what can be done 
with integers is first learned with splints, grouped into bundles in ac- 
cordance with the laws of the decimal system. Fractions are inves- 
tigated by folding and cutting paper circles and paper squares. The 
oral description and written representation of the operations thus 
discovered are succeeding stages, (c) Topics. 1. Notation — Laws of 
the decimal system and the Arabic notation; comparison with sys- 
tems of different radix'. 2. Fundamental rules— contracted methods. 
3. Factoring— principles of factoring; demonstration of tests of divis- 
ibility: greatest common factor; least common multiple. 4. Cancel- 
lation and straight-line analysis. 5. Fractions — the fractional unit: 
the functions of the denominator; illustration and demonstration of 
the six principles upon which the various operations depend. Ordinary 
text-book topics in fractions. In these the central thought is that 
operations with fractions are fundamentally the same as operations 
with integers, the only difference arising from the different way of 
representing the unit. 6. Decimal Fractions— the peculiar notation; 
reading and writing pure and complex decimals; reduction of common 
fractions to decimals; repetends and their simpler laws; effects of 
moving the decimal point; limits of accuracy in multiplication and 
division. Oughtred's Contracted Methods. 



12 Annual Catalogue 

Second Term. 
Topics. 

I. Weights and Measures, three weeks. — Purpose— 1. To interest the 
student in the derivation and meaning of our standards, the history 
of the calendar and kindred topics. 2. To inform the student in regard 
to the conditions that obtain in problems in carpeting, papering, plas- 
tering, land and lumber measure, fencing, the measurement of bins. 
tanks, and cisterns, and other practical problems. Topics: 1. Tables 
of length, weight, value, etc. 2. The various problems in reduction of 
compound numbers. 3. Addition, subtraction, etc. I. The interval 
between two dates. 5. Changing from one system to another. 6. The 
metric system. 7. Longitude and Time: Construction of comparison 
table, local and standard time, the international date line. 

II. Square and Cube Root, two weeks. — Process is derived from the 
geometrical applications; i. e., finding the side of square, or edge of 
cube, whose area, or volume, is known. 

III. Mensuration, two weeks. — Rules of Mensuration are derived 
from some sort of analysis of the forms measured : thus the ratio of 
the circumference of a circle to its diameter is approximated by 
measuring carefully several cylindrical bodies and averaging quo- 
tients obtained by dividing each circumference by its diameter. The 
various plane figures and solids are treated in the following order: 
Rectangle, rhomboid, triangle, trapezoid, circle, ring : rectangular 
prism, cylinder, triangular pyramid, cone, sphere, shell, frustum. 

IV. Percentage, five weeks. Method. — The same forms of analysis 
are used as in common fractions. The three fundamental cases are 
carefully studied, and their applications shown in Profit and Loss, 
Commission, Stocks, Insurance, Taxes, Interest, Discount, and Ex- 
change. In these applications, emphasis is laid on the nature of the 
business, to which percentage is applied. The number-work becomes 
subordinate. 

ALGEBRA.— First Year, Third Term. 

I. Algebraic Notation — Fundamental operations. — Especial attention 
is given to the reading of algebraic expressions, the discussion of defi- 
nitions, positive and negative numbers, and the derivation of the laws 
of the fundamental operations. Processes and principles are arrived 
at by deduction from definitions, rather than by generalization from 
particular instances. 

I I. Factoring and Fractions. — These subjects are treated with more 
thoroughness than in any of our elementary text-books. The method 
applicable to each class of problems in factoring, is formulated in a 
rule, describing the case and the mode of discovering the factors. 



Illinois State Normal School. 13 

III. Simple and Frational Equations — Problems. — The significance 
of the several transformations of equations. How to state a problem. 

Second Year, First Term. 
Comparison of the various modes of Elimination. Involution and 
Evolution. Development of the theory of exponents, Quadratic Equa- 
tions. Especial attention is given to the language of Algebra. Read- 
ing of Algebraic expressions in unambiguous phrases ; accuracy in 
describing and relating algebraic processes and in stating principles 
established. Rigorous demonstrations are combined with the induc- 
tive method. 

GEOMETRY.— Second Term, Third Term. 
The course extends over two terms of twelve weeks each, and in- 
cludes the ordinary High School course, in plane, solid, and spherical 
Geometry. Wells's Geometry is the text. About one-third of the time 
is devoted to original exercises. Special attention is directed to the 
mechanism of deductive reasoning, the earlier demonstrations being 
developed in complete syllogisms. The several stages of a demon- 
stration are seen and strict conformity to the type required. Review 
exercises include classifications of the established truths of the sci- 
ence and schemes for tracing proofs to the original definitions and 
axioms upon which they rest. Forms of geometrical notation are dis- 
cussed and considerable practice is given in brief forms of written 
work. Two main ends are kept in view: to equip the student with the 
forms of deductive reasoning, and to make the study a drill in precise 
thinking and accurate, perspicuous expression. 

BOOKKEEPING.- Six weeks. 
The course includes six typical sets in Single and Double entry, 
with a few leading topics in Business Arithmetic and Commercial 
Law. 

SCHOOL LAW.-^fe weeks. 
The text used is Bateman's Decisions. The course is especially to 
instruct in the legal duties and powers of teachers as defined in stat- 
utes and judicial decisions. Other topics discussed are, History of 
Public Education in Illinois, The School Funds, The Various Units of 
School Administration, School Officers— Their Powers and Duties. 

GEOGRAPHY.— Introduction. 

What Geography is. Is it a science? What is a science? What 
Geography is based on. The contents of Geography. The "cement" 
which holds the geographical concepts in their proper place. Why 



Illinois State Normal University. 15 

Geography should be taught. 1. For the mental discipline that may 
be obtained from it: its value in cultivating - the perceptive powers, 
the memory, the representative and reflective powers. 2. Geography 
should be taught for the knowledge it contains. 3. As a basis for the 
study of other subjects. 4. For its value in connection with commerce. 
5. For its refining influence. 

Geography can be taught scientifically; the topics can be so ar- 
ranged as to show the relation of cause and effect. The analytic and 
synthetic methods of teaching with the advantages and disadvantages 
of each. Geography is a study of the earth, of forms of land and water, 
etc., and not of symbols, simply. The proper use of maps, pictures, 
sand-modeling, etc., in teaching Geography. The making of correct 
mental pictures lies at the base of all true study of Geography. The 
pictures of remote regions must be made from Geographical concepts 
acquired in the home neighborhood; hence the importance of home 
geography. 

Topics in preparing for Geography. Since the making of correct 
mental pictures lies at the base of all true study of Geography, it fol- 
lows that the ideas of Position, Direction, Distance, Surface, Form, 
and Color should be among the first presented to the children, as they 
are essential in the making of pictures. Manner of presentation in 
each instance. Map representation, with the idea of scale; purposes 
of map representation; map of school-room floor: map of the school 
yard and vicinity. Study of the land and water forms in the home 
neighborhood. Slopes, Divides, or Watersheds; Lines of Union of 
slopes, or valleys. Study of the home stream; situation with refer- 
ence lo slopes; dependence of streams upon slopes; study of source, 
banks, bed, mouth, tributaries. Pond, lake. Oral descriptions of large 
streams and lakes visited by the teacher. Sand modeling, purpose, 
advantage. Climate: why summer is warmer than winter. The at- 
mosphere; effect of heat and cold on the atmosphere. Evaporation, 
Condensation: rain, hail, snow, frost, dew, fog. Circulation of the 
water: history from leaving the ocean until its return; show how it 
benefits man. Study of vegetation of home neighborhood; why? Kinds, 
uses. Study of animals of home neighborhood; why? Kinds, habits, 
how beneficial to man. Minerals; kinds, uses, mines, miners. Races 
of men; white, black, yellow, brown; homes of different races, cus- 
toms, manners, occupations, education, religion, government. Home 
town: shape, size, surface, drainage, climate, crops, animals, manu- 
factures, railroads, notions of commerce, exports, and imports; causal 
relations dwelt upon. Home county as above: county seat; notions of 
government, in the home, in the school, in the community, in the 
county. Home state as above: capital, shape, surface, principal riv- 



16 Annual Catalogue 

ers, direction of rivers determined by surface, principal crops, princi- 
pal varieties of trees, uses; animals, benefits to man. Principal cities 
with reason for the selection made; why the principal cities are bo 
located; principal manufactures in those cities; commerce, showing 
chief exports and imports. 

Intermediate Grade. How to teach shape of the earth: motions 
of the earth with their consequences. Importance of their being able 
to read a map right; Geography is a study of things: forms on the 
map are symbols, and stand for things; the things themselves should 
be studied as far as possible; relation of the symbol to the thing. 
Value of pictures in teaching geography; teacher should make collec- 
tion of geographical pictures; where such pictures c;.n be obtained. 
Use of the stereoscope in teaching Geography. To distinguish be- 
tween land and water as represented on a map. Study of the hemi- 
spheres, noting differences and resemblances, and giving reason for 
names. Study of the continents; number; comparative size: differ- 
ences and resemblances, main purpose, to fix in the mind a picture of 
their forms and relative positions. Study of principal bodies of water, 
oceans, seas, gulfs, etc., noting their forms, and positions relative to 
the continents and to each other. Plan for the study of a continent, 
fitted to home continent. Purpose of plan, to show sequence of topics 
in scientific teaching of Geography; the sequence should show the 
relation of cause and effect; the following sequence suggested: Posi- 
tion, comparative size, shape, outline, surface, drainage, climate, 
vegetation, animals, man and bis occupations, minerals, political 
divisions, cities, railroads, etc. Elementary Physical Geography 
should always come first in the study of the continent, country, state, 
etc., as it is the more concrete, and consequently the more interest- 
ing: the Political Geography should come later, as it is more abstract, 
and is largely determined by the Physical Geography. Study of the 
United States; follow plan for study of a continent. Sand model- 
ing; model different forms of land and water; advantages of sand 
modeling; abuses. Review work on home state. Study of other states 
and territories. Follow the natural features, such as watersheds, 
river basins, etc., as far as possible, forming mental pictures, and 
representing these pictures in maps with crayon or pencil, and in the 
sand. Free use of chalk and sand. Relation of Geography to Botany, 
Zoology, etc. 

Intelligent study of History based largely on Geography. Geog- 
raphy and Literature. Study of chief cities, determining reason for 
their location, principal industries, and prosperity. Study of the 
principal railroads, showing their importance, reason for their loca- 
tion, their influence on the country through which they pass; influ- 



Illinois State Normal University. 17 

ence of the country upon railroads. Review government of home 
state: study government of the United States, briefly. Study produc- 
tions, manufacturers, commerce, minerals. Difference of chief crops ? 
minerals, manufactures, etc., of different sections, with reasons for 
difference, as far as possible. 

GRAMMAR GRADES.— Astronomical Geography. 

Definition of terms. Shape of the earth: proofs of its rotundity; 
proofs of its oblateness. 

Motions of the earth and their consequences; rotation on axis; 
day and night; axis; poles; equator; parallels: meridians: latitude; 
longitude: zenith; nadir; vertical line of observer; horizon; revolution 
around the sun; earth's orbit; plane of earth's orbit. 

Declination of earth's axis; relation of declination of axis to posi- 
tion of the tropics; polar circles, and width of zones; relation to circle 
of light, diurnal circle, change of seasons, and to difference in length 
of days. Tests. Study of South America. Position, size, shape, con- 
tour, relief, drainage, climate; effects of altitude upon climate: prin- 
cipal trees, plants, crops; principal animals (wild and domestic): 
inhabitants, with brief treatment of their origin, customs, homes, 
governments, etc. Sketch principal river systems. Study the differ- 
ent countries, with their capitals and a few other leading cities. 
What render the cities important. What the continent produces for 
exportation. What it imports. Relation of production and commerce 
to climate. 

Great Britain and Ireland. Close relation of the United States 
and Great Britain. Importance of the kingdom; small in area, but 
great in power and wealth. Outline; surface; principal rivers; cli- 
mate; crops; manufactures; commerce. Principal cities noted for 
manufactures; for commerce; as educational centers; centers of his- 
torical interest; connected with famous literary works. Reasons for 
more manufactures in some localities than others. Tracing cause 
and effect as far as possible. Sketch maps of important localities. 

Continental Europe. Position; ragged outline: importance of 
study of outline, or contour; benefits arising from irregular coastline; 
surface; influence of surface upon climate, crops, and manufactures; 
drainage; influence of surface upon drainage; principal river systems 
sketched; climate; crops; dependence of crops upon climate. Study 
of different countries; comparative importance of each; in what re- 
spect important; productions, such as minerals, crops, domestic 
animals, and manufactures. Principal cities; for what noted, manu- 
factures, commerce, schools, and historical events. Governments, 
customs, homes, etc. 

—2 



18 Annual ( 'atalogtu 

Asia. Outline: relief: backbone of Asia-Europe; drainage (prin- 
cipal rivers only); climate, effect of great plateaus and high mountan 
barriers upon climate and vegetation, and consequently upon civili- 
zation: great forests: great deserts; great plains. Study different 
countries, briefly: their principal productions: commercial importance: 
leading cities, principal exports, imports. The people: their govern- 
ment: religion: homes: customs: food: education, etc. Make sketch- 
maps. 

Africa and Oceanica. Studied after the same general plan as 
Asia, but more briefly, excepting Australia, which, because of its 
importance, is studied somewhat carefully. 

Much map sketching and sand-modeling throughout the entire 
course, and constant effort to get pupils to think of forms of real 
land and water, 'nstead of being satisfied with thinking of symbols, 
simply. 

PHYSfCAL GEOGRAPHY. 

What Geography should mean: Comparative Physical Geog- 
raphy; physical life of the globe: nature of this life; how it differs 
from organic life. 

Anatomy of the globe;-importance of forms of contour and relief, 
and of relative position: importance shown by giving illustrations in- 
dicating their influence upon climate, vegetation, animal life and in- 
dustries, and upon civilization, in general. Analogies of the general 
forms of the continents; Guyot's seven laws of relief: value of the 
laws. Distribution of the plains, plateaus, and mountains in the dif- 
ferent continents. Volcanoes: their cause; position: linear arrange- 
ment. Theory of earthquakes: history and description of a few of 
the principal ones. Contour and depths of the oceans. 

Physiology of the continental forms: Law of the development of 
life: this law in accord with Laplace's theory of the development of 
the earth; also with the evolution of human society. Three epochs 
of development: the insular, the maritime, and the continental. The 
formula of development the same for each continent, the entire globe, 
and for vegetable and animal life. A few lessons on elementary geol- 
ogy; formation of coal; glacial epochs, etc. 

Three grand contrasts: Contrast of continental and sea climates. 
Reasons for difference; results of difference as revealed in the animal 
and vegetable kingdoms. The atmosphere; composition; weight: the 
mediator between the continents and the oceans; the bond of society: 
genera] theory of the winds; the trade winds; monsoons; hurricanes; 
cyclones; etc. Transportation of the waters from the oceans to the 
interior of the continents, and their return to the oceans; the winds, 
the water carriers: influence of mountains on distribution of rains; on 



Illinois State Normal University. 19 

position of deserts; fertile plains; etc. The tides: cause; benefits. 
Ocean currents; cause; effect on climate; etc. 

Contrast of the Old World and the New: Description of each; one 
the complement of the other; good results of a union of the two. 

Contrast of the three continents of the North and the three of 
the South: Consequences of the proximity of the northern conti- 
nents, as seen in the vegetation and animals: consequences of the iso- 
lation of the southern continents. 

Increase of life from the poles to the equator; man an exception: 
law of the distribution of the human races; geographical center of 
mankind; advantage of the temperate climate for the improvement 
of man. The continents on the north the theater of history; conflict 
between the regions north and south of the line of highest elevation 
in Asia-Europe; result of the conflict as shown by history. 

Contrast of the East and West; different forms of civilization 
largely due to ^ -^graphical environment. The geographical march 
of history; close relation between this march and the geographical 
features of the globe. Numerous illustrations. 



UNITED STATES HISTORY. 
Professional. — Attention called to the material to be used, and to 
the manner of presenting it to pupils of the lower grades. 
Primary Grade.— Material. 1. Fairy Tales. 

2. Bible stories. — (a) Characters of whose childhood and youth 
most is knows: Joseph: Moses; Samuel: David: Jesus: etc. (b) Abraham: 
Jacob; Daniel; Paul; etc. 

3. Stories of adventure.— 1. Those that occurred near home: 
(a) experience of hunters; fishermen: travelers, (b) Dangers from 
floods; deep snows; high winds; prairie fires; etc. 2. Those that oc- 
curred remote from home. On the railroads: in stages: on steam- 
boats; etc. 

4. Stories about Indians— Their dress; homes: canoes: hunting ex- 
peditions; war expeditions; cruelty to prisoners: sports of the chil- 
dren, etc. 

5. Explanation of national holidays— Fourth of July; Decoration 
Day; Thanksgiving Day; Washington's birthday. 

6. Biographies— Washington; Columbus: Lincoln: Grant; Sher- 
man; Sheridan, etc. 

Method of Presentation,— 1. At first, the teacher must tell the stories. 
The children must not be expected to repeat them. 2. Later on, the 
teacher may read some of the stories, although it is better to tell them, 
and the children should be expected to reproduce them in their own 



20 Annual Catalogue 

language; orally at first, later in writing. The .stories can be made 
the texts for the work in language. 

Purpose of the Work. — 1. To awaken a historical spirit. 2. To culti- 
vate the imagination. 3. To aid in character building. 

Tnti r mediate Grades. — Material. Biographies. 

Discoveries. — Columbus; the Cabots: Americus Vespucci; ("artier: 
Hudson. 

Explorers.— De Soto; Champlain; La Salle; John Smith; Lewis and 
Clarke; John C. Fremont. 

Colonizers. — Raleigh; Roger Williams; Lord Baltimore; William 
Penn; Oglethorpe. 

Pioneers and Indian Fighters.— Miles Standish; Daniel Boone: 
"Kit" Carson. 

Statesmen. —Benjamin Franklin; Thomas Jefferson; Alexander 
Hamilton; Daniel Webster; Henry Clay; Abraham Lincoln. 

Generals.— Washington; Greene; Scott: Grant; Sherman; Sheridan. 

Naval Officers. —Isaac Hull; Decatur; Perry; Farragut. 

Inventors. — Whitney, Fulton; Morse; McCormick; Howe, etc. 

History of Typical Colonies. — Plymouth; New York; Rhode Island: 
Maryland; Pennsylvania: Georgia. 

Social condition of the people at different periods. — Troubles 
with the Indians; Manner of Living: Homes; clothing; customs; social 
usages. 

Wars. — King Philip's War. French and Indian War; Ticonderoga; 
Quebec. Revolutionary War: Bunker Hill; Valley Forge; Yorktown. 
War of 1812: Lundy'sLane; NewOrleans. Mexican War: Buena Vista; 
< Vrro Gordo. The Civil War: Fort Sumter; Merrimac and Monitor; 
Malvern Hill; Gettysburg; Vicksburg; The Wilderness; Surrender of 
Lee. 

Method. — A text-book may be used, but better results will be ob- 
tained without, if the teacher be prepared. The narrative form should 
be preserved throughout. There should be a vivid picturing of men 
and events. Pictures and brief historical poems will add much to the 
interest and value of the work. 

Grammar Grades. — Material: 1. A good text-book on the subject. 
2. One or two histories of the United States, more extended than the 
text, for reference. 3. A few historical novels noted for the vivid- 
ness and truthfulness of their descriptions. 4. Collection of poems 
founded on incidents in American history. 

Method. -Frequent reference should be made to the work in the 
preceding grades. The narrative form should still be used. Atten- 
tion should be given to the causes which led to important results. 



Illinois State Normal University. 21 

The virtues of the people should be pointed out. Their resistance to 
oppression, their sacrifices for the right, and their moderation in vic- 
tory, should be commended. Throughout the entire work, the patri- 
otism of the fathers should be held up for the emulation of their 
sons, and the truth should be emphasized that there can be no true 
freedom where there is not a cheerful obedience to law. 

Academic. — Condition of Europe at time of discovery of America. 
1. Granada conquered by Ferdinand and Isabella. 2. The "War of 
the Roses," in England, closed shortly before by the battle of Bos- 
worth. 3. Eve of the Reformation. 4. Sad condition of the common 
people. 

Claims of the Northmen considered. 

Columbus. — Youth; manhood: seeking" for aid; aid obtained; the 
first voyage; land discovered; return to Spain; reception at Barcelona; 
effect of discovery on Europe; other voyages; results; old age; misfor- 
tunes; injustice; death-. 

Other Spanish discoverers and explorers. 

English discoverers and explorers — The Cabots; Drake; John 
Smith, etc. 

French discoverers and explorers — Verrazzani: Cartier; Cham- 
plain; LaSalle; Marquette; the Jesuit Fathers. 

Dutch discoverers. 

Colonization — Spain in the south; England in the center; France 
in the north, south, and west. 

Growth of the colonies— English colonies surpass the others in 
wealth and numbers. 

Troubles — Between English and Spanish colonies. Between Eng- 
lish and French colonies. Nearly all of these troubles grow out of the 
troubles in Europe. 

French and Indian War — Cause; principal events; results; train- 
ing school for Revolutionary War. 

Internal troubles of English colonies — Indians; religious troubles; 
local jealousies. 

Life in the colonies— Religion; education; homes; dress; customs; 
industries; mode of travel; social usages; growth in wealth and pop- 
ulation. 

Revolutionary War — Remote causes; immediate causes; principal 
events; principal actors; self-control of the people; respect for law. 

"The Building of the Nation" — Articles of Confederation; their 
insufficiency; danger of disintegration; making the Constitution: the 
Constitution contrasted with the Articles of Confederation. 

Growth of the Nation. — The president; financial policy fixed: in- 
ternal troubles, foreign policy fixed; troubles with France; troubles 
with Barbary States; troubles with England. 



22 Annual ( 'atalogue 

War of 1812.— Causes; principal events; results. 

Admission of States. 

Inventions. 

Railroads. 

Development of material resources. 

Slavery. — Introduction; legislation affecting slavery. 

Mexican War. — Cause; principal events; results, acquisition of 
territory; discovery of gold in California; results of the discovery. 

The Civil War.— Causes; principal events; results; abolition of 
slavery: the "New South." 

History of the Nation Since the Civil War.— Admission of States; 
political parties; political policies; labor movements; progress in the 
arts and sciences; achievements in literature: study of political and 
domestic economy; general prosperity. 

CIVIL GOVERNMENT. 

Man, a social being; society, the natural state in which to live; 
hence the necessity of government; right of society to govern its in- 
dividual members; the object. Government in the family; in the 
school; its purpose, nature, and necessity. 

Town Government.— Review system of United States land survey. 
Distinction between a town and a township; the civil town; character 
of its government; departments; officers constituting each depart- 
ment; manner of election; the Australian ballot system; term of 
office; duties; pay; town meeting; time; business; antiquity of town- 
ship government: origin and history of the New England township. 
Pure democracy. 

( 'ounty Government.— Departments; officers constituting each: 
manner of election: time; duties: the county board; meetings: pow- 
ers:- relation of the county to the state; origin of the county; histoid 
of the New England and Virginia county. Representative democracy. 

State Government. — Historical sketch of Illinois; the Northwest 
Territory: ordinance of 1787: influence on the history of the State; 
Illinois as a Territory; admission as a State: legal boundaries; three 
constitutions; government provided for by the constitution of 1870; 
relation of constitution to constitution of the United states. Legis- 
late e department: legal title: senatorial districts; advantage of two 
houses; members in each house: qualifications; pay; officers of each 
house: powers and privileges of members; duties and obligations; 
minority representative plan: advantages claimed. Executive depart- 
ment : consists of what officers; qualification of each; time and manner 
of election; duties: term of office; pay; responsibility. Judicial de- 
partment; consist s of what courts: jurisdiction of each; original and 



Illinois State Normal University. 23 

appellate jurisdiction; judicial districts and circuits; judges of each; 
juries: grand and petit; duties. State boards; duties; state institu- 
tions, name, location, purpose, support, and government. How taxes 
are levied for state, county, town, and district purposes; equalization 
of taxes. Duties of the citizen to the State; duties of the State to 
the citizen. 

Government of the United States. Thorough review of United 
States History as a basis for the work. Government of the colonies; 
relation of the colonies to each other and to England; the Rev- 
olutionary War: Declaration of Independence; Articles of Confed- 
eration: need of a stronger bond: steps leading to formation of 
constitution; advantages over the articles: opposition: ratification; ori- 
gin of American political parties. Legislative department: compare 
with British parliament; how each house is constituted, qualifica- 
tions, election, term, pay, privileges, and obligation of members: 
when Congress convenes; life of one Congress; number of sessions: 
manner of transacting business; committees, journals, etc.: power 
of Congress in regard to tax:s; how the government is supported: pur- 
poses of tariff: history of the tariff legislation: commerce: naturali- 
zation; bankruptcy: money: financial doctrines: banking systems: 
postal matters; patents; copyright: piracy: war; armies: militia; 
Territories; immigration: the writ of I tabeas corpus; bills of attainder; 
ex post facto laws; a study of English history bearing on these facts; 
titles of nobility; prohibitions on the states; rights of the states; 
implied powers of Congress. Executive department; power vested in 
whom; ability to execute the laws: qualification of the President; 
manner of nominating and electing the President: his term of office: 
pay; the Cabinet: responsibility; comparison with English and French 
cabinets; functions of the different departments; principal bureaus 
in each; civil-service reform. Judicial department; consists of what 
courts; appointment of judges; tenure of office; comparison with 
state judiciary; advantages and disadvantages of each system: ne- 
cessity of Federal courts: danger of clashing with state courts. 
Amendments; purpose; further safeguards around the rights of indi- 
viduals; religious liberty; freedom of speech and of the press: right 
of petition; to bear arms; to be secure in person and papers: trial 
by jury; abolition of slavery; civil rights; impartiality in the elective 
franchise. 

ANCIENT HISTORY. 
What history is; what it treats of; sources, ''monuments, relics, 
and records;" aids to history — ethnology, archeology; philology. Di- 
visions of history; history a continuous whole. Races of mankind; 
the historic race; its divisions. Geographical sketch of the ancient 



24 Ammal Catalogue 

oriental nations; historical darkness in Northern Asia; twilight in 
Central Asia; sunlight in Western Asia. 

Hindoostan. The Aryans; early home: migration; plains of the 
Indus and Ganges: conquest of non-Aryans: caste; purpose: effect; re- 
ligion; sacred books: arts; sciences. 

China. The Turanians; early home; migration: conquests: Con- 
fucius; education; civil service; non-intercourse; effect on civilization: 
present condition: the Chinese in the United States. 

Egypt. Geography; influence of the Nile: reason for rise of the 
Nile; brief histories of the dynasties; the pyramid builders: Shepherd 
kings; the Hebrews in Egypt; Seti: Rameses II; Necho; Conquest by 
the Persians; Greeks; the Ptolemies; Cleopatra: conquest by Rome; 
religion; tombs; Sphinxes: arts; sciences. Supplementary reading: 
Wilkinson's "Ancient Egyptians;'' Eber's "Uarda," and Shakespeare's 
'•Anthony and Cleopatra." 

Chaldaea. Description of Tigro-Euphrates basin: the Hamites; 
Semites; civilization; education; books and libraries: religion: arts; 
science. Supplementary reading: Bible history and the ''Builders of 
Babel." 

Assyria. Chaldaean Colony; growth; power: Sargon; Sennacherib: 
intercourse with the Hebrews; civilization: arts: sciences: Nineveh. 
Bible history; Byron's "Destruction of Sennacherib." 

Babylonia. Overthrow of Assyrian power; Nebuchadnezzar: De- 
struction of Tyre: captivity of the Jews; Splendor, strength and 
downfall of Babylon; Cyrus the Great; modern researches. Supple- 
mentary reading: Bible history; Rawlinson's "Six Great Monarchies 
of the Ancient Eastern World." 

The Hebrews. Semites; importance in historv; our indebtedness 
to them; their origin; Abraham; Jacob; Joseph: Moses; the Exodus: 
Judges: kings; captivity; destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans; 
present condition. 

Phoenicia. Geography; government; Tyre and Sidon: colonizers; 
commerce: alphabet; diffusers of civilization. 

Persia. Geography; Medes and Persians; Aryans; Astyages: Cy- 
rus: ( 'ambyses; Darius I.; revolt of the Asiatic Ionians; Marathon; 
Xerxes: etc.: Alexander the Great; government; religion: arts: 
sciences. 

Greece. Geography, in full; influence of its geography on its his- 
tory. People; legendary age, a shadowy period; the Heroes. Argo- 
nautic expedition; twelve labors of Hercules; Golden fleece; Trojan 
War; modern explorations of Schliemann. Religion: the twelve great 
deities: minor deities; character of gods; improvement on eastern 
gods: Elysian fields: oracles; sacred games; influence of games on civ- 
ilization; Amphictyonic council; sacred wars. Government: kings; 



Illinois State Normal University. 25 

Oligarchies; Archons; Tyrants. Sparta: classes; Lycurgus; govern- 
ment; lands; money; occu lations; institutions; education; Messenian 
wars; Tyrteus. Athens: Codrus; Draco; Solon; Public Assembly: ex- 
pulsion of Tyrants; CHsthenes; ostracism. Wars with Persia; Mara- 
thon. (Read account of battle in Creasy's Fifteen Decisive Battles). 
Aristides; Themistocles: Thermopylae: value of Thermopylae to us^ 
Athens destroyed; Sal amis (Read Byron's poem: The Isles of Greece); 
Plataea; treachery of Pausanius; memorials: trophies. Rebuilding 
the walls of Athens; jealousy of Sparta; Confederacy of Delos; effect 
on Athens; "Age of Pericles 1 '; strength and weakness of Athens. Pe- 
loponnesian War; cause; character; principal events: pestilence in 
Athens; Peace of Nicias; Alcibiades: Sicily; defeat; close of the war; 
effect on Athens. Spartan supremacy; abuse of power; Theban Su- 
premacy; Epaminondas; Leuctra; Mantinea. The Ten Thousand; 
Cyrus; Clearchus; Cunaxa; Xenophon; the retreat. Macedonian su- 
premacy; character of Macedonians; Philip; effort of Demosthenes; 
Chaeronea; Alexander; Wars in the North; Issus; Thebes; Invasion of 
Asia; Granicus; Tyre; Egypt; Alexandria; Arbela; Babylon, etc.; Bac- 
tria; India; down the Indus; desert of Gedrosia; Babylon; death; burial: 
influence of conquests; division of empire; history of each division. 
Arts and sciences. Architecture; sculpture; painting; poetry; great 
poets; great epic; compare with English and Italian epics: lyrics; com- 
pare with English lyrics; drama and great dramatists; compare with 
English drama; history and historians; orators and oratory: compare 
with Webster, Pitt, etc. Philosophy and philosophers: comparison of 
deductive and inductive reasoning; the Stoics; Epicureans: influence 
of Greek philosophy on modern thought. Mathematics; astronomy; 
geography; social life; education; position of women: theatrical en- 
tertainments; banquets; Symposia; slavery; homes; domestic economy. 
The Greeks, the schoolmasters of the world. 

Rome. — Geography of Italy; people; beginnnings of Rome; 
legends; the kings; expulsion of the kings; efforts to regain power 
(Read Macau'ay's "Horatius"). Religion; comparison with religion 
of the Greeks; Lares and Penates. Social classes; names of Romans. 
The Republic; officers; senate; first session of the Plebs; cause; re- 
sults; Coriolanus (Read Shakespeare's "Coriolanus"); Cincinnatus; 
"The Cincinnatus of the West;" the Decemvirs; their work; miscon- 
duct (Read Macaulay's "Virginia"); overthrow; Military Tribunes; 
Censors; destruction of Rome by the Gauls; Rome rebuilt: death of 
Manlius; laws of Licinius Stolo; effect on Rome; Samnite wars; re- 
volt of the Latin cities; war with Pyrrhus; cause; events; results; 
First Punic War; Rome and Carthage compared; cause of war; Sicily; 
Rome builds fleets; Regulus; close of war. Second Punic War; Han- 
nibal; Spain; Saguntum; the Alps; Ticinus; Trebia; Trasimenus; 



2(> Annual Catalogue 

Fabius the delayer; the American Fabius; Cannae; Capua: Metaurus 
(Read account of battle in Creasey's "Fifteen Decisive Battles''): 
Zama; close of the war: results. Third Punic War; cause: Masinissa: 
perfidy of Rome; defense of Carthage; destruction. War with Mace- 
don; conquest of Greece; destruction of Corinth: compare with des- 
structionof Carthage and Numanti. The Servile War; cause: results: 
public lands; the Gracchi; fate. Jugurthine war; bribery; Marius; 
Suila. The Cimbri and Teutones: destruction of the barbarians. The 
Social War; cause; results. The Civil War; Mithridates: conflict be- 
tween Marius and Sulla; flight of Marius; return; ferocity: death; re- 
turn of Sulla; proscriptions; death. Pompey the Great in Spain: the 
Gladiators; defeat; destruction; Ferres in Sicily; conquest of Pirates 
by Pompey; Mithridates; description of Roman triumph: Catiline: 
Cicero. The First Triumvirate; Duumvirate; rivalry: Caesar in Gaul; 
Great Britain; the Rubicon; flight of Pompey; Pharsalus; death of 
Pompey; Caesar in Egypt; Pontus; Thapsus; death of Caesar; funeral 
oration; fate of the conspirators; Caesar as a Statesman (Read Shake- 
speare's "Julius Caesar"). The Second Triumvirate: Antony and 
Cleopatra; Antony and Octavius; Actium: founding of the Empire: 
Augustus. Rome, the law giver of the world. 

MEDIEVAL HISTORY. 

Rome under Augustus; boundaries of the empire: nature of the 
government; public buildings; education; literature; social conditions: 
the birth of Christ. Tiberius; the crucifixion of Christ. Nero; Ves- 
pasian; the taking of Jerusalem; Titus: the destruction of Hercula- 
neum and Pompeii; Trajan; the Antonines; Diocletian; persecution of 
the Christians; Constantine the Great; Christianity favored; Constan- 
tinople; Julian the apostate. 

The Goths; Theodosius; Alaric: Attila and the Huns; Genseric and 
the Vandals; fall of the western Roman Empire: influence of the fall 
upon the history of the world. Clovis and the Franks; other Teutonic 
tribes; conversion; monasticism; fusion of the Latin and Teutonic 
peoples; the three elements of civilization. 

Mohammed and the Saracens; conquests, east, west, and north; 
contact with the eastern Roman Empire; conquest of Spain; invasion 
of France; battle of Tours; result. The Crusades; cause; history: re- 
sults: influence on civilization. Charlemagne; dominion; purpose: 
achievements. The Northmen and their aggressions. Rise of the 
Papal power: mission of Rome; the great schism; the iconoclasts; 
feudalism; chivalry. 

The Celts in Britain; the Romans; the Saxons: rivalry between 
the < eltic and the Roman church; the Heptarchy; the Danes; Alfred 



Illinois State Normal University. 27 

the Great; Dunstan; Edward the Confessor: the Norman conquest; 
influence of the conquest upon the history of England; conflict of 
kings and the church; Thomas a Becket; conquest of Ireland; Magna 
Charta; first parliament: wars with the French; wars with Scotland: 
War of the Roses; the Tudors: Henry VIII and the Reformation; 
Mary I; Elizabeth; literature of the period; the Spanish Armada. The 
Stuarts; James I, and the colonization of America; trouble with the 
Puritans; war between Charles I and parliament; Cromwell: the res- 
toration; the Revolution of 1689; cause: result: effect upon American 
colonies. 

Prance; Germany; Spain: Italy: Luther and the Reformation in 
Germany: Loyola and the Jesuits. Rise and growth of the Ottoman 
Empire; invasion of the eastern Roman Empire; downfall of Constan- 
tinople; influence of fall upon Europe. Growth of cities; conflict be- 
tween cities and nobility. Printing. Discovery of America. 

DRAWING. — Two Fears, Two Lessons Per Week. 

1. Aim—1. To teach Drawing as a language. 2. To lead pupils 
to seek culture from the beautiful in nature and art. 3. To promote 
mental development. 

2. General Points.— 1. Drawing a language. 2. Drawing based 
upon form study. 3. Three divisions of drawing as to use: Drawing 
showing construction. Drawing showing appearance. Drawing of 
the enrichment or decoration. 4. An object may be pictured by 
representing its outline, its light and shade, or its color. 

3. Form Study.— In clay. (a) Natural objects: Fruits, leaves, 
vegetables, (b) Geometric Forms: Sphere, cube, cylinder. 

4. Drawing. -Suggestions for movement and position. Geometric 
views. Construction drawing. 

Color — 1. Source of color. 2. Use of color. 3. Effect of color. 4. 
Theory of 'Color. 5. Color harmony, (i. Drawing in color: 1. From 
nature. 2. From common objects. 

DRAWING.— Second Year. 

History. Architecture. Ornament. 

Ancient Period. — Egyptian school. Greek school. Roman school. 

Mediceval Period.— Byzantine school. Saracenic school. Gothic 
school. 

Modern — Renaissance. 

Pupils make drawings of the characteristic elements of construc- 
tion and ornamentation. 

Light and shade (with pencil). From cast. From nature. From 
common objects. From models. 



28 Annual Catalogue 

Illustrative drawing. From nature; cast; copy. This work is an 
effort to acquire skill in rapid illustrative work, and the material is 
gathered from any source. 

PENMANSHIP. 

Outline of work. 

Aim. — I. To fix clearly in the minds of the pupils the following 
fundamental ideas. 1. To write well requires a correct conception of 
what is to be written. 2. Ability to execute that conception with 
pen, pencil, or crayon. 3. This ability must be gained through care- 
ful practice, for it is an acquired habit, and habit comes from repeti- 
tion. 4. The practice must be careful, else, instead of eliminating, 
the pupil will only be confirming a faulty habit. 5. It requires but 
little time to acquire a correct mental picture of a letter compared 
with the time acquired to train the muscles to make it rapidl}' and 
easily. Hence, by far, the greater share of the time should be de- 
voted to training the muscles. 6. Movement is the mainspring of any 
good writing system, and the muscular movement is by all authorities 
conceded to be the best. 7. To improve writing, we must improve 
our habits of making the individual letters. To do this, the best way 
is to repeat the same letter in an exercise with constant effort at im- 
provement. 

II. To make the transition — for with most pupils it is a transi- 
tion—to muscular movement, and give as much drill as the time 
will permit in movement exercises for the purpose of securing control 
of this movement. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING. 
The object of the work: 

1. To secure health by means of exercises, which, (a) raise the 
vital organs to their proper altitude; (b) relieve friction in the ar- 
ticulations and stimulate the vital organs; (c) increase the strength 
of the torso, while developing the extremities; (d) develop the rela- 
lation between the muscles. 

2. To make of the body a perfect servant of the mind, by secur- 
ing: (a) normal bearing; (b) freedom and grace of movement; (c) 
self-command: (d) the proper relation between body and mind. The 
exercises are: 

First Group, (a) Exercise to obtain erect position; (b) poising: 
1. Forward. 2. Backward. 3. Up. 4. Down. 

Second Group. Movements for freeing musrles of the (a) hips- 
(b) sides: (c) chest; (<l) waist: (e) neck; (/) wrists: (g) knees. 

Third Group, (a) Inhaling: I. Without arm movement. 2. With 
arm movement, (b) Bending: I. Forward. 2. backward. 3. Later- 



Illinois State Normal University. 29 

ally. 4. Diagonally forward. 5. Diagonally backward, (c) Twisting- 
body: 1. Around the left to back. 2. Around the right to back, {d) 
Reaching. 1. Laterally. 2. Diagonally forward. 3. Diagonally back- 
ward. 

Fourth Group. Arm movements; with instructions in walking, 
marching, running, and jumping. 

Advanced Work. 1. Responsive work. 2. Pantomime. 

VOCAL MUSIC. 

1. Methods of instruction in elements of vocal music. 

2. Practice in reading in five keys. 

3. Philosophy of transposition. 

4. Choral practice. 

GRAMMAR. 

Relation of thought to language. Nature of a thought and a sen- 
tence. Simple, complex, and compound thoughts and a coriesponding 
form of sentences. Classification of sentences on the basis relation 
of speaker to listener. Simple, complex, and compound ideas neces- 
sitating words and phrases. The clause, and the thought form that 
gives rise to it. Principle and subordinate ideas in the thought and 
the modified and modifying elements in the sentence. Objects, attri- 
butes, and relations, ideas of them, and the language forms expressing 
these ideas. Nature of each part of speech. Analysis of some short 
classical selection. Constant drill in application. Method of induc- 
tion followed, the laws being the outcome of the direct examination 
of numbers of all varieties of thought and language forms discussed. 
The last three weeks of the term are devoted to a discussion of the 
necessary incidental work and of how to select, arrange, and present 
the language work proper to the primary grades. 

Third Term. Etymology. Each part of speech discussed fully. 
Double nature and function of words. Modification within the word. 
English idioms, their growth from natural expressions and their ele- 
ments. A thorough study of a standard selection from the standpoint 
of grammar. A term essay on some grammatical subject. 

The last three weeks are given to a discussion of method in lan- 
uage work in the intermediate and grammar grade. 

OUTLINE OP WORK IN RHETORIC, 

1. Principles controling the Choice of Words. 

2. The Nature and Structure of the Sentence. 

3. The Nature and Structure of the Paragraph. 



3 ) A nnual Catalogue. 

4. The Whole Composition: The choice of subject, Plan, Develop- 
ment. 

5. Processes of Composition: Description, Narration, Exposition, 
Argumentation. 

An effort is made to awaken the critical instinct in the hope of 
securing" three ends: A purer diction of speech; a greater enjoyment 
of good English in books; and an appreciation of the fundamental 
qualities of good composition, — unity, directness, clearness, and sim- 
plicity. Constant practice is given in working out special problems 
of composition. 

LITERATURE. 

The work in Literature runs through three terms, one of which is 
given up wholly to Shakespeare. Twenty-seven weeks are left, there- 
fore, for the study of the whole body of English literature. Very 
little of this time can be spared for the study of mere literary history. 
A text-book, either Stopford Brooke's Primer of English Literature, 
or Shaw's New History of English and American Literature, revised 
edition, is put into the hands of pupils to be used for reference, and 
the library is freely drawn upon for the same purpose. 

We prefer to the historical hand-book the careful study of a few 
authors in their best works. The works thus studied are chosen for typ- 
ical excellence, that is, as well representing the author himself, his 
period, and a type of literature. Through the study of these works 
we seek acquaintance with individual authors, with literary forms, 
and with the relation of literature to life. Some change is made 
from year to year in the authors and works chosen, but every year we 
make a study of the drama, the epic, the narrative poem, or minor 
epic, various minor poetic forms, the essay, the novel, and the argu- 
mentative speech. 

During the year 1895-96 the works studied have been (a) Beowulf, 
in Hall's translation; (b) Chaucer: The Prologue, and The Knight's 
Tale: (c) Shakespeare: Macbeth, King Lear, Hamlet, Othello, The 
First Part of King Henry the Eourth, and A Midsummer Night's 
Dream: Milton: Paradise Lost, Books I— II; Burke: On Conciliation 
with America: Wordsworth: Selected Poems: Tennyson: The Princess; 
George Eliot: Silas Marner; Matthew Arnold: Sohrab and Rustum; 
Emerson: The American Scholar, Self-Reliance, and Compensation. 
Of these works, those by Chaucer, Milton, Wordsworth, George Eliot, 
and Matthew Arnold, together with three of the plays from Shake- 
speare, have received detailed study in the class-room. The others 
have .ill been read by all the members of the class; four critical 
essays have been prepared upon them by each member of the class. 



Illinois State Normal University. 31 

and have been presented before the class, where they have formed the 
basis of discussion lasting several days. 

SHAKESPEARE. 

1. Plays read: Macbeth, King Lear, Hamlet, Othello, The First 
Part of King Henry the Fourth, and A Midsummer Night's Dream. 

2. Object sought: An intelligent reading of dramatic literature. 

3. Points emphasized: 1. The Drama is Literature, not Philoso- 
phy, not Ethics, not History; yet, the Drama is philosophical, ethical, 
historical. 2. Whatever philosophical, ethical, or historical lessons 
the drama has to teach, these lessons are best reached through a. sym- 
pathetic study of the drama as Literary Form. Therefore, in the first 
dramas read we follow closely the Dramatic Construction, observing 
the Induction of the action, the Development, the Climax, the Evolu- 
tion, and the Catastrophe. 

4. Along with Dramatic Construction, and belonging to it, we 
study Characterization; Dramatic Motives; Dramatic Dialogue; Solilo- 
quy; Sequence of Scenes and Actions; Dramatic Illusion; Dramatic 
Times; Tragic Retribution; Differences between Tragedy and Comedy. 
After the class has become somewhat accustomed to following the 
dramatic development of an action, less close attention is paid to this 
in class, and we proceed at once to the characterization and motiving, 
and the consideration of the play as a revelation of life. 

5. Macbeth, Lear, and Hamlet were read in the class-room and 
discussed at length. Macbeth is then studied, somewhat less closely, 
but with care. The others are read in private by all the members of 
the class; essays are then prepared by all; two or three of these essays 
are read in class and form the basis of a general discussion lasting 
two or three days for each play. In all this work, the student is urged 
to postpone the reading of commentators until he has studied the 
plays themselves, and begun, at least, to form his own judgments. 
Independence of opinion, and a willingness to hold the judgment in 
suspense and wait for further light are always encouraged. 



32 Annual Catalogue 



Course in Natural Sciences. 



ZOOLOGY. 

1. Collection of Insects; Study of Insects; Principles of Classifica- 
tion developed by comparing and contrasting several kinds of Insects. 
2. The Crayfish, studied alive and then dissected (type of Crustacea). 3. 
External characteristics of Birds. Analysis of Birds( Jordan's Manual). 
4. Study of the following animals alive; dissection as types: (a) Earth" 
worm (Vermes); (b) Clam (Molluska); (c) Perch (Pisces); (d) Frog 
(Batrachia); (e) Snake (Reptilia); (/) Pigeon (Aves): (g) Rabbit 
(Mammalia). 5. Study of live Hydra. 6. Study of a few Protozoa. 
7. Study of Starfish and Sea-urchin (alcholic). 

Drawings and descriptions of animals studied preserved in perma- 
nent note-book. 

Text-books: Packard; Colton's Practical Zoology. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

1. Muscle. (1) Experiments on the Muscles in our bodies. (2) 
Models of Human Muscles. (3) Dissection of hind leg of rabbit. (4) 
Structure of Muscle, (a) gross; (b) minute. (5) Action of muscle (ex- 
periment on frog's muscle). (6) Training of Muscles (symmetrical 
development). 

2. Bone. (1) Bones as levers. (2) Bones as protectors (brain and 
spinal cord). (3) Bone structure, (a) gross; (6) microscopic. (4) 
Joints, (a) Dissection of joints of rabbit's leg, and beef joints. 

3. General Functions of the Nervous System, Sensation, and Mo- 
tion. 1. Experiments on frog, reflex action of the Spinal Cord. 2. 
Dissection of Spinal Cord and Brain of cat. 3. Voluntary Motion. 4. 
Sensation of Touch. 

4. Circulation. 1. External indications of the Circulation of 
Blood: Heart beat, pulse, blushing, pallor, experiments on veins, etc. 

(a) Microscopic Examination of frog's blood, (b) Circulation of blood 
in web of frog's foot under microscope. 2. Internal proofs of the Cir- 
culation of the Blood: (a) Dissection of heart and lungs (sheep or 
pig), (b) demonstrative of the action of the heart, (c) injection of 
arteries, {d) tracing injected arteries and veins. 3. Description of 
Organs of Circulation and their action, (a) Action of frog's heart, 

(b) action of the heart, (c) experiments illustrating the action of the 



Illinois State Normal University. 33 

large arteries, (d) action of the Medium-sized arteries (plain muscle 
liber), (e) veins (valves). 4. Blood and Lymph, (a) Microscopic ex- 
amination of drop of blood from linger, (6) composition of blood, (c) 
coagulation of blood, (d) injection of thoracic duct (lymph). 5. 
Hygiene of Circulation. 

5. Respiration. 1. Organs of respiration. 2. Mechanical process 
of respiration. 3. Experiments illustrating respiration. 4. Capacity 
of the lungs. 5. Composition of air. 6. Experiments illustrating the 
chemistry of respiration. 7. Experiments showing the differences 
between inspired and expired air. 8. Production of heat and motion 
in the body. 9. Comparison of the human body and a locomotive. 
10. Hygiene of respiration. 

6. Excretion. 1. The Skin. Functions: (a) Excretory, (6) heat- 
regulating, (c) protective, (d) sensory, (e) absoptive. 2. The Kidneys, 
(a) dissection of pig's or sheep's kidneys, (h) action of the kidneys, 
(c) relation of the lungs, kidneys, and skin. 

7. Digestion. 1. Foods and cooking. 2. Dissection of the digestive 
organs of a cat. 3. Study of cross and longitudinal sections of 
teeth. 4. The salivary glands. 5. Experiments with artificial di- 
gestion. 6. Absorption. 7. Hygiene of digestion. 8. Taking "cold," 
diarrhoea, bathing. 

8. The Nervous System. Functions of the Brain and Spinal Cord. 
Hygiene of the Nervous System. 

9. The special senses. Sight, (a) dissection of the eye, (b) ex- 
periments on accommodation, (c) experiments on blind spots, (d) 
experiments on color contrast, (e) experiments on adaptation to 
amount of light. Defects in vision. Hygiene of the Eyes. Smell 
and Taste. Hearing. The voice and speech. Dissections of the 
Larynx. 

Drawings and descriptions of dissections made into books. 
Text-book: Martin's Human Body (briefer course). 

BOTANY. 

1. Planting seeds (corn and beans); their structure and growth. 
2. Buds, structure, protection, arrangements, kinds, growth. 3. Study 
of early flowers, Hepatica, Spring Beauty, Trillium, Blood-root, etc. 
Study of Types: 4. Green slime (Protophyta). 5. Moss (Bryophyta). 
6. Fern and Horsetail (Pteridophyta). 7. Scotch Pine and Austrian 
Pine (Gymnosperms). 8. Common flowering plants (Anglosperms). 

Herbarium required. Notes and drawings of plants studied. 

Text-book: Gray's School and Field Book. 



-3 



34 Annual Catalogue 

PHYSICS.— First Term. 

The following' is a list of the exercises which are worked out 
experimentally by the student, and recorded in a note-book. This la- 
boratory work is preceded by the study of a manual and by prelimin- 
ary directions by the instructor, and is followed by the study of a 
text-book. Recitations are upon both experimental work and text. 

1. Mensuration. — 1. Length in metric units. 2. Relation between 
circumference and diameter of a circle. 3. Volume of an irregular 
body. 4. Cross-section and diameter of a tube. 5. Weight of a cubic 
centimeter of water. 6. Weight of a dollar and a dime. 

,.\ Density and Specific Gravity, Including Mechanics of Fluids. — 1. De- 
termination of density of a solid. 2. Specific gravity of a liquid by 
specific gravity bottle. 3. Weight lost by a body immersed in liquid. 

4. Specific gravity by immersion. 5. Floating bodies. 6. Liquid pres- 
sure due to weight. 7. Pressure on bottom of vessel. 8. Specific 
gravity of liquid by balancing columns. 9. Comparison of gases and 
liquids. 10. Measure atmospheric pressure— barometer. 11. Specific 
gravity of liquids by balancing against the atmospheric pressure. 
12. Boyle's law. 13. The siphon. 14. The "Hero's fountain." 

3. Mechanics of Solids, Dynamics. — 1. Action of a force upon a body. 
2. Thefjrce of friction. 3. Composition of forces. 4. Parallel forces. 

5. Action and reaction. 6. Comparison of masses by inertia. 7. Ac- 
celerated motion. 8. Pendulum. 9. Levers. 10. Pulley. 11. Inclined 
plane. 12. Wedge and screw. 13. Tenacity. 14. Elasticity. 

k. Heat. — 1. Effect of heat upon size. 2. How heat travels. 3. Test- 
ing thermometers. 4. Temperature and physical form. 5. Laws of 
cooling. 6. Melting and boiling points. 7. Heat capacity. 8. Deter- 
mination of specific heat. 9. Latent heat. 10. Coefficient of linear 
expansion. 11. Coefficient of expansion of gas. 12. Coefficient of ex- 
pansion of a liquid. 13. Absorption and radiation. 14. Solution. 

Second Term. 

5. Magnetism. — 1. General study of a magnet. 2. Action of at- 
tracted body on magnet. 3. Mutual action of two magnets. 4. In- 
duced magnetism and breaking magnets. 5. Law of induced magnets. 
<i. Lines of magnetic force. 7. Terrestrial magnetism. 8. Theory of 
magnetization. 

(>. Static Electricity. — 1. Mutual action of electrified bodies. 2. The 
pith-ball electroscope. 3. Transferring electrification. 4. Induced 
electrification. ;"3. Law of induction. 6. Charging by conduction. 
7. Charging by induction. 8. The electrophorus. 9. The electrical 
machine. I". The condenser and Leyden jar. 11. Electromotive force 
;iml resistance. 



Illinois State Normal University. 35 

7. Current Electricity . — 1. Production of current by chemical action. 

2. Conditions for producing- current. 3. Action of currents on mag- 
nets. 4. Conditions affecting - resistance. 5. Effect of series and par- 
allel resistances. 6. Methods of connecting- cells. 7. Resistance 
measured by substitution. 8. Resistance measured by Wheatstone 
Bridge. 9. Electro-magnetism. 10. Induced currents. 11. The dy- 
namo and motor. 12. The induction coil and telephone. 

S. Light. — 1. How lig-ht spreads from a center. 2. Intensity. 

3. Shadows. 4. Images through small aperture. 5. Reflection from 
plane mirrors. 6. Curved mirrors. 7. Images from plane and curved 
mirrors 8. Refraction and total reflection. 9. Refraction by lenses. 
10. Images from lenses. 11. The spectrum by dispersion. 

9. Sound. — 1. Vibrat07-y and wave motion. 2. The vibration of 
strings. 3. Speed of sound waves. 4. Reinforcement. 5. Interfer- 
ence. 

Manual— Allen. Text— Avery. 

CHEMISTRY.— Third Term. 

The course consists of a systematic study of the most common 
elements and compounds, and the development of the laws and the- 
ories of chemistry. Students follow the direction of the text in doing 
work in the laboratory, and recite upon this experimental work. All 
processes, laws, and theories are illustrated and verified by experi- 
ment. Careful records of all work are kept in permanent notebooks. 
Reactions are shown by diagrams and equations. 

1. Elements and Compounds. — Iron, oxygen, iron oxide, phosphorus, 
phosphorus oxide, mercury, mercury oxide, carbon, carbon- monoxide, 
carbon dioxide, hydrogen, water, sulphur, sulphur oxides, sulphurous 
acid, sulphuric acid, phosphoric acid, carbonic acid, zinc, zinc 
oxide, iron sulphide, hydrogen sulphide, iron sulphate, copper, cop- 
per oxide, magnesium, magnesium oxide, magnesium sulphate, cal- 
cium, calcium oxide (quick lime), calcium hydroxide (slaked lime), 
calcium sulphate (gypsum and plaster of Paris), calcium carbonate 
(marble or chalk), sodium, sodium oxide, sodium hydroxide, sodium 
sulphate, sodium carbonate (sal soda), sodium amalgam, chlorine, 
hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride (salt), calcium chloride, potas- 
sium, potassium oxide, potassium hydroxide, potassium sulphate, 
nitrogen, nitrogen oxides, nitric acid, potassium nitrate (niter or 
saltpeter), ammonia, ammonium hydroxide, ammonium chloride, am- 
monium sulphate, ammonium nitrate. 

2 Processes, Laws, and Theories. — Analysis, synthesis, oxidation, re- 
duction, allotropy, crystallization, reaction, metalhesis, deliquescence, 
efflorescence, neutralization, relation of acids, bases and salts, law of 



3(5 Annual Catalogue 

Boyle, law of Dalton (or Charles), law of conservation of mass, 
atomic theory, law of definite proportions by weight, law of multiple 
proportions, Prout's hypothesis, law of definite proportions by vol- 
ume (Gay-Lussac), molecular theory, hypothesis of Avogadro (or 
Ampere), theory of Dulong and Petit, periodic law (Mendeleeff). 
Text— White. 

ELEMENTS OP PEDAGOGY.— First Fear, First Tain. Two Hours 

a Week. 

The purpose of this work is the introduction of those who have 
just entered the Normal School to the subject of Pedagogy. The stage 
of their professional scholarship necessitates the selection of subject 
matter that shall be simple and interesting. The course begins with 
two introductory lessons in which an attempt is made to show in what 
especial fields their study will lie, the way in which the child has been 
regarded, generally, in the older systems of education, and a few defi- 
nitions which are intended to set certain limits to the work of the 
term. 

Following these lessons come discussions of the general equipment 
of the average child when he enters school, the discipline through 
which he has acquired the equipment, the general principle of apper- 
ception, and the modern movement in child-study with its relation to 
the work of the teacher. 

In order to make clear the successive steps by which modern edu- 
cational ideas have made a place for themselves, the study of educa- 
tional reformers occupies the remainder of the term. 

Beginning with the Revival of Learning, the educational ideals 
are carefully examined and their peculiar forms explained. The trans- 
formations of these ideals through the work of the reformers are 
studied and the contributions of Comenius, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, and 
Froebel are especially noted. The Orbis Pictus, Emile, and Leonard 
and Gertrnde are examined and commented upon quite fully. 

The i hought movement for the term is the introduction of the idea 
of sense training by Comenius, and its historical development by the 
later reformers. 

PEDAGOGY.— First Year, Second Term. 

CHAPTER I. 

The work opens with Special Method in History and Literature 
for the eight grades, [t is the object of this work to discuss and 
illustrate the principles underlying the arrangement of a complete 
course in I tistory and Literature for the eight grades and the method 
of presenting such materia] to a class. Sometime is spent in becom- 



Illinois State Normal University. 37 

ing- acquainted with stories from history and literature that are suit- 
able for children, as a basis for more intelligent discussion of their 
educative value. The teacher needs to be acquainted with many of 
the classic fairy stories, such as those prepared by Scudder, or the 
Grimm brothers; he should be familiar with the story of Robinson 
Crusoe, with many of the classic myths of the Orient, and the Pioneer 
History Stories of America. 

This preliminary work is followed by a discussion of the text of 
McMurry's ''Special Method in History and Literature." 

1. Introduction: The relation of Literature, as the great ethical 
power in culture, to the main aim of education, character-building", 
to the cultivation of the child's aesthetic tastes, his sympathies, and 
powers of thought. Duty of the school in bringing the influence of 
literature to bear upon the masses. Relation of school to home. 

2. Fairy Tales in First Grade: Sympathy between child and fairy 
tale. Popular objections to fairy stories. Their validity. The five 
requirements of a classic fairy story. The oral presentation of the 
fairy stories and their reproduction by the children. Relation of the 
stories to the other work of the first year, e. g., as furnishing- suggest- 
ive materials for drawing and language and as cultivating the power 
of oral speech. Relation of stories to first work in teaching reading - . 
Discussion of the methods of teaching" reading to beginners. 

3. Robinson Crusoe in the Second Grade: History of the story of 
Robinson Crusoe. Comparison with the Fairy Tales. Discussion of 
the moral, industrial, and economic value of the story. Relation 
of the story to the other work of the second year, especially to nature 
study, drawing, modeling, and language. Method of presentation 
suitable to the story of Robinson. 

4. Myths in the Fourth Grade: Definition of the myth. Distin- 
guished from the legend and history. How valued by literary artists. 
The characteristics of the my ths and their value to the child culture. 
Methods in teaching- the myths. 

5. Pioneer History Stories in the Fourth and Fifth Grades: Tran- 
sition from the mythical to the historical hero. Child's interest in 
attractive biography. Lists of Pioneer History Stories suited to the 
Fourth and Fifth Grades. Character of the early pioneers of America. 
The value of oral presentation in -history; method of oral presentation; 
reproduction of the stories by the pupil; difficulties in adopting- an 
oral presentation of history stories. 

History in the Seventh, Eighth, and Ninth Grades: Full and de- 
tailed treatment of typical periods. Use of the biographical element. 
Arrangement of topics and relation of the history to the other work 
of these grades. 



38 Annual Catalogue 

CHAPTER II. 

The last month of the term is devoted to a discussion of Dr. Mc- 
Murry's "Special Method in Geography." The object of this work is 
to discuss and illustrate the principles underlying the proper selec- 
tion and treatment of the materials for instruction. 

1. Home Geography in the Third Grade: Discussion of the mate- 
rials as follows: 1. Food products and occupations connected with 
them. 2. Building materials and related trades. 3. Clothing, materi- 
als used, manufacture, etc. 4. Local commerce, bridges, roads, rail- 
roads. 5. Local surface features, streams, hills, woods, etc. 6. Town 
and county government, court house, etc. 7. Climate and seasons, 
sun, wind, storm, heat. Value and need of excursions in the initial 
work in geography. Illustrations of excursions. The earth as a 
whole. 

2. Geography of the Mississippi Valley in the Fourth Grade. Dis- 
cussion of the following principles: 1 Movement from the home out- 
ward. 2. Type study in geography. 3. Causal relations. 4. Com- 
parison. 5. Oral treatment of topics. 6. Relations to other subjects. 
Discussions of the list of topics suitable for the geography of the 
Mississippi Valley. 

CHAPTER III. 

In the work in Special Method, both in history and literature, 
and in g-eography, illustrative lessons are given, making use of some 
of the materials discussed. A few lessons, especially in literature, 
are given before the students, by the assistant training teacher, with 
a class of little children in the practice school. These lessons are 
made the subject of discussions on methods and devices employed. 



PEDAGOGY.— First Year, Third Term. 

CHAPTER I. 

The first month is devoted to Special Method in Reading. A num- 
ber of readers for the earlier grades, and of literary masterpieces 
suitable -to the different grades, are read and discussed; 1, as to 
whether they meet the requirements of interesting and instructive 
thought content, and, 2, as to whether they are well adapted to ad- 
vance the child in his mastery of the mechanical phase of reading. 
The text of McMurry's "Special Method of Reading," is then read 
and discussed. Lists of classic literary masterpieces suited to the 
different grades arc noted, and their culture values, both to the child 
and to the teacher, are discussed. The work is closed with some ex- 
position of the method of teaching" reading in the different grades. 



Illinois State Normal University. 39 

CHAPTER II. 

The second month of the term is devoted to a discussion of the 
Special Method in Teaching" Natural Science. Early in the term, the 
students are set to work to make observations upon some of the ob- 
jects of nature about them, e. g. the red maple and the robin, for the 
purpose of acquiring - some idea of the meaning and value of the di- 
rect observation of nature, both as furnishing the basis for true 
scientific knowledge, and as a preparation for the work of teaching 
natural science. These objects are watched during the spring- 
months, and their development and habits noted daily, as accurately 
as possible. These observations are later made the basis of a full 
discussion of the objects observed, for the purpose of illustrating the 
principles of selection and treatment of materials in teaching nat- 
ural science to children. After these type objects have been fully 
treated, the principles involved are discussed as follows: 1. Selection 
of materials for nature study. 2. Preparation of the teacher. 3. Ex- 
cursions and observations by the children. 4. Methods and devices in 
the discussion of topics. 5. Type studies in natural science. 6. Value 
of nature study to the child and to the teacher. 

CHAPTER III. 

The third month is devoted to a discussion of the general laws 
underlying the method of instruction (or the so-called "Formal Steps 
of instruction"), and of kindred pedagogical principles bearing upon 
the work of the teacher in the class room. It is the aim of this work 
to show what the laws of thought are that determine how the teacher 
must present a subject to the class. 



PSYCHOLOGY. —First Term. 

1. Psycholog-y and Its Relations to the Teacher. 

2. The Educational Limitations of Psychology. 

3. The Treatment of Psychology adopted. 

4. The Bases of Psychical Life, (a) Sensation, (b) Interest, (c) 
Impulse. 

5. The Psychical Processes, (a) Introduction: Classification of con- 
tents of our minds, (b) Classification of processes corresponding to 
these contents, (c) The Processes: 1. Non-voluntary attention. 2. As- 
sociation. 3. Voluntary attention. 4. Educational Principles. 5. Ap- 
perception and Retention. 

6. Forms of Intellectual Development, (a) Principles of intellec- 
tual development, (b) Stages of intellectual development: 1. Training 
of perception. 2. Training of the memory. 3. Training of thought. 



40 Annual Catalogue 

7. The forms of Emotional Development, (a) Condition of inter- 
est, (b) Principles of emotional growth, (c) The forms, or stages of 
emotional growth. 

8. Forms of Volitional Development, (a) Factors of volitional 
development, (b) Stages of volitional development. 

9. Mind and Body, (a) Importance of body for soul, (b) Struc- 
ture of nervous system in man. (c) Elementary properties of nervous 
structure, (d) Psychological equivalents, (e) Localization of func- 
tion. (f)Educational principles. 

10. Summary of Principles, (a) Bases of instruction, (b) Ends of 
instruction, (c) Methods of instruction, (d) Relation of knowledge, 
feeling, and will, (e) Criticism of maxims. 

11. The method of Interrogation, Art of Questioning, (a) Intro- 
duction, (b) Objects of questioning: 1. Testing retention. 2. Train- 
ing of apperception, (c) Qualifications of the questioner, (d) Matter 
and form of questions, (e) Matter and form of answers. 

Text-book. Applied Psychology. McLellan and Dewey. 

ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY.— First Term. 
Introductory. 

1. Science and Method of Psychology, (a) Subject matter of 
Psychology, (b) Methods of Psychology: (1) Introspective; (2) Ex- 
perimental; (3) Comparative; (4) Objective. 

2. Mind and Modes of Activity, (a) Aspects of Consciousness. 
(6) Relations to each other, (c) Relations to the whole self. 

.'}. Knowledge. 

1. Elements of knowledge: (a) Sensation in General. 1. Physical 
Stimulus: 2. Psychical Factor; 3. Relations of Psychical and Physi- 
cal: 4. Functions of Sensation in Psychical Life, (b) Special Senses 
—Relations to Touch. 1. Touch: I. Weber's Law and Psycho-physi- 
cal .Methods. II. Muscular Sensation. 2. Smell. 3. Taste. 4. Hear- 
ing. 5. Sight. 6. Temperature. 7. General Sensation. 

2. Processes of Knowledge: (a) Nature of Problem: 1. Sensa- 
1 ions and Known Objects. 2. The Knowing Self. (6) Apperception: 
1. Problem of Apperception. 2. Kinds of Apperception, (c) Associ- 
ation: 1. Conditions. 2. Forms. I. Simultaneous or Fusion. II. 
Successive: By Contiguity; by Similarity. III. Functions of Associ- 
tion. (d) Dissociation. 1. Relation to Association. 2. Conditions. 
.'{. Functions in Psychical Life, (e) Attention. 1 Attention as Se- 
lecting Activity. 2. Attention as Adjusting Activity. 3. Atten- 
tion as I telatj ag Activity. (/) Retention. 

.'{. Stages of Knowledge: (a) Perception. I. Of objects. 2. Of 
Space 3. Of Externality in General, (b) Memory. 1. Definition 



Illinois State Normal University. 41 

and Problem. 2. The Memory Image. 3. Memory of Time. 4. Self 
as Past and Present, (c) Imagination. 1. Definition. 2. Ideals in 
Imagination. 3. Practical and Theoretical, (d) Thinking. 1. Defi- 
nition and division. 2. Conception; growth of knowledge. 3. Judg- 
ment; Belief. 4. Reasoning. I. A priori and a posteriori. II. Induc- 
tive and Deductive. 5. Systematization. (e) Intuition. 1. Intuition 
of the World. 2. Intuition of Self. 3. Intuition of God. 

Peeling. — Second Term. 
1. Introduction. 2. Sensuous Feeling. 3. Formal Feelings, (a) 
Of present adjustment, (b) Due to past experience, (c) Directed to- 
ward the Future. 4. Development of Qualitative Feeling, (a) In 
Universality, (b) In Definiteness. (c) Abnormal. (cZ) Conflict of. 
5. Intellectual Feeling, (a) General Nature. (&) Spring to intellec- 
tual action, (c) Objective side. 6. ^Esthetic Feeling. I. General 
Nature. (a) Connection with Idealization. (b) Universality of 
Beauty. (c) Factors of ^Esthetic Feeling— Harmony. II. As a 
Spring to Action, (a) The fine arts. III. The ^Esthetic Judgment- 
Taste. 7. Personal Feeling. I. General Nature, (a) Social, (6) 
Moral, (c) Religious. II. As a Spring to Action, (a) Social Institu- 
tions. III. The Personal Judgment — Conscience. 

The Will. 

1. Sensuous impulses, (a) Reflex action, (b) impulses of percep- 
tion, (c) Instinctive impulses, (d) Instincts of expression. 

2. Development of volition, (a) Desire. (6) Choice— Motive, (c) 
Realization of motive. 

3. Physical control, (a) Localization of motor impulses, (b) Com- 
bination of motor impulses. 

4. Prudential control, (a) Development of desire. (6) Choice of 
ends and means, (c) Forms of prudential control. 1. Practical. 2. In- 
tellectual. 3. Emotional. 

5. Moral control, (a) Development of ethical desire, (b) Ethical 
choice, (c) Results of moral action. 1. Generic volition. 2. Regula- 
tion of desires. 3. Accurate and intuitive choice. 4. Effective exe- 
cution. 

Text: Dewey's Psychology. 

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION.— Third Term. 
Part I. Education in its general idea: (a) Its Nature. 1. Possible 
only to self-active beings. 2. Education Iry Divine Providence, by ex- 
perience, or teachers. 3. Relates to body, intellect, and will; must be 
systematic; conducted in schools, (b) Its form. 1. Self-estrangement, 



42 Annual Catalogue 

work, play. 2. Habit. 3. Authority, obedience, punishment, (c) Its 
Limits. 1. Subjective limit in the pupil's capacity. 2. Objective limit 
in the pupil's wealth and leisure. 3. Absolute limit in the pupil's com- 
pletion of school work. 

Part II. Education in its special elements, (a) Physical. 1. Die- 
tetics. 2. Gymnastics. 3. Sexual (omitted.) {b) Intellectual. 1. Psy- 
chological epochs, (a) Intuitive — sense-perception. (6) Imaginative — 
fancy and memory, (c) Logical. II. Logical order, (a) of development 
of the pupil, (b) of development of the subject, (c) of demonstration. 

I. Analytic. 2. Synthetic. 3. Dialectical. III. Instruction, (a) Pupil's 
capacity, (b) Pupil's act of learning. 1. Mechanical. 2. Dynamical. 
3. Assimilative, (c) Method of instruction. 1. Living example. 2. Text- 
book. 3. Oral, (d) Will training. 1. Social usages. 2. Moral training. 
(a) The Virtues, (b) Discipline, (c) Character. 3. Religious education 
(omitted). 

Part III. Education in its particular Systems, (a) National. l.Pas 
sive. (a) Family — China, (b) Caste — India, (c) Monkish— Thibet. 2. 
Active, (a) Military— Persia. (6) Priestly— Egypt, (c) Industrial- 
Phoenicia. 3, Individual, (a) Aesthetic— Greece. (6) Practical — 
Rome, (c) Abstract Individual— German tribes, (d) Theocratic — The 
Jews, (e) Humanitarian, or Christian. I. Monkish II. Chivalric. 
III. Citizen. 1. For special callings, (a) Secular, (b) Jesuits, (c) Pie- 
tistic. 2. To achieve an ideal of culture, (a) Humanist, (b) Philan- 
thropist. 3. For free citizenship. Text-book, Rosenkranz. 

PEDAGOGY.— First, Second, Third Term. Three Wmrsa Week. 

Topics for Study. 1. The chief aim of Education. 2. The Rela- 
tive Value of Studies. 3. Nature of Interest. 4. Concentration. 
5. Apperception. 6. Induction. 7. The Formal Steps. 

Examination of the Course of study below the High School. 1. 
Fields which the course of study must cover. 2. Value of Literature 
as an introduction to the life of the school. 3. Essential nature of a 
story. 4. Method of estimating the value of the story for the primary 
grades. 5. List of stories suitable for first grade. 6. Place of science 
in primary grades. 7. Suitable topics for fall term, winter and spring 
terms. 8. Reading. What is it? What associations should be formed? 
9. What error often made? 10. How help the child to help himself? 

II. How can literature and science be utilized? 12. Illustrative ex- 
ercises given by training teachers with class. 13. Careful study 
of the exercise. Similar illustrative exercises in other parts of the 
course with a review of special methods. 



Illinois State Normal University. 43 



Practice Work in Model School. 



(See Courses of Study.) 

Each Normal student is required to teach four terms in the Prac- 
tice School, for forty-five minutes each day. At least one term must 
be spent in the Primary Grades. All practice work is performed 
under the immediate oversight of the training- teachers. The work of 
criticism is both personal and general. The general criticisms are 
given in teachers' meetings, one of which is held each week. The 
special criticisms are given in grade meetings and in personal inter- 
views. Pupil teachers must submit plans of work to their supervisor, 
which must be approved before being put into execution. They are 
held responsible for the control and general management of their 
classes. They are expected to make personal studies of the pupils, 
so that they may give accurate descriptions of their character, per- 
sonal peculiarities, habits of study, and general disposition. 

Generally each pupil teacher is under the observation of one or 
more pupil teachers, who make careful notes of the work. By this 
arrangement the training teachers are enabled to determine accur- 
ately the skill with which discipline is maintained. in their absence. 

The practice work of the pupil teachers reaches from the first 
grade of the Primary School through the first year of the High 
School. In addition to the work of instruction, pupils are required 
to take charge of a room during opening exercises, and to have the 
management of children as much as possible. 

Frequent illustrative exercises, conducted by training teachers, 
are given to the whole body of pupil teachers. These cover a variety 
of subjects, but are usually given in those studies in which there is 
the greatest probability of lack of skill on the part of the pupil 
teachers. It is found that subjects like Natural Science and Litera- 
ture afford the greatest difficulties to the ordinary teacher; conse- 
quently, exercises are given in those subjects more frequently than in 
any others. 

Persons desiring to fit themselves for primary teachers are per- 
mitted to put in all of their time with the training teacher having 
the lowest departments in charge. 

During recesses and noons children are under the general oversight 
of pupil teachers, who make careful studies of individual pupils as 
they manifest their dispositions in games or other recreations. 



44 Annual Catalogue. 



Department of Ancient Languages. 

LATIN. 

1. Beginning Latin. Jones's Latin Lessons through Lesson XC, and 

TIarkness's Grammar to match. 
Roman pronunciation. Declension- of typical nouns, adjectives, 
and pronouns. Comparison of regular adjectives and adverbs. Con- 
jugation of regular verbs. Irregular forms. Prepositions. Uses of 
various cases. Uses of the subjunctive mood. The gerund and the 
gerundive. Sequence of tenses. Indirect discourse. Constant drill 
in pronunciation, translation, and composition. Thoroughness in all 
this elementary work will be insisted upon. The ability slowly and 
painfully to recall paradigm forms is of no value. Two terms— Twenty 
seven weeks. 

2. Eutropius, four weeks. Beginning Caesar. Gallic War, ten 

Chapters of Book 1. All of Collar' 's Composition based upon the same. 

Attention to the uses of the various cases, the subjunctives, the 
gerund and gerundives, the indirect discourse. The advance lesson 
each day is translated as literally as is consistent with fair English: 
the review more freely. Life of Caesar. History of the age. Geog- 
raphy of Italy and Gaul. Twelve weeks. 

3. Second and Third Terms Caesar. Gallic War, Books I- IV com- 

pleted. Historically interesting parts of Books V-VIL Composition- 

Sight trading, Eutropius. 
Related history and geography. Continued drill upon forms, upon 
syntax, and upon indirect discourse. Extended study of minor gram- 
matical principles, especially with reference to uses of cases, tenses, 
and moods. Parts of the text are translated slowly and critically; 
rapid translation of other portions; sight translations. Collar's Com- 
position based upon Book II. Elementary derivation work. Two 
Terms — Twenty-seven weeks. 

4. Cicero. Four Catiline Orations, Archias, Ligarius, Manilian Law, 

Marcellus. Collar's Composition, Part IV. Sight-reading, Nepos. 
Critical translations of some portions; rapid translation of other 
parts. Syntax. Life of Cicero. Related history, geography, and bi- 
ography. The Augustan Age. Thought analysis of orations. Writ- 
ten re-review of one in exceptionally smooth English. Sight 



Illinois State Normal University. 45 

translation. Derivation work. Continued drill upon word-formation. 
Especial study of English prefixes and suffixes traceable to Latin 
originals. Two Terms — Twenty-seven weeks. 

5. Ovid. Selections, mostly from Metamorphoses, 1,500—3,000 lines. Kelsey's 

Greek and Roman Mythology. Sight translation. 
Life and works of Ovid. Derivation work, Especial study of am- 
plifications of important roots. English Latin derivatives. Lectures 
upon rise and status of Philology. The Indo-European family. The 
Teutonic branch. Grimm's Law. Elementary principles of versifi- 
cation. Scansion. Twelve weeks. 

6. Vergil. ^Eneid, Books I- VI. Horace. Selections, six weeks. 

Related biography, history, geography, and mythology. Careful 
study of versification. Facility in scansion required. English words 
derived from Latin. Continued study of roots and their amplifica- 
tions; some notice of their forms in other Aryan languages. Lectures 
upon the genesis of suffixes, of declension and conjugation. Origin 
of affixes. Genesis of primitive monosyllabic roots, and theories con- 
cerning the origin of language. Philology's attitude toward Darwin 
and toward the Bible account of creation. Two Terms— Twenty-seven 
weeks. 

7. Livy. Selections. 

The last class reads Books XXI and XXII entire. Related his- 
tory, geography, and biography. Comparative work in syntax. Study 
of the literary style of the author. Twelve weeks. 

8. Tacitus (optional). Germania, or Agricola, or both. Twelve weeks. 

GREEK. 

1. Beginning Greek. FrosVs Greek Primer and Goodwin's Grammar to 

match. 
Declension of typical nouns, adjectives, and pronouns. Compari- 
son of regular adjectives and adverbs. Conjugation of regular verbs. 
Irregular forms. Prepositions. Constant drill in pronunciation, 
translation, and composition. Thoroughness in all this work will be 
insisted upon. The ability slowly and painfully to recall paradigm 
forms is of no value. Fifteen weeks. 

2. Zenophon. Anabasis I- IV: or Anabasis Til, and selections fromHel- 

lenica and Memorabilia. Sight translation. Greek prose composition. 
Use of cases, tenses, moods. Drill upon irregular verbs. Critical 
translation of portions of the text; free translation of other parts. 



46 Annual Catalogue 

More extended study of minor grammatical principles. Related geog- 
raphy, history, and biograph}'. Composition work based upon the 
text. Elementary derivation work. Goodwin's chapter on word 
formation. Thirty-nine weeks. 

3 and 4. Plato. Selections from Phaedo. 

Careful review of principles of Greek grammar and study of con- 
structions involved in the translation. Sight translation. Biography. 

Herodotus. Selections from Persian Wars. 

Study of Ionic forms and comparison with corresponding Attic 
forms. Classical geography studied in so far as useful for an intel- 
ligent exposition of the text. Sight translation. Related biography 
and history. 

Derivation Work. Review of Goodwin on Word Formation. 
Primary and secondary suffixes. English and Latin prefixes and 
suffixes traceable to the Greek originals. Amplifications of import- 
ant roots. English words of Greek origin. Lectures upon the rise 
and status of Philology. The Aryan family. The Teutonic branch. 
Grimm's law. Twenty-four weeks. 

5. Homer. Iliad, Books I-IV; or I- II, and an equivalent for III-IV from 

the Odyssey. 

Related history and geography. Greek mythology. Homeric 
forms compared with Attic and Ionic. Careful study of versification. 
Facility in scansion required. Rapid translations of portions of text. 
Critical exposition of other parts. Derivation work. Continued study 
of roots. Lectures upon genesis of suffixes, of declension, and of con- 
jugation. Origin of affixes. The primative monosyllabic roots and 
the theories concerning" the origin of language. Philology's attitude 
towark the Bible account of creation: toward Darwin. Twelve weeks. 

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN. 

First Year.— Dr. Meissner's Public School German Grammar. 

First term. Declension of Substantives. Declension and com- 
parison of adjectives. Classification and conjugation of verbs. Form- 
ation of compound nouns. Formation of adjectives. Force and use 
of prefixes. Prepositions and the cases which they govern. Boisen's 
preparatory prose. Especial reference to German constructions and 
idioms. 

Second term. Boisen's prose continued. Review Syntax. Con- 
tinued drill upon construction. Sight translation. Pronunciation of 
German. 



Illinois State Normal University. 47 

Third term. Hermann and Dorothea. Sight translation. German 
prose, with especial attention to order. Das Lied von der Glocke. 
Conversation. Pronunciation. 

Second Year.— First term. WihelmTell. Jungfrau von Orleans. 
Sight translation. Ability to translate fairly easy German upon 
hearing it read, is required. German prose with especial reference 
to idioms. Conversation. Pronunciation. 

Second term. Minna von Barnhelm. Maria Stuart. Short Ger- 
man essays. Sight translation. Pronunciation. Conversation. 

Third term. German lyrics. Sight translation. Considerable 
practice in German conversation, which has now become the language 
of the class. (The classics read are varied from year to year). 



POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

1. Production.— Land and Natural Agents, Labor, Origin and Office 
of Capital, Productive Capability of a Community. 

2. Exchange. — Theory of Value, Theory of International Ex- 
changes; Money and its Value, Debased Coin, Seigniorage, Inconvert- 
ible Paper Money, Bank Money; Reaction of Exchange upon 
Production. 

3. Distribution. — Parties to the Distribution of Wealth: Rent, In- 
terest, Profits, Wages, Minor Shares, Reaction of Distribution upon 
Production. 

4. Consumption. — Subsistence, Population, Appearance of New 
Economic Wants, Consumption, the Dynamics of Wealth, Reaction of 
Consumption upon Production. 

5. Application of Economical Principles.— Usury Laws, Banking 
Functions, Co-operation, Trades Unions and Strikes, Unearned Incre- 
ment of Land, Political Money, Bi-Metallism, Pauperism, Revenue of 
the State, Principles of Taxation, Protection and Free Trade. 

An attempt is made to interest the pupils deeply in the practical 
questions of the day. Last year the Bland Silver Bill, the McKinley 
Tariff Bill, with the majority and minority reports: Blaine's and 
Gladstone's article in the North American Beview upon the Tariff, 
were placed in the hands of the pupils and carefully discussed. This 
year Henry George's Free Trade and Protection, and McKinley's 
opening speech upon his bill, received similar attention. Recent 
monetary questions: Coin's Financial School. Cash vs. Coin. Single 
Tax Theory; Public and Private Ownership of Land. Walker's Tract 
on Bimetallism. Text: Walker. Twelve Weeks. 



48 Annual Catalogue 



The Practice School. 



The Grammar School is intended for those who wish to prepare 
for the Normal School, for a High School, or for general business. 

Young men and young women not fully prepared for the Normal 
Department are enabled to enter after spending a term or two in the 
rigorous preparatory drill of the Grammar School; while, to those who 
are preparing for a High School, it offers excellent academic train- 
ing. It is in the direct charge of a Principal, and his assistant 
teachers are under the constant supervision of the Principal Training 
Teacher. 

Pupils often fail in their effort to get a higher education, simply 
because the i^ iJKft eJ^aj^v^ejfaatjpn-shas been poor; hence, great care 
is taken that each shall be well-founded in elementary knowledge. 

Those who wish merely a common-school education' will find the 
course comprehensive enough for all ordinary business purposes. 
Much care is taken that pupils shall become good penmen, and that 
they shall acquire a ready knowledge of arithmetic, in order that 
they may make good accountants. Those more advanced will have the 
opportunity of studying bookkeeping, taught according to the most 
practical methods. ^ 

The grading is such that pupils may take the work which they are 
best fitted to do; and, during the second year, those who may wisely 
do so are allowed to take any of the languages in the Normal School. 

The moral influence of the school and its surroundings are good. 
Vicious boys who are outcasts from other schools will not find admit- 
tance here. Saloons and other places of evil resort are not allowed in 
the town. Tuition is charged at the rate of $25 a year. 

SEVENTH- GRADE— Fall Term. 

Arithmetic. Begin page 68. Tests of Divisibility. Factoring, 
L.C.M., G.C.D. Correct and rapid oral work. Thorough review. 

Grammar. Composition and letter writing. Southworth and 
Goddard, page 1-72. 

History. Scudder's Life of George Washington, especially the 
part bearing on the Revolutionary War. 

Reading. Sohraband Rustum. Tales of the White Hills, Grand- 
mother's Story of Hunker Hill. 



Illinois State Normal University. 49 

Natural Science. Air pressure, pumps, steam engine. 
Geography. Type studies on Asia and Africa. 
Spelling - and Writing - . Lists in spelling- derived from other les- 
sons. Exercises in vertical script. 

Winter Term. 

Arithmetic. Common and decimal fractions. Compound num- 
bers. 

Grammar. Etymology of the noun and its modifiers. 

History. Beginning's of the war in Massachusetts and New Eng- 
land. Biography of Samuel Adams. 

Reading. Washington's Rules of Conduct, Sella, Thanatopsis, 
etc. Lamb's Tales of Shakespeare. Declaration of Independence. 

Natural Science. Woodhull's simple experiments for the school 
room. 

Geography. Type studies of Australia and Africa. Spelling and 
writing as in Fall term. 

Spring Term. 

Arithmetic. Complete compound numbers. Begin Percentage. 
Cook and Cropsey. 

Grammar. Etymology of the verb and its modifiers. 

History. Burgoyne's Campaign, Cornwallis's Campaign in the 
South; Biography of Putnam, Starke, Greene, Schuyler, Marion and 
Sumter. 

Reading. Enoch Arden, Poor Richard's Almanac, The Christmas 
Carol. 

Natural Science. Animal types. 

Geography. Type studies of South America and of the whole 
world. 

Writing and Spelling. 



EIGHTH GRADE— Fall Term. 

Arithmetic. Review decimal fractions and Federal and English 
Money. Advance work, simple percentage to interest. Cook and 
Cropsey, page 224. 

Grammar. Nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, 
and conjunctions. Analysis and parsing. 

History. From the Battle of Yorktown to the election of Wash- 
ington. The adoption of the Constitution. 

Reading. Evangeline, Snow Bound. Webster's Bunker Hill 
Speech. Tales of the White Hills. 



50 Annual Catalogue 

Natural Science. Respiration, circulation, and digestion. Tem- 
perance teaching in this connection. 
Spelling and Essay Work. 

Winter Term. 

Arithmetic. Interest and other applications of percentage. Cook 
and Cropsey, pp. 224-262. 

Grammar. Analysis of a classic. Etymology of verb. 

History. Study to the close of John Quincy Adams's administra- 
tion. Acquisition of territory. Rise of political parties. The steam- 
boat. War of 1812. System of Revenue. Biographies of John Adams 
and Jefferson. 

Reading. Vision of Sir Launfal. Merchant of Venice. Enoch 
Arden. Selections from Open Sesame, Vol. III. 

Natural Science. The eye and ear as related to sight and sound. 
Physiology of ear and eye. Physics of sound and light. 

Spelling and essay work. 

Spring Term. 

Arithmetic. Ratio and proportion. Involution and Evolution. 
Mensuration. 

Grammar. Analysis of a classic. Review of syntax. 

History. Chief topics to close of Civil War. Internal improve- 
ments. Leading inventions and inventors. Leading statesmen and 
parties. History of Slavery. The war with Mexico. The Civil War. 
Immigration. Civil Service Reform. Biographies of John Quincy 
Adams, Daniel Webster, and Abraham Lincoln. 

Reading. Julius Caesar. Webster's Oration on Adams and Jef- 
ferson. Marmion. Sharp Eyes. 

Natural Science. Sun, moon, stars, and planets, Starland. 

Spelling, writing, and essay work. 



PREPARATORY CLASS. 

Arithmetic. Cook & Cropsey, pages 68-193. Omit some parts of 
compound numbers. Careful analysis. Drill on oral problems for ac- 
curacy and speed. Illustrate with objects, diagrams, measurements, 
and practical problems. 

Grammar. Chief parts and modiliers in the sentence. Kinds 
of sentences. Parts of speech. Analysis of sentences and parsing. 
Compositions once a month, corrected and rewritten. 

Dictionary Work. The Grammar school list with the prepara- 
tory principles. 



Illinois State Normal University. 51 

Reading - . Tales of the White Hills, Snow Bound, Vision of Sir 
Launfal, Tales of Shakespeare. 

Geography. Study of the types of United States, and of North 
America. 

Spelling. Derived from words taken from all the regular studies. 



SIXTH GRADE. 

Spelling, Fall Term. Words from the different branches. 

Spelling, Winter- Term. Text, Hawthorne's "Grandfather's 
Chair." Memorize "The Children's Hour." Phonics. 

Reading, Winter Term. Courtship of Miles Standish, Snow 
Bound. Select pieces from Children's Treasury of English Song and 
from Golden Treasures of Songs and Lyrics. Sight-reading of Birds 
and Bees. 

Arithmetic, Fall Term. Text, "Cook and Cropsey." A thorough 
review of fractions, common and decimal. Compound numbers. De- 
velop tables by performing measurements. Areas of rectangle, 
triangle, rhombus. Area of walls, of room, ceiling - , carpeting rooms; 
matching patterns. Number of fence boards for a fence. Division 
of large body of land into smaller bodies. Use diagrams when pos- 
sible. Illustrative, concrete examples. Mental drill in rapid addi- 
tion, subtraction, etc.; prime numbers, factors. 

Arithmetic, Winter Term. Review fractions (common and deci- 
mal), compound numbers, measurements. Practice in quick abstract 
work. Complete Cook and Cropsey's Elementary Arithmetic from 
page 288. 

Geography, Fall Term. Text, "Our American Neighbors," 
"Fishing - Off Newfoundland," "Winter Sports in Canada," "French 
Canadian Farm Life," "The Canadian Lumberman," "The Canadian 
Prairies." "Location, Boundary, and Birds-Eye View of the Physical 
Features of Canada." 

Geography, Winter Term. The City of Mexico; the Rocky Moun- 
tains; North America as a whole; the British Isles; commerce and 
navy of England; London, Glasgow, Manchester, Oxford. 

Language, Fall Term. Composition work, letter form, material 
drawn from real studies. Oral, follow Bright's outlines. Formation 
of plurals. Subject, predicate adjectives. Oral work indicated in 
each child's "Outline Book." 

Language, Winter Term. Review (Bright). Take 6th Grade 
Work; regular composition exercises; select lessons from DeGarmo's 
No. 4. 



52 Annual Catalogue. 

Drawing, Pall Term. 

1. Drawings of fruits and vegetables, the apple, potato, squash, 
tomato. 

2. The horizon line. 

3. Appearance above or below horizon line of the horizontal circle. 

4. Appearance of vertical cylinder. Objects based on it: Cuff, 
tumbler, can of fruit. 

5. Center of vision. 

6. Appearance of vertical circle to left or right of C.V. 

7. The horizontal cylinder in seven different positions. 

8. Objects based upon horizontal cylinder: muff, rolling pin. 
Writing, Fall Term. Position complete; forearm movement, 

form: small letters; figures; Normal review system. 

Natural Science, Fall Term. Honey bee, bumble bee, grasshop- 
per, cricket, dragon-fly, butterfly (life history complete), frog. Cam- 
pus excursions for study of trees, insects, and preparations for 
winter. 

Natural Science, Winter Term. Cold, heat, storms, freezing, 
barometer, expansion and contraction of bodies, thermometer (mer- 
cury), steam engine, light, prism, refraction, reflection, telescope, 
microscope, the planets, animalcule, gunpowder, guns, and cannon 
(forts and ships), volcanoes, town geology. 

History, Fall Term. Moore's "Puritans and Pilgrims." Begin 
"Autobiography of Franklin." Keep for review purposes, outlines 
in "Outline Book." 

History, Winter Term. Continue life of Franklin; New England 
under Andros; Virginia during Colonial Times; New York and the 
Five Nations. 

Spring Term. 

Spelling — As in 3d grade; 15 words a lesson. 

Reading — Phonics. Review. Table of Cognates. Use of the dic- 
tionary. Memory selections. Irving's Sketch Book. Hunting of the 
Deer, etc. 

Arithmetic — Cook and Cropsey, pp. 68-126. Second Book. Daily 
oral drill. 

Geography— The British Isles and France. Type studies. 

Language— Letters and business forms. Bright, 6th year. De- 
( .anno No. 4. 

Drawing— See 5th grade. 

Bistory— New York. Pennsylvania. Carolina. Georgia. 

Natural Science — The native forest trees of Illinois; their dis- 
tribution and use. 



Illinois State Normal Vniversity. 53 

FIFTH GRADE. 

Spelling, Fall Term. Words from the different branches. 

Reading - , Fall Term. Hiawatha. Memorizing of three selections 
from same. Phonics. All vowel sounds. Diphthongs. Use of Dic- 
tionary. 

Reading, Winter Term. Black Beauty, Songs of Labor. Selec- 
tions from Higginson's American Explorers, from Heart of Oak, Nos. 
2 and 3, and from Children's Treasury of English Song. 

Arithmetic, Fall Term. Text, Gook and Cropsey. Fractions, page 
220. Supplement by simple, present, illustrative material. Drill on 
principles. Decimals, begin page 250, supplement same as above. 
Use diagrams. United States Money, begin page 260. Original bills. 
Compound numbers, page 267. Develop table by performing the 
actual, practical work with apparatus and measures. Drill on tables. 

Arithmetic, Winter Term. Review factoring, decimals, page 
250. United States Money. Quick oral work. 

Geography, Fall Term. A sugar plantation of Louisiana. Cattle 
Ranches. Pike's Peak and vicinity. Irrigation in vicinity of Den- 
ver. Hudson River. Sand modeling of United States and Denver 
vicinity, showing system of irrigation. 

Geography, Winter Term. Mt. Washington (White Mountains). 
Boston (history and commerce). Cotton Mills at Lowell (Merrimac). 
Ship building at Philadelphia. Oyster fisheries of the Chesapeake 
(Long Island Sound). City of Washington (government and govern- 
ment buildings). Surface of Virginia (lowlands, mountains). The 
pineries of Carolina. Alleghany Mountains as a whole. 

Language, Fall Term. Letter form; composition form; material 
drawn from the real studies. Oral, Bright's Outline. 

Language, Winter Term. Composition taken from outline topics 
in other studies. Bright. Review fourth grade. Study fifth grade. 
DeGarmo No 3. 

Drawing, Fall Term. First six topics indicated for Sixth Grade, 
but need more drill on objects based upon the vertical cylinder. 

Drawing, Winter Term. Subjects from Geography, History and 
Natural Science: e.g., ships, forts, scenery, plants and animals. 

Writing, Fall Term. Same as sixth grade. 

Natural Science, Fall Term. Bee; locust: animals at Miller Park; 
trees of the campus. 

Natural Science, Winter Term. Mineral springs, granite, air 
pressure (barometer); thermometer (effects of heat and cold); the 
compass, north star, the moon's phases, the earth as a planet, Indian 
corn, cotton-plant; the sturgeon, the horse, the rabbit, the oyster, the 
cod-fish, the whale. 



54 Annual Catalogue 

Histor}', Fall Term. Columbus— Teachers' Text; Magellan. 
History, Winter Term. Continue Magellan, Cortez, Raleigh, 
Drake, John Smith. 

Spring Term. 

Spelling— Same as in fall and winter. 

Reading — Review of fall and winter work. Table of equivalents. 
Use of dictionary. Review memory selections. Continue Lays of 
Ancient Rome. King of the Golden River. 

Arithmetic— Cook and Cropsey, pp. 267-292. Measurements. Rapid 
oral drill. 

Geography — City of Washington. Surface of Virginia. Pineries 
of Carolina. Alleghany Mountains. Oranges in Florida. New York 
City. 

Language—Composition. Letter-writing. Oral exercises. Bright, 
fifth year. DeGarmo, No. 3. 

Drawing — Five type solids in review, square prism, etc. 

Writing — As fourth grade. 

History — Champlain, Hudson, Cortez, John Smith. 

Natural Science—Maple. Oak. Soil. Sunshine. Corn plant. 



FOURTH GRADE. 

Spelling, Fall Term. Words taken from their different studies. 
List of words filed each Monday morning by each teacher. Each 
child preserves his list in a penny note-book. 

Spelling, Winter Term. Same plan as above. 

Reading, Fall Term. Hawthorne's Wonder Book, The Golden 
Touch, The Three Golden Apples, The Chimaera, Phonics. 

Reading, Winter Term. Gods and Heroes, Ulysses Among the 
Phaeacians, Selections from Open Sesame No. 1 and No. 2. Kinsgley's 
Water Babies, for sight reading. 

Arithmetic, Fall Term. Multiplication tables through the 12's. 
Mental drill. Rapid addition, subtraction; simple fractional parts, as 
i of 27; i of 30; i of 40, etc. Add and substract three, four, and five- 
place numbers. Multiply six-place numbers by four-place multiplier. 
Short division — dividend six-place numbers. Bills and somewhat of 
United States money. Text, Cook and Cropsey, to page 173. 

Arithmetic, Winter Term. Arabic notations and numeration 
through nine orders. Much practice in subtraction and multipli- 
cation for accuracy and rapidity. Review short division with divisor 
up to J2. Long division. Develop tables of denominate numbers. 
With objects and diagram, show £, fr, if, ±, f, 2-5, etc. 



Illinois Slate Normal University. 55 

Geography, Fall Term. Coal mine; Pineries and Lumbering; 
Lake Superior, St. Mary's Canal and Falls. Other falls in St. Law- 
rence Basin. Iron Mines of Michigan. 

Geography, Winter Term. Corn and live stock in Illinois. Trip 
on the Upper Mississippi. Minneapolis as a trade center. (Wheat 
Fields of the Northwest). Lake Michigan compared with Lake Su- 
perior. Hard-wood forests of Indiana (and Ohio Valley). The blast 
furnace (Chicago and Pittsburg). Chicago as a trade center. To- 
bacco raising in Kentucky. Surface of Tennessee. 

Language, Fall Term. Composition; material drawn from His- 
tory, Science, Geography; letter form. Oral. Bright's Outline, begin. 
Hold in child's Outline Book. 

Language, Winter Term. Compositions derived from other 
studies. Bright's Book. Review Third Grade. Take Fourth Grade 
work, DeGarmo's No. 2, parts 3 and 4. 

Drawing, Fall Term. First six topics indicated for Sixth Grade, 
but need more drill upon objects based upon the vertical cylinder. 

Drawing, Winter Term. Topics selected from other studies. 
Court house; gables of school house; plants. 

Writing, Fall Term. Same as Sixth Grade. 

Natural Science, Fall Term. Bee, bumble bee, honey; grasshop- 
per; frog; opossum. Studies on the campus; sow bug; centipede; 
pines, spruces, hemlock, cypress. 

Natural Science, Winter Term. Gold, water, fire, coal and its 
origin, iron (its qualities and uses), the sun and sunlight, the air 
(winds) soil, gunpowder, tobacco, the cat-fish, the buffalo, the beaver, 
the deer, the wild turkey. 

History, Fall Term. Text, "Pioneer History Stories," La Salle, 
Joliet, and Marquette, Hennepin, Lincoln. 

History, Winter Term. Boone, Robertson, George Rogers Clark, 
Lewis and Clarke. 

Spring Term. 

Spelling — As in fall and winter. 

Reading — Phonics. Review winter work. Take table of long 
vowels and diphthongs. Use dictionary. Continue Gods and Heroes.. 
Tanglewood Tales. 

Arithmetic — Cook and Cropsey, pp. 199-230. 

Geography — Corn and live-stock, hard-wood forests, surface of 
Tennessee, the Lower Mississippi, cotton, sugar, cattle-ranch. 

Language — Letter writing and composition. Bright's Fourth 
Year. DeGarmo, No. 2, parts 3 and 4. 

Drawing— Review three type solids, sphere, cube, cylinder. Add 
other type solids, square, prism, etc. 



56 Annual Catalogue 

Writing -T, F,H, R, P, K, B. 1-9. Movement exercises. 
History — Cincinnati, Lewis and Clarke. Fremont. DeSoto. 
Natural Science — Oak, Maple, soil, sunlight, corn-plant. 



THIRD GRADE— Fall Term. 

Spelling — Words secured from lessons in other branches. Twelve 
words constitute a lesson. Every fifth lesson a review. Work cor- 
rected daily. Sherwood's Writing Speller. 

Reading — Phonics ten minutes daily. Tables of sonants, non- 
sonants, liquids. Read from Scudder's 'Fable, and Folk Lore," pp. 81- 
103, pp. 109-136, pp. 160-169, Stickney's Aesop's Fables, pp. 114-165. 
From "Heart of Oak" No. 2, read Ali Baba, Aladdin, Jack, the Giant 
Killer, The Children of the Wood. From Wiggin's "Story Hour'' read 
the First Thanksgiving Day and the Story of Christmas. 

Arithmetic — Thorough review of the tables in addition, subtrac- 
tion, and multiplication through 20. Addition of columns of numbers 
not larger then four-place. Fractions 1, &, i, ^. of all numbers to 100. 
Arabic notation and numeration through millions. Roman from 1-100. 

Multiplication tables, through the 8's. Subtract numbers as 
high as hundred-thousands. Multiply three-place numbers by one- 
place multiplier. Rapid mental work in addition £nd subtraction. 
Use present illustrative material. Do much concrete work. 

Geography— Excursions: A house in building; the canning factory: 
a garden in October; the farmer's harvest; the nursery (to see pack- 
ing); the feeding of cattle and the stockyards: views from the cupola 
of the I.S.N.U.; the campus slopes (model relief and drainage in 
sand); the relief of Miller Park; forest trees in Miller Park: the 
Bloomington Court House. All excursions described and discussed in 
class. Topics arranged in logical series and entered by each child in 
his Outline Book. 

Language — Lessons alternate with Geography. Two lessons in 
five are composition exercises based on topics drawn from the out- 
lines of Literature, Geography, Natural Science. Exercise great care 
in the use of correct English, in paragraphing, in teaching margin, 
capitalization, punctuation, in securing the best writing and spelling. 
Basis of oral work O. T. Bright's "Graded Instruction in English 1 " pp. 
1-22. Compositions and oral work accomplished in Child's Outline 
Book. 

Drawing — Clay-molding and drawing of leaves (sunflower, plan- 
tain, burdock, tulip, lilac); of fruits and vegetables (apple, potato, 
melon, pumpkin, tomato). Type solids, sphere, cube. Study accord- 
ing to Prang's Primary manual. Model objects based on same. 
(Croquet balls, strings of beads, cherries, building blocks). Drill ex- 



58 Annual Catalogue 

ercise on correct drawing of the horizontal and vertical lines and cir- 
cles. Position of body, paper, correct pencil-holding'. 

Writing — Forearm movement, correct position of body and paper. 
Normal review system (Vertical edition). Figures. Forms of i, u, 
w, n, m. Movement exercises each lesson (5 min.) Light touch. 

Natural Science— Cockle-bur, milkweed, jimson weed, thistle, cot- 
ton plant, grasshopper, bullfrog. 

Literature — Haw r thorne's "Wonder Book" entire. Oral presenta- 
tion. Outlines preserved in each child's Outline Book. 



Winter Term. 

Spelling— See plan for Fall Term. 

Reading — Phonics ten minutes daily. Review the consonant tables 
thoroughly. Add the short vowels. Mark words of one syllable. Read 
further from Scudder's "Fables and Folk Lore." Read McMurry's 
Robinson Crusoe. Ten stories from Andersen's Fairy Tales, First 
Series. From Wiggin's Story Hour, "Little George Washington." 

Arithmetic— Arabic notation and numeration through six orders. 
Roman through M. Multiplication tables through twelves. Multiply 
with multiplier of not more than three figures. Short divisions — 
divisors up to twelve. Much drill in rapid oral and written work in 
the four operations. Concrete work fifteen minutes daily. 

Geography — Excursions; feed-mill; carpenter shop; blacksmith 
shop; greenhouse (note system of heating especially): the town coun- 
cil: the policeman; the nursery (to see grafting); the garret of the 
Practice School; our boiler house to study our system of heating and 
ventilation. All fully discussed in the class; false notions corrected. 
Outlines preserved. Oral presentation of Andrew's "Seven Little 
Sisters." Study of the world-whole and the chief land masses. 

Language — Composition plan the same as for the Fall Term. 
Basis of oral instruction, Bright's Graded Instruction in English, 
Second Year, and DeGarmo's Language Work, No. 2; use first and 
second part. Give extended practice in use. 

Drawing — Plan the same as for the Fall Term. To the type solids 
add the cylinder and cone. Study and draw views and appearance 
above and below the level of the eye. Draw objects based on the 
solids. Secure good gray lines. Once in two weeks a dictation ex- 
ercise. 

Natural Science--The stars and large constellations. The moon 
and Lts changes. Iron and its uses. Tin, banana, geranium, begonias, 
roses, carnations, Lilies. Coffee and tea plants. 



Illinois State Normal University. 59 

Writing — Advance with the one-space letters as rapidly as class 
will permit. Write words containing these letters. Five-minute 
movement exercise daily. 

Literature — Hawthorne's "Tanglewood Tales" complete. Oral 
presentation. 

Spring Term. 

Spelling — Plan the same as for Fall Term. 

Reading — Thorough review of all phonic tables; add the long 
vowels and diphthongs; marking of dissyllables (ten minutes daily). 
Furnish iEsop's Fables and Andersen's Fairy Tales— first series. Con- 
tinue "Heart of Oak," No. 2. Memorize selections from Open Sesame, 
Vol. I. 

Arithmetic — Review the multiplication tables. Multiply with 
multipliers not more than four figures. Review short division. Long 
division, divisors not to exceed 25. Frequent drill in rapid oral and 
written work in the fundamental operations. Cook and Cropsey pp. 
123-160. In solving problems teach the children to see given ele- 
ments, the nature of the required quantity, and the operations to be 
performed to obtain the latter. 

Geography — Excursions: Grocery; shoemaker's shop; tin shop; 
planing mil 1 ; wagon shop; machine shop; electric light plant; station 
agent's work; telegraph agent's work; C. A. & St. L. R. R. shops. 
Plan of discussion noted in Fall Term. Andrew's Seven Little Sisters 
continued. Continue study of the world whole. 

Language — Composition plan same as noted in Fall Term. Letter 
writing. Oral work based on Bright's Third Year. 

Drawing — Drawing and modeling of leaves, twigs, fruits, vegeta- 
bles. Study the hemisphere by comparison with previous solids 
studies. Model Agoonack's house; meat block; toad stool. Draw on 
and below the level of the eye. Draw a bowl. 

Writing — Finish thoroughly the one-space letters. Work for 
freedom and speed. Review figures. Movement exercise daily. 

Science — The robin, woodpecker, bluebird, chicken. 

Literature— Lamb's "Adventures of Ulysses," Church's "Story of 
the Iliad." 

SECOND GRADE. 
Literature— First Term— Fall. 
Robinson Crusoe, chapters 1-10. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Robinson Crusoe, Chapters 11-20. 



60 Annual Catalogue 

Third Term— Spring. 
Robinson Crusoe, chapters 21-29. 

For method of teaching" see Robinson Crusoe for "Boys and Girls, " 
Teachers 1 Edition. 

NATURE STUDY. 
First Term— Fall. 
(a) Continue and complete study of apple and plum begun in 
spring. 

{b) The Grape, ripened fruit on vine. 

(c) Watermelon and Muskmelon from flower to fruit. 

(d) Cabbage butterfly. 

(e) Caterpillars frequenting any of the trees previously studied 
or the grape. 

(0 Turtle. 
(g) Wheat. 

Second Term -Winter. 

(a) Snow Crystals. 

(b) Salt, sulphur, and quartz Crystals by comparisons with snow 
crystals. 

(c) Parrot. 

(d) Crow and owl by comparison with parrot. 

(e) Goat (by comparison with sheep, if the latter has already 
been studied). 

(/) Arrival of early spring- birds —time noted. 

(g) Watch for any chang-e in the buds of soft maple, elm, and 
two willow trees, one with pollen bearing flowers, the other with seeds. 

Third Term— Spring. 

(a) Continuation of study of trees as in (g) above. 

(b) Blue birds and yellow-winged woodpeckers. 

(c) Seeds of melon, orange, lemon, and grape sown. Watch de- 
velopment. 

(d) Grape— buds and blossoms. 

(e) Violet. 

(/) Honey bee. 

READING FOR THE YEAR. 

(a) "Classic stories for the Little Ones/' 

(b) Nature stories for Young Readers," Vol. I and II, connected 
with Nal lire Study. 

(c) Poems connected with Literature and Nature Study. 

ith Grimm's Fairy Tales, Vol. I, Wiltse. For method see Mc- 
Murry's Special Method in Beading. 



Illinois State Normal University. 61 

NUMBER FOR THE YEAR. 

(a) Forty-five facts in addition, part of this being" review. 

(b) Addition of single columns of figures by grasping the tens, 
sum not to exceed 20; thus, add 7, 4, 3, 2; the children see a ten in the 
seven and the three, which put with the four and two makes sixteen- 

(c) Addition of two-place numbers, sum of neither column to ex- 
ceed nine. 

(d) Since 3+4 = 7, 13+4 = 17, and 23+4=27, etc. Similar addi- 
tions carried to 100. 

(e) Understanding of all two-place numbers as composed of tens 
and units. 

(/) Subtractions suggested by (a) and (c). 

(g) Figures, Roman numerals, and names of numbers, 10-100. 

(h) All tables of compound numbers in common use not already 
learned in first year. The latter tables reviewed. 

(i) Divisions, Multiplications, and Partitions, 10-20. 

(./) Multiplication tables of 2's, 5's and 10's. This work is largely 
concrete, the Nature Study and Literature furnishing material for 
the problems. 

Hall's arithmetic reader is used in Review. 

WRITING FOR THE YEAR. 
Capital letters singly and in proper nouns taken from the other 
studies e. g. A — April. B— Barri. C— Crusoe. Upright script. 

WRITTEN LANGUAGE. 

(a) Stories based on Nature Study and Literature, the sentences 
being" connected in thought. 

(b) Poems copied. 

(c) Short stories reproduced by children as tests. In addition to 
the points insisted upon in the first year, the children learn to para- 
graph. 

SPELLING. 

Words needed for Written Language spelled phonetically and 
written. Many sentences are dictated in reviewing" the spelling of 
the words. 

First Primary— Literature. 

First Term— Fall. Stories 1-6 in "Classic Stories for the Little 
Ones." 

Second Term — Winter. Stories 7-11. 

Third Term— Spring. Stories 12-15. 

Nature Study— First Term. Fall. 



62 • Annual Catalogue 

1. Life History of Dog, Cow, Sheep, Squirrel, Rabbit, Mouse, Rat. 
2. Preparation of familiar trees with large buds as walnut, hickory, 
buckeye, and poplars, for winter rest, associated with gathering of 
autumn leaves. 

Second Term — Winter. 1. Winter study of Austrian Pine as 
type of Evergreen Trees. 2. Scotch Pine, Hemlock, and Norway 
Spruce by comparison with Austrian Pine. 3. Horse, Cat. 4. Chicken 
(type of birds). 

Third Term— Spring. 1. Plant seeds of Lima bean, sweet peas, 
and corn, watch development throughout term. 2. Buds of Apple, 
Cherry, and Plum. This study is begun before the buds are swollen 
at all. The study of the cherry is continued until cherries are ripe, 
and the other fruits are watched throughout the term. 3. Duck 
(type of water bird). 4. Goose by comparison with the duck. 

Reading, First Term— Fall. 1. Selection from "Verse and Prose 
for Beginners." 2. Cyr's Primer, pp. 1-25. 

Second Term — Winter. 1. Selections from "Verse and Prose for 
Beginners." 2. Cyr's Primer, completed. 3. ^Esop's Fables adapted. 

Third Term— Spring. 1. Selections from "Verse and Prose." 
2. Selections from "Nature Stories for Young Readers." 3. Poems 
from the board on printed slips. 

Phonics, First Term— Fall. Sounds of simple short vowels; sounds 
of consonants in common use, only one sound being given to the letter. 

Second Term — Winter. Simple long sounds of vowels; consonant 
sounds not previously learned. Diphthongs. Sounds marked this 
term. 

Third Term — Spring. All sounds in use by the children not prev- 
iously learned. 

Writing, First Term— Fall. The simplest letters, such as i, u, w, 
n, m, etc. in upright script. These combined into words which the 
children have learned to recognize in reading. 

Second and Third Terms— Winter and Spring. Remainder of 
small letters, used in words as above indicated. 

Number- First Year. 

1. Combinations through ten learned largely in the Science work. 

2. Many concrete problems dealing with Literature and Science 
— topics. 

Written Language— First Year. 
(a) Names of objects studied in Literature and Science, {b) Short 
stories derived from the same source. All sentences begun with cap- 
ital letters and closed with a period. 



Illinois State Normal University. 63 

Drawing— The First Two Years. 

(a) Drawing" of objects studied in Science, the object being 
placed before the child, he doing his best to represent it. 

Some of these objects are molded, as the eg'gs and nest of the 
robin, beans and peas in the pod, the horse's shoe, the chicken's foot, 
cones of the pine. 

Some are also cut from colored papers and pasted, the children 
themselves matching colors, e. g., leaves on an apple twig, the ripened 
fruit of the apple, cherry, and plums, beans in the pod. 

(b) The stories which the children learn and Robinson Crusoe 
are illustrated by them, they representing - on paper what is in their 
minds, e. (/., they picture the little fir tree in its home in the forest, 
the rabbit jumping over it. Robinson Crusoe is pictured in his home 
with his little animal family about him. 

Spelling— First Year. 
Phonetic and written spelling of words used -in the Written Lan- 
guage. 



64 



Annual Catalogue 



The Two-Year Course. 

Graduates of approved high schools, or persons possessing- equiv- 
[ alent qualifications, will be admitted to the following- course : 

SECOND YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

/ Advanced Psychology, 20 hours 
per month. 
Illustrative Teaching", 12 hours 
per month. 
( English Literature, 20 hours per 
month. 
Civil Government. 18 hours per 
month. 
/ Physics, 20 hours per month. 

SECOND TERM. 

/ Advanced Psychology, 20 hours 

per month. 
';/ Illustrative Teaching, 12 hours 
per month. 
i Practice Teaching, 20 hours per 

month. 
| Shakespeare and Themes, 20 
hours per month. 
Geometry, 18 hours per month. 



FIRST YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Reading, 18 hours per month. 
Arithmetic, 18 hours per month. 
^Elementary Psychology, 18 hours 
per month. 
..-Zoology, 18 hours per month. 
^"Elements of Pedagogy, 8 hours 
per month. 
Drawing, 8 hours per month. 

SECOND TERM. 

Pedagogy, 18 hours per month. 
English Grammar, 18 hours per 

month. 
Geography, 18 hours per month. 
I Ancient History, 18 hours per 
month. 
- Drawing, 8 hours per month. 
J^#Practice Teaching, 20 hours per 
month. 



THIRD TERM. 

Philosophy of Education, 20 

hours per month. 
Illustrative Teaching, 12 hours 

per month. 
Practice Teaching, 20 hours per 

month. 
Physical Geography, 18 hours 

per month. 
Bookkeeping and School Law, 

20 hours per month. 

The two-year pupils recite with the three-year pupils. The ex- 
planation of the course of study, consequently, applies to both courses. 



THIRD TERM. 

f Pedagogy, 18 hours per month. 
English Literature, 18 hours per 
month. 
/^Algebra, 18 hours per month. 
I lotany, 18 hours per month. 
/Practice Teaching, 20 hours 

per month. 
Drawing, 8 hours per month. 
- Vocal Music, 8 hours per month. 



Illinois State Normal University. 



65 



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Illinois State Normal University. 67 



The Christian Associations. 



There are two such societies, one for young men, Y.M.C.A.; and 
one for young - women, Y.W.C.A. While they are separate organi. 
zations, union meetings are regularly held. As their name implies, 
they are Christian associations. All members of evangelical churches 
may become active members, while others may become associate 
members. 

The work of these associations is many-sided, including religious 
devotion, instruction and study, missionary work, social culture, and 
the furtherance of religious culture and work along all lines. On the 
one side the body of students has in these societies the best opportu- 
nity for religious growth, organization, and social contact, and on the 
other the Sunday schools and churches are reinforced by the work of 
the-societies. 

The devotional meetings consist of prayer meetings, held each 
Tuesday evening by each of the associations, and a union meeting of 
the two each Sunday afternoon at four o'clock. The Tuesday evening 
meetings are conducted by the students, while the Sunday afternoon 
meetings are led sometimes by the pastors of the churches, sometimes 
by teachers or students of the Normal school. 

The Bible-study class meets each Friday evening. For some years 
it has been conducted by Dr. E. C. Hewett, ex-President of the Nor- 
mal School. It consists of a careful and comparative stud}' of the 
Bible testimony or important religious topics. 

The sociables given near the opening of each term furnish oppor- 
tunity to the new students to become acquainted with each other and 
with older students, thus introducing them to the religious and social 
life of the school. 

The associations cultivate systematically the mission spirit, and 
carry on some of its work. The students raise annually three hundred 
dollars with which, in co-operation with five of the churches in the 
town, five native missionaries are supported in foreign fields. A 
students volunteer band is made up of those who intend eventually 
to enter upon the work in foreign fields. A missionary study class 
meets each Friday afternoon. The library of the Normal School has 
also been supplied, through the efforts of the associations, with a 
collection of forty-five volumes of missionary literature. 

Students are welcomed at all the meetings of the associations, 
and to its opportunities for -religious devotion and culture. 



68 Annual Catalogue 



The Oratorical Association. 



This association had its origin in the winter term of 1889, the 
prime mover being" Mr. Charles Beach, an enterprising student. 
Annual contests were held until the present school year when the 
association sent a representative to a meeting of delegates from the 
Normal schools of Kansas, Iowa, Illinois, and Missouri, who met for 
the purpose of organizing an Inter-State League of Normal Schools. 
As a result of that meeting an association was formed and the first 
oratorical contest was held at Warrensburg, Mo., May 8, 1896. 

Five states sent contestants, viz: Wisconsin, Kansas, Illinois, 
Iowa, Missouri. The honors were awarded in the order named The 
contestant from Illinois was Robert J. Wells, a student in this school. 
Although Mr. Beach left the school several years ago, his interest in 
the association is evinced by the fact that he has made provision for 
an annual prize of one hundred dollars and a gold medal for the winner 
of the preliminary contest, the same to be known as the Beach prize. 



Illinois State Normal University. 









1 896. 


-- 




1 8 9 T. 


SEPTEMBER 


JANUARY. 


APRIL. 




S 


M 


T 


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OCTOBER. 


FEBRUARY. 


MAY. 




I 


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2| 3 




1| 2 


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51 6 














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::!:. 


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31 


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NOVEMBER. 


MARCH 


JUNE. 


1| 2 


3, 4 


5 


6 


7 




1| 2 3 


4 


51 






11 2 3, 4 


5 


8 9 


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26 


29 30 


::|:: 










28 


29 30 31 




::|:: 


27 


28 


29,30 . . 1 . . 




DECEMBER. 








1| 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8, 9 


10 


11 


12 






13 


II 


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31 


::!■: 







60 






Calendar for 1896=97. 

The school year of 39 weeks is divided into three terms. 

The first term of 15 weeks begins on Monday, September 14, 1896, 
and closes on Thursday, December 24. Examinations at the close of 
the term. Annual Contest of Literary Societies on Thursday evening", 
December 24. Semi-annual meeting of the Board of Education on 
Wednesday, December 9. 

Vacation of one week. 

The second term begins on Monday, January 4, 1897, and closes on 
Thursday, March 25. Examinations at the end of the term. 

Vacation of one week. 

The third term begins on Monday, April 5, and closes on Wednes- 
day, June 23. Examinations during the last week of the term. Annual 
meeting of the Alumni June 23. Annual meeting of the Board of Ed- 
ucation on Wednesday, June 23. Commencement exercises on Thurs- 
day, June 24. 

Vacation of eleven weeks. 

The new school year opens on Monday, September, 13, 1897. 



Annua I Cata logue 



Pupil Teachers. 



First Class.* 



ARBOGAST, ANNA B. 
ARBOGAST. SADIE E. 
BLAND, ROSE 
BULLOCK, JESSIE 
CAMPBELL, FLORA E. 
CARPENTER, MRS. CARRIE M. 
CHENOWETH, LILLIAN 
CHISHOLM, EVA MAY 
CLANAHAN, LUCY 
CLANAHAN, MYRTLE 
COEN, RUAH 
DANIELS, OZELLO 
DICKEY, DAISIE D. 
GRAINEY, JESSIE A. 
HARPSTRITE, EMMA F. 
HARRIS, ELLA M. 
HIMES, JESSIE M. 

ARNETT, JAMES H. 
BLACK, JESSE 
BOGARDUS, FRANK 
CAVINS, ELZYC. 
COWAN, ALAN D. 
COHAGAN, ALBERT C. 
FOX, HARRY B. 
GALLAHER, LOUIS 
GREAVES, THOMAS H. 
KANAGA, HERSCHEL E. 
LAW, CHARLES T. 
LEHMAN, PAUL 
MARTIN, WILLIAM 
MEIER, WM. H. D. 



HOBART, MARY FLORENCE 
HOLLY, LAURA 
KATES, CHARLOTTE M. 
KUHNS, ADA 
MICHAELIS, EDNA 
MIZE, EDITH 
MOULTON, MARIA E. 
NIXON, ANNA C. 
PERRY, PEARL 
QUIGG, IVA M. 
SABIN, MARY E. 
SCHAEFFER, ELIZABETH T. 
SIMMONS, NORA 
STEAGALL, MARY M. 
SWISHER, GRACE 
TRAVER, RUBY 

MEYER, OTTO 
NEWMAN, ORRIS 
PAGE, JOHN T. 
PATCH, FRED 
PIKE, NELSON D. 
PRICE, HARRY B. 
PRICER, CHARLES A. 
QUICK, EDWARD W. 
SHAUB, PHILIP H. 
STRONG, JOHN A. 
THORNHILL, ERNEST A. 
WHETSEL, WM. J. 
WORLEY, ROBERT E. 



♦The first class consists of those who have taught four full terms of approved 
work in the Practice School. The second class has taught three terms, the third 
class two terms, and the fourth class one term in the Practice School. 



Illinois State Normal University. 



71 



Second Class. 



BEGGS, DOROTHEA 
COOPER, MABEL 
CURTIS, S. MACY 
DANIEL, LEONA 
HISEL, GERTRUDE 
JOHNSTON, G. MAUDE 
KAISER, WILHELMINE 
LESEM, REBEKAH 
LIGGITT, MYRTLE 
MILLER, EMILY 
ASHWORTH, ELMER 
BROWN, BENJAMIN 
BUMGARNER, JOSEPH 
MIZE, ROY 



NUCKOLLS, MINNIE 
PHILLIPS, ALICE 
PLUMxMER, LUCY 
PORTER, GEORGIA 
ROBERTS, LOIS 
SIKKEMA, ALICE 
TRIMBLE, CLARA 
WILLIAMS, JULIA 
WRIGHT, EMILY 

PIKE, WALTER 
PRICER, JOHN 
WELLS, ROBERT 



Third Class. 



BARBER, MARY 
BOWMAN, BERTHA 
CAMPBELL, EVA 
COLBY, LYDIA 
COLE, STELLA 
COOPER, NETTIE 
DAHL, LORENA 
DAVIS, MARY 
DeWOLP, NELLIE 
DOOLEY, GERTRUDE 
EDMUNDS, ELMA 
FAIRFIELD, ETTIE 
FELTON, JESSIE 
FLETCHER, MARY 
HALL, ELIZABETH 
HENAUGHAN, MARY ELLEN 
HILTS, LAURA 
HINCKLEY, RUTH 
HUNT, FANNY FERN 
ILIFF, FRANCES 
IMBODEN, SARAH 
JONES, ALICE 
KING, ANNA 
LANGE, OTTILIE 
McCORD, GRACE 
McCREA, EDITH 



McELHENIE, ESTELLA 
MOON, EVA 
MOORE, MARY 
NORMINGTON, FLAVILLA 
OGLE, FAY 
PARKER, LEONORA 
PEARSON, IDA 
PECK, OLIVE 
PORTER, EVA 
RIGGS, MRS. L. D. 
ROGERS, ANN ELIZA 
ROGERS, LYDIA 
SMITH, KATHERINE 
SMITH, NANO 
SNELL, CLARA 
STEVENSON, BESSIE 
THOMPSON, MARY 
TRAINER, AMANDA 
TRAVIS, CARRIE 
TURNBULL, HARRIET 
WARNER, MRS. CARRIE 
WATKINS, PEARL 
WILSON, ESTELLA 
WOMACKS, NITA 
WORLEY, ARABELLA 



72 



Annual Catalogue 



BORSCH, JOHN 
BOWMAN, F. C. 



ABBOTT, LILLIAN 
BABBITT, ELLEN 
BAKER, CORA ETHEL 
BAKER, ESTELLE 
BAKER, LOU 
BALLER, BLANCHE 
BIRKENBEUEL, CARRIE 
BLAND, HATTIE 
BRANDES, BERTHA 
BRUCE, ALICE 
CAMPBELL, PRUDENCE 
CARROLL, MARIE 
CASS, MATTLE 
CAUGHEY, ADELAIDE 
COWLES, BESSIE 
CROWDER, LIZZIE 
DARBY, GERTRUDE 
DEBO, MARY 
EWBANK, LEORA 
FENTON, GRACE 
FLEMING, LALA 
FLEMING, LULA 
FLINN, SARAH 
FOLEY, MINERVA 
FOWLER, LILLIE 
FUHRMAN, EFFIE 
GATONS, ALICE 
GERBER, MINNIE 
GRAY, SARAH 
GREGORY, KATHERINE 
GRIFFIN, GRACE 
HAMILTON, INA 
HIGGINS, CORINNE 
HUMPHREY, AN ABEL 
KELLER, HANNAH 
LOVETT, NELLIE 
LURTON, BLANCHE 

BAKER, GEORGE 
DAWSON, RUSSEL 



ECHOLS, CHESTER M. 
PATTINGILL, IRA 



Fourth Class. 



LYONS, ALICE 
MeCREA, IDA 
McTIER, ASENITH 
McWHERTER, MARY 
MERCER, LESLIE 
MILLER, LURA 
MINARD, MAUD 
MITCHELL, MARTHA 
MONROE, GRACE 
MOORE, OLIVE 
PIKE, EFFIE 
PITTS, HENRIETTA 
PRYCE, FANNY 
PUTNEY, LUCY 
RAMBO, JESSIE 
REID, LELA 

RIEDELBAUCH,CHARLOTTE 
ROSS, SILVA 
ROZIENE, ADDIE 
SCHOFIELD, MARIETTA 
SEELEY, GRACE 
SHEPARD, ANNA 
SMITH, CORA 
SULLIVAN, MARY 
TAYLOR, HELEN 
TAYLOR, VIRGINIA 
TREGELLAS, FLORENCE 
TROXEL, MABEL 
VAIL, FANNY JANE 
WALTERS, FLORENCE 
WARD, ISABELLE 
WETZEL, CLARA 
WHITE, DAISY 
WILLIAMS, ELSIE 
WILSON, ALMA 
WRIGHT, EDNA 

DENNIS, HERBERT 
EASTWOOD, UYUON 



Illinois State Normal University. 



7 3 



HESTER, ARTHUR 
HUNT, GEORGE 
LIGGITT, FLEMMING 
LIVINGSTON, SAMUEL 
McKINNEY, JOHN 
MOULTON, GEORGE 
PARKER, B. F. 



SANDERS, WILLIAM 
WARNER, PERRY 
WELLES, WINTHROP 
WIGHT, AMBROSE 
WILLIAMS, JEREMIAH 
WOLF, ALFRED 
YOUNG, NOAH 



First Class, - 
Second Class, 
Third Class, 
Fourth Class, 



Summary, 



65 
26 
55 
91 



Total, 



237 



74 



Annual Catalogue 



Students. 



Post=Graduate and Special. 




NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE 


Cowles, Katherine Louise 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Lesem, Rebekah 


Adams, 


Quincy 


Plummer, Lucy Koogler 


* McLean, 


Heyworth 


Riggs, Mrs. Lilla Delle 


*McLean, 


Bloomington 


Kirk, William E. 


*McLean, 


Bloomington 


Posey, Chessley Justin 


Clinton, 


Carlyle 


Wight, Ambrose Benson 


Be Witt, 


Waynesville 



Senior Class. 

Arbogast, Anna Belle McLean, 

Arbogast, Sadie Emma McLean, 

Bland, Rose Shelby, 

Bullock, Jessie Jane Woodford, 

Campbell, Flora Evangeline Adams, 

Carpenter, Mrs. Carrie Maria Putnam, 

Chenoweth, Lillian Champaign, 

Chisholm, Eva May Be Witt, 

Clanahan, Lucy Maud Pope, 

Clanahan, Myrtle Pope, 

Coen, Ruah * McLean, 

Dickey, Daisie Delle Henry, 

Eldred, Alice Irene *Grundy, 

Grainey, Jessie Agnes Madison, 

Harpstrite, Emma Flora Macon, 

Harris, Ella Mabel Bock Island, 

Himes, Jessie May McLean, 

Hobart, Mary Florence Iroquois, 

♦These names marked with a star are names of persons who have given their 
pledge of intention to teach and who are pursuing the regular Normal Course: 
DUt, Dy reason of residence in McLean county, or wishing to be free to teach in 
other "states, or because not of Legal age, they have not been admitted to the Nor- 
mal School as state beneficiaries. They pay tuition as Model students, at the rate 
of $32 a year. 



Normal 

Normal 

tihelbyville 

Eureka 

Camp Point 

Henry 

Osman 

Farmer City 

Golconda 

Golconda 

Normal 

Kewanee 

Gardner 

$}dwardsville 

Decatur 

Moline 

Normal 

Gilman 



Illinois State Normal University. 



75 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Holly, Laura Helen LaSalle, 

Kates, Charlotte Marguerite McLean, 

Kuhns, Ada Anna McLean, 

Moulton, Maria Electa Kendall, 

Nixon, Anna Caruthers St. Clair, 

Perry, Pearl Myrtle Livingston, 

Quigg, Iva Mae *Tazewell, 

Reid, Lela Belle * McLean, 

Ruhl, Adah Myrtle *DeWitt, 
Sabin, Mary Esther Will, 

Schaeffer, Elizabeth Taylor *McLean, 

Steagall, Mary Minerva Pope, 

Traver, Ruby Linda DuPage, 

Black, Jesse Tazewell, 

Bogardus, Frank Smith Sangamon, 

Gavins, Elzy Cartwright Coles, 

Cohagan, Albert Crouse Peoria, 

Cowan, Alan Dewain Mason, 

Fox, Harry Bert LaSalle, 

Gallaher, Lewis Theron Putnam. 

Greaves, Thomas Henry Shelby, 

Kanaga, Herschel Edward Christian, 

Knott, William Ernest *McLcan, 

Law, Charles Thomas Christian, 

Lehman, Paul Harris Adams, 
Meier, William Herman Dietrich Scott, 

Meyer, Otto Sylvester DeKalb, 

O'Neil, James Edward * McLean, 

Page, John Thomas Williams Macoupin, 

Page, Joseph Lewis ^Macoupin, 

Peairs, Ralph Plummer *McLean, 

Pike, Nelson Davidson Madison, 

Price, Harry Brusha Shelby, 

Pricer, Charles Aubert Vermilion, 

Prince, Edward Percy ^McLean, 

Quick, Edward William Bock Island, 

Shaub, Philip Harmon Madison, 
Strong, John Arthur Warren, 

Thornhill, Ernest Algier Christian, 

Whetsel, William Jackson Woodford, 

Worley, Robert Edwin Woodford, 



POSTOFPICE 

Peru 

Bloomington 

'Bloomington 

Pavilion 

Marissa 

Cornell 

Minier 

Arrowsmith 

Clinton 

Wilmington 

Normal 

Golconda 

Wheaton 

Green Valley 

Springfield 

Etna 

Peoria 

Easlon 

Peru 

Mt. Palatine 

Moawequa 

Taylorville 

Normal 

Rosamond 

Payson 

Riggston 

KirkJand 

Bloomington 

Girard 

Girard 

Normal 

St, Jacobs 

Oconee 

Potomac 

Bloomington 

Hillsdale 

Marine 

Roseville 

Taylorville 

Secor 

M Paso 



7<i 



Annual Catalogue 



Students who have Completed Two Years' Work or More. 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Aldrich, Blanche *McLean, 

Baker, Cora Ethel Shelby, 

Baker, Estelle Katherine St. Clair, 

Bailer, Blanche C. * McLean, 

Bland, Hattie Shelby, 

Bowman, Bertha Ann Bock Island, 

Boyce Eva Belle McLean, 

Campbell, Prudence Overton Fulton, 

Cleveland, Lida Taylor *McLean, 

Cooper, Mabel Anna Jo Daviess, 

Cooper, Annetta Belle McLean, 

Curtis, S. Macy *McLean, 

Dahl, Lorena Putnam, 

Daniel, Leona St. Clair, 

Fairfield, Etta Melissa McLean, 

Fenton, Grace Vermilton, 

Fletcher, Mary Carroll, 

Hall, Elizabeth Twining- McLean, 

Hamblin, Mrs. Frank Ambrose Knox, 

Hilts, Erne McLean, 

Hilts, Laura McLean, 

Hinckley, Zenobia Ruth St. Clair, 

Hisel, Anna Gertrude McLean, 

Iliff, Frances Mary * Woodford, 

Jones, Alice Louise Kankakee, 

Kaiser, Wilhelmine Piatt, 

Lange, Ottilie Meta McLean, 

Liggitt, Myrtle Margaret Livingston, 

Lovett, Nellie McLean, 

Lurton, Blanche Jersey, 

McElhenie, Mary Estella LaSalle, 

Michaelis, Edna Bell Hancock, 

Miller, Emily Piatt Lake, 

Mize, Edith Belle Madison, 

Monroe, Grace Adela McLean, 

Moon, Eva Mary Douglas, 

Nance, May Kill gene McDonough, 

Newman, Mrs. .Jennie Edgar, 
Normington, Flavilla Winnebago, 

Nuckolls, Minnie Sangamon, 

Patterson, Elsie * McLean, 



POSTOFFICE 

Normal 

Prairie Home 

Belleville 

Bloominqton 

Shelbyville 

Bock Island 

Bloomington 

Lewistown 

Normal 

Hanover 

Normal 

Normal 

Granville 

Belleville 

Normal 

Danville 

Milledgeville 

Downs 

Galesburg 

Towanda 

Towanda 

Belleville 

Weston 

Washington 

Kankakee 

Atwood 

Bloomington 

Nevada 

Arrowsmith 

Newbern 

LaSalle 

Plymouth 

Waukegan 

Manix 

Leroy 

Tuscola 

Bushnell 

Metcalf 

Durand 

Auburn 

Normal 



Illinois State Normal School. 



77 



NAMES. 

Phillips, Alice Frances 
Pike, Effie 

Pitts, Henrietta Betsey 
Porter, Georgia Lee 
Riedelbauch, Charlotte 
Roberts, Lois Madeline 
Rogers, Eliza Ann 
Rose, Ida Bertha 
Roziene, Addie 
Schlatterer, Ella 
Schlatterer, Laura 
Sikkema, Amelia Alice 
Simeral, Esther M. 
Simmons, Nora Mae 
Smith, Nano Pearl 
Snell, Clara May 
Stevenson, Bessie Bedell 
Sullivan, Mary Ellen 
Swifeher, Grace Eugenia 
Taylor, Helen Mary 
Travis, Carrie Estelle 
Warner, Mrs. Carrie 
Watkins, Pearl 
Williams, Julia 
Wright, Emilie 
Youle, Jessie Lee 

Allen, Charles Henry 
Arnett, James Horatio 
Ashworth, Arthur Elmer 
Bright, Bruce 
Bumgarner, Joseph 
Burtis, Clyde Lewis 
Carson, Franklin Benjamin 
Covey, Hyatt Elmer 
Echols, Chester Madison 
Hinckle, Luther Calvin 
Hoff, George Stephen 
Hunt, George Warren 
Johnson, John Thomas 
Johnson, Riley Oren 
McKinney, John Robert 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE 


Vermilion, 


Danville 


Madison, 


St. Jacobs 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Hudson 


Peoria, 


Glasford 


Macon, 


Decatur 


Jefferson, 


Mt. Vernon 


Monroe, 


Columbia 


Cook, 


Irving Park 


DeKalb, 


Sycamore 


DeKalb, 


Sycamore 


St. Clair, 


Belleville 


^McLean, 


Bloomington 


Hancock, 


Joetta 


Ogle, 


Creston 


Carroll, 


Milledgeville 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Vermilion, 


Danville 


*McLean, 


Bloomington 


Shelby, 


Prairie Home 


Marion, 


Salem 


McLean, 


Chenoa 


(Missouri,) 


Hannibal 


Iroquois, 


Watseka 


McLean, 


Saybrook 


Shelby, 


Oconee 


(Ohio,) 


New Market 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Putnam, 


Mt. Palatine 


* McLean , 


Hudson 


Washington, 


Bichview 


*McLean, 


Leroy 


Hamilton, 


McLeansboro 


Macoupin, 


Girard 


Vermilion, 


Danville 


Fulton, 


Ipava 


Perry, 


DuQuoin 


Coles, 


Hindsboro 


Christian, 


Assumption 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. 

Marquis, Chester DuBois 
Martin, William Woodrow 
Mize, Addison Roy 
Moulton, George, Dykeman 
Newman, Orris Hayden 
Pattingill, Ira 
Patch, Fred Granville 
Percy, Ernest Howard 
Pike, Walter Franklin 
Pricer, John Lossen 
Rodgers, Bert Clarence 
Sanders, William Solon 
Stewart, Frank 
Thayer, Eugene Aretas 
Warner, Perry Woodson 
Welles, Winthrop Selden 
Wells, Robert John 
Whitten, John Hamilton 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Tazewell, 


Green Valley 


Madison, 


Manix 


Kendall, 


Pavilion 


Henry, 


Nekoma 


Shelby, 


Oconee 


Warren, 


Roseville 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Madison, 


St. Jacobs 


Vermilion, 


Potomac 


'^McLean, 


Bloomington 


Gallatin, 


Cottonwood 


Crawford, 


Oblong 


Ford, 


Sibley 


Marion, 


Salem 


Champaign, 


Penfield 


Perry, 


Pinckneyville 


Stark, 


Castleton 



Students who have Completed One Year's Work or More, but not 

Two Years. 



Andrews, Elizabeth 

Aronson, Hilma Augusta 

Babbitt, Ellen C. 

Babcock, Jennie 

Babbs, Mary Irene 

Baker, Lou 

Barber, Mary Fisher 

Barnard, Ada Arvesta 

Barnard, Ida C. 

Bartlett. Lula Mae 

Beggs, Dorothea Katherine 

Benbrook, Mrs. Ida Triplett, 

Berry, Willis Elma 

Birkenbeuel, Carrie 

Blair, Emily 

Blair, M. Nettie 

Bowling, Margaret May 

Brandes, Berl ha 

Bright, Bernice A lena 



Vermilion, 


State Line, Ind. 


Mercer, 


Aledo 


Cook, 


Chicago 


Fulton, 


lpava 


Coles, 


Fair Grange 


*McLean, 


Downs 


Stephenson, 


Freeport 


McLean. 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


DeKalb, 


Rollo 


(Colorado,) 


Denver 


Pike, 


nitsfield 


Pike, 


Pleasant If ill 


La S(dle, 


Peru 


Tazewell, 


Delavan 


Tazewell, 


Mackinaw 


Gnl latin, 


Equality 


Whiteside, 


Lyndon 


* Mr Lean, 


Normal 



Illinois State Normal University. 



7!) 



NAMES. 
Broadhead, Annie Maple 
Bruce, Alice May 
Campbell, Eva Lorena 
Campbell, Martha 
Carroll, Marie Louise 
Caugfhey, Adeline Olive 
Chicken, Sada Rosanna 
Clancy, Nellie Gertrude 
Colby, Lydia 
Cole, Stella Antoinette 
Collen, Laura May 
Corbett, Jennie Elizabeth 
Cowles, Bertha Ruth 
Cowles, Bessie Abiah 
Croskey, Anna Alice 
Crouch, Katherine 
Crouch, Rachel Pierson 
Crowder, Louise 
Crowder, Mary Lizzie 
Daehler, Elizabeth 
Dale, Christina Lorena 
Dale, Elizabeth 
Daniel, Ozello Harriet 
Darby, Gertrude 
Darling, Etta Marie 
Davis, Mary 
Debo, Mary Helen 
de Wolfe, Nellie Blanche 
Dillon, Mertie May 
Dooley, Gertrude 
Eddy, Meda M. 
Edmunds, Elma Ruth 
Fairfield, Grace 
Farmer, Rhoda Saletha 
Faulk, Harriet Belle 
Feehery, Alice 
Feehery, Josephine 
Fell, Edith Eva 
Felton, Jessie 
Fennessy, Effie Dorothea 
Fincham, Nellie 
Flaherty, Grace 
Fleischer, Ida Lena 



COUNTY. 

Tazewell, 

Logan, 

Fulton, 

Fulton, 

McLean, 

Rock Island, 

Woodford, 

McLean, 

Henry, 

Lake, 

Mc Henry, 

Macon, 
*McLean, 

Kankakee, 

DeWitt, 

Henderson, 

Henderson, 

McLean, 

Macon, 

Carroll, 

Champaign, 
* Vermilion, 

St. Clair, 

Sangamon, 

McHenry, 

Macon, 

LaSalle, 

DeKalb, 

* McLean, 
Will, 
Bureau, 

* Grundy, 
* McLean, 

Marion, 

McLean, 

Livingston, 

Livingston, 

Lee, 
* McLean, 

Fulton, 

McLean, 

McLean, 
*McLean, 



POSTOFFICE 

Mackinaw 

Beason 

Lewistown 

Lewistown 

Normal 

Coal Valley 

Secor 

Bloomington 

Atkinson 

Waukegan 

Crystal Lake 

Niantic 

Bloomington 

Kankakee 

Farmer City 

Rosetta 

Rosetta 

Normal 

Illiopolis 

Chadwick 

Mahomet 

Danville 

Belleville 

Springfield 

Union 

Decatur 

Peru 

Sandwich 

Normal 

Joliet 

Wyanet 

Gardner 

Normal 

Patoka 

Normal 

Campus 

Campus 

Steward 

Bloomington 

Avon 

Towanda 

Bloomington 

Normal 



80 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Flinn, Sarah Louvilla Christian, 

Foley, Minerva Vian LaSalle, 

Foster, Bernice Louise *McLean, 

Foster, Kathleen Lorena McLean, 

Fowler, Lillie Eugenie Iroquois, 

Frank, Pearl McLean, 

Fuhrman, Effie Hamilton, 
Gatons, Alice Elizabeth Will, 

Gerber, Minnie V. * McLean, 

Goodwin, Alice Pike, 

Gregory, Catherine Ellen Peoria, 

Griffin, Grace Loretta McLean, 

Griffith, Minnie {Montana,) 

Grisso, Iva Shelby, 

Guthrie, Luella Montgomery, 

Hamel, Adeline Cecelia LaSalle, 

Hamilton, Ina Estelle McLean, 

Harper, Flora Gertrude Woodford, 

Henaughan, Mary Ellen Bicliland, 

Henderson, Edith Ursula Henderson 

Hess, Maggie Pearl Pike, 

Higgins, Dorothy Mary Iroquois, 

Hitchcock, Elizabeth *McLean, 

Hitchcock, Mary Ella * McLean t 

Holderman, Martha Harriet Grundy, 

Howell, Minnie Schuyler, 

Hoyt, Nellie Mary Piatt, 

Humphrey, Anabel * McLean, 

Hunt, Fannie Fern Emily Jo Daviess, 

Hurlbut, Nina May Winnebago, 

Imboden, Sarah Mark Macon, 

Johnston, Bertha Helen Macon, 

Johnston, Gertrude Maude (Arkansas,) 

Judson, Ora May McHenry, 

Keller, Hannah Woodford, 

King, Anna Bichland, 

Kirkpatrick, Gertrude Anne * Mr Lean, 

Knott, Elizabeth Ann * McLean, 

Krafft, Ella Elsie St. Clair, 

Krausse, Minnie LaSalle, 

Kreis, Ida *McLean, 

Lantz, Anna Maud *McLean, 

Leaton, Grace * Mr Lean, 



POSTOFFICE 

Pana 
LaSalle 
Normal 
Normal 

Ash /. a m 

Gridley 

McLeansboro 

Joliet 

Stanford 

Pleasant Hill 

Trivoli 

Bloomington 

Helena 

Tower Hill 

Baymond 

LaSalle 

Bloomington 

Minonk 

Olney 

Biggsville 

* Pearl 

Loda 

Normal 

Normal 

Morris 

Bushrille 

Im Place 

Towanda 

Hanover 

Durand 

Decatur 

Latham 

Fort Smith 

Crystal Lake 

Panola 

Olney 

Normal 

Normal 

Belleville 

Troy ({rare 
Bloomington 
Bloomington 
Bloomington 



Illinois State Normal University. 



81 



NAMES. 

Lee, Minnie Frances 
Leigh, Helen 
Lentz, Mary 
Love, Mary Jean 
Lyons, Nora May 
McCord, Grace Amanda 
McCormick, Evelyn Agnes 
McCrea, Edith Burlingame 
McCrea, Ida Harkness 
McKee, Maggie 
McWherter, Mary Edith 
Manchester, Annie Luella 
Markel, Lona Gertrude 
Maxon, Mildred lone 
Mercer, Leslie Annetta 
Merriam, Nellie Emily 
Miller, Laura May 
Mills, Bertha Evelyn 
Mills, May 
Mitchell, Martha 
Moore, Mary E. 
Moore, Mary Olive 
Nimmo, Lizzie Maud 
Nollen, Nell Alma 
O'Doud, Annie Teressa 
Ogle, Faye Lela 
Olson, Alma 
Olson, Lucy Christene 
Parker, Leona Sara 
Parkinson, Mae E. 
Patton, Sadie 
Pearson, Ida May 
Peck, Olive Estelle 
Peeler, Lizzie E. 
Perry, Maude Edna 
Poisot, Nettie Prudence 
Porter, Eva Amanda 
Pricer, Nannie 
Putney, Lucy Boomer 
Railsback, Mrs. Lillie May 
Rogers, Lydia Virginia 
Rose Berneice Evangeline 
Ross, Silva 



COUNTY. 


POSTOPFICE 


Iroquois. 


La Hogue 


Marshall, 


. La Prairie Center 


Stephenson, 


Freeport 


Ogle, 


Elida 


Douglas, 


Newman 


Putnam, 


Granville 


DeKalb, 


Shabbona 


Ogle, 


Creston 


Ogle, 


Crest on 


Christian, 


Assumption 


Bond, 


Sorrento 


Sangamon, 


Pleasant Plains 


DeKalb, 


Genoa 


Christian , 


Bosamond 


Marion, 


Kin m imil ;/ 


Logan, 


Atlanta 


Cumberland, 


Toledo 


Putnam, 


Clear < 'reek 


Piatt, 


Linfiu r 


Will, 


Gooding's Cro re 


Macon, 


Decatur 


Pike, 


Pleasant Hill 


Livingston, 


Fairbury 


Logan, 


Atlanta 


Lake, 


Wadsworth 


Mercer, 


Keiihsburg 


Piatt, 


Weldon 


LaSalle, 


Peru 


St. Clair, 


OFallon 


Marshall, 


Wenona 


McLean, 


Lytleville 


Livingston, 


Cayuga 


Whiteside, 


Sterling 


McLean, 


Normal 


lAvingston, 


Cornell 


Fulton, 


Avon 


LaSalle, 


Streator 


Vermilion, 


Potomac 


LaSalle, 


Seneca 


McLean, 


Normal 


(Indiana,) 


Logan sport 


Whiteside, 


Prophetstown 


Macon, 


Argenta 



82 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. 

Ryrie, Rachel Alice 
Scanlan, Lena Gertrude 
Scanlan, Mary Helen 
Schofield, Marietta 
Scott, Sarah Rachel 
Shannon, Nellie Myrtle 
Shepard, Anna Laura 
Sitherwood, Grace 
Skillin, Florence Bessie 
Smith, Cora Dean 
Smith, Katherine 
Smith, Leilah Augusta 
Smith, Margaret Elizabeth 
Smull, Lizzie Eleanor 
Stapleton, Flora Alberta 
Sterett, Ida Eulalia 
Stubblefield, Edith Eliza 
Swanson, Emma Carolina 
Thompson, Katie Alice 
Thompson, Mary Elizabeth 
Tiley, Pearl May 
Tomlinson, Lottie Dorcas 
Trainer, Amanda Bernice 
Trimble, Clara Eugenia 
Trimmer, Lura Myrtle 
Turnbull, Hattie Agnes 
Veach, Luella 
Waddill, Mary Cline 
Waldron, Mabel 
Ward, Isabelle 
Warrick, Emma Sabina 
Wasson, Esther Cornelia 
Watson, Alice Perle 
Wetzel, Clara Artamacca 
Whigam, Jean Gertrude 
Wilmer, Anna Elizabeth 
Wilson. Alma Elizabeth 
Wilson, Estella May 
Worley, Arabella 
Worley, Blanche 
Wright, Edna May 
Wright, [da May 
Wrigley, Nelle Edith 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE 


Madison, 


Alton 


*McLean, 


Bloomington 


LaSalle, 


Peru 


McLean, 


Normal 


Ogle, 


Elida 


Whiteside, 


Sterling 


Carroll, 


Savanna 


*McLean, 


Bloomington 


Cook, 


Oak Park 


Moultrie, 


Lake City 


Vermilion, 


Danville 


Macon, 


Maroa 


Tazewell, 


3forton 


Macon, 


Macon 


Christian, 


Assumption 


Warren, 


Monmouth 


^McLean, 


Normal 


BeKaTb, 


Shabbona 


Jo Daviess, 


Apple Biver 


Sangamon, 


Springfield 


St. Clair, 


Belleville 


McLean, 


Chenoa 


Macon, 


Decatur 


Tazewell, 


Tremont 


Whiteside, 


Tampico 


Bureau, 


Princeton 


Hancock, 


Bentley 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


1 azewell, 


Delavan 


Will, 


Wilmington 


LaSalle, 


LaSalle 


Peoria, 


Elmwood 


Pike, 


Criggsville 


Christian, 


Stonington 


Lake, 


Aptakisic 


Shelby, 


Oconee 


Hock Island, 


Rural 


Woodford, 


Secor 


Marshall, 


Henry 


Woodford, 


FA I' 'a so 


Iroi/uois, 


Watseka 


Marsh all. 


Wcnona 


Shirk. 


Wyoming 



Illinois State Normal University. 



83 



NAMES. 

Yocom, Helen Margaret 
Zahn, Julia E. 
Zentmire, Clara 

Ackert, Earl Wilder 
Allen, Walter Harry 
Altmiller, Edward Samuel 
Askins, Abram Walter 
Baker, George Lee 
Boggess, Arthur 
Borsch, Charles Joseph 
Bowman, Charles Thomas 
Brown, Benjamin Fletcher 
Bruce, Benjamin 
Burt, Clarence Edward 
Cavitt, Frank Otis 
Chapman, Edward Phineas 
Clark, Samuel C. 
Cowan, Henry John 
Cowles, Robert Andrew 
Cox, Merton Dart 
Craig, Joseph Lingle 
Craigmile, Alexander Homer 
Dawson, Russel 
Dennis, Herbert Railsback 
DeVilliers, Henry Livingston 
Dickerson, Oliver Morton 
Dunlevy, Daniel Wilson 
Eastwood, Byron Evans 
Elliott, Charles Herbert 
Eskew, Ira 

Evelsizer, Charles Henry 
Fairchild, James Albert Leroy 
Flentje, Lewis Edwin 
Frink, Harry Richard 
Grosscup, Lawrence Wilson 
Gunnell, Orville James 
Gushee, Thomas Maxey, 
Hess, Ardie Durward 
Himes, Robert Pollock 
Jamison, Edwin Campbell 
Johnston, Milford L. 
Kern, John Winfred 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE 


Sangamon, 


Barclay 


Lake, 


Deerfield 


(Kansas), 


Cherokee 


Lee, 


Harmon 


*McLean, 


Bloomington 


Pike, 


Pittsfield 


Shelby, 


Lakewood 


Pope, 


Golconda 


Vermilion, 


Catlin 


Vermilion, 


Rankin 


Shelby, 


Lakewood 


*McLean, 


Normal 


Logan, 


Beason 


Marshall, 


Henry 


Iroquois, 


Watseka 


Shelby, 


Shelbyville 


(Iowa,) 


Bedford 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


*McLean, 


Bloomington 


Fayette, 


Vandalia 


Macon, 


Maroa 


Champaign, 


Gifford 


Woodford, 


ElPaso 


Tazewell, 


Minier 


(Missouri,) 


Moundville 


Jasper, 


West Liberty 


Woodford, 


ElPaso 


Lee, 


Franklin Grove 


St. Clair, 


Belleville 


Mc Henry, 


Woodstock 


Tazewell, 


Deer Creek 


Edgar, 


Warrentown 


Macoupin, 


Palmyra 


*McLean, 


Normal 


Marshall, 


Wenona 


*McLean, 


Normal 


Mercer, 


Keithsburg 


Pike, 


Pearl 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Warren, 


Ellison, 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Moultrie, 


Gays 



84 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. 

King-, Charles Roy 
Kofoid, Reuben Nelson 
Liggitt, Flemming 
Long, Fleming Thomas 
McCormick, Henry Goodrich 
McDonald, Dalton 
McMurry, Karl Franklin 
Madden, George Bowman 
Martin, Harry Lee 
Maxey, Frank Lee 
Melvin, Henry Hiram 
Miller, Harry Eugene 
Miner, Thomas Daniel 
Morgan, John William 
Morgan, Ora Sherman 
Morrell, John Finley 
Newell, Jesse Whittier 
Parker, Benjamin Franklin 
Peasley, William K. 
Perry, Wilson James 
Price, Hollis Hubert 
Puffer, Wilfred Edward 
Ryder, Nelson Landon 
Shelby, Alvin Henry 
Stevenson, Ralph Ewing 
Stewart, John Pogue 
Stewart, William C. 
Stoutenburg, Lewis Eugene 
Titterington, Clarence N. 
Urban, Harvey Benjamin 
Waits, Harmon Bert 
Wells, David Hopkins 
Williams, Jeremiah Fernando 
Wilson, John Thomas 
Wolfe, Albert Benedict 
Worrell, Joseph Carl 
Young, Noah A. 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE 


Macon, 


Fhvin 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Livingston, 


Nevada 


Henry, 


Lynn Center 


McLean, 


Normal 


Vermilion , 


Potomac 


McLean, 


Normal 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Marion, 


Vernon 


McLean, 


Saybrook 


Piatt, 


Cisco 


Warren, 


Monmouth 


Shelby, 


Quigley 


Sangamon, 


Dawson 


Kane, 


Hampshire 


Pike, 


Peri-y 


Montgomery, 


Farmersville 


St. Clair, 


O'Fallon 


*McLean, 


Bloomington 


Ford, 


Melvin 


Shelby, 


Shelby ville 


Livingston, 


Odell 


Madison, 


Marine 


JJeWitt, 


Wapella 


* McLean , 


Bloomington 


Henderson, 


Biggsville 


*McLean, 


Bloomington 


*McLean, 


Normal 


Bock Island, 


Edgington 


McLean, 


Gibson City 


Perry, 


Tamaroa 


Macon, 


Elwin 


Fayette, 


Loogootee 


Piatt, 


Be Land 


Bureau, 


Arlington 


Hancock, 


Chili 


Vermilion, 


Bismark 



Students who have Completed Less than One Year's Work. 

Aaron. Edna Virginia Adams, Big Neck 

A.bbott, Lillian Wealthy Bureau, LaMoille 

Adams, Harriet Elizabeth Hancock, Bowen 



Illinois State Normal University. 



85 



NAMES. 

Allen, Harriet Frances 
Anderson, Grace Rae 
Andrew, Metta 
Augustine, Ora May 
Baird, Mildred Eliza 
Barger, Helen Merenda 
Bartlett, Mary Adell 
Bear, Etta Myrtle 
Beckwith, Mrs. Ida Sarah 
Bedinger, Letitia 
Bedinger, Nellie 
Beedle, Susie Evelyn 
Black, Luella 
Blanchard, Leona 
Bricker, Pearl Eddeth 
Browning, Effie 
Buchanan, Bessie Belle 
Bullock, Edna Virginia 
Burlingame, Ida May 
Burton, Emma 
Buxton, Edith Jane 
Cain, Ella Belle 
Cain, Harriet Maud 
Cairns, Lillias 
Calhoun, Erma 
Campbell, Ida McElroy 
Cannady, Arah Alice 
Cass, Mattie 
Clark, Coral May 
Clodfelter, Elsie Mae 
Conger, Hattie Edna 
Conley, Kate 
Conover, Mrs. Clara 
Constant, Adella Juanita 
Cook, Abbie Janette 
Cook, Lorena 
Cronin, Anna 
Cutler, Emily Mae 
Davidson, Anna Mary 
Deeds, Lulu May 
Dennis, Maud Susan 



COUNTY. 

LaSalle, 

Vermilion, 

Piatt, 

McLean, 
* McLean, 
* McLean, 

DeKalb, 

Macon, 

Peoria, 
^McLean, 
*McLean, 

Kane, 

Tazewell, 

Pope, 

McLean, 

Peoria, 

Peoria, 
f Woodford, 

Tazewell, 

Vermilion , 

Mason, 

Be Witt, 

BeWitt, 

Marion, 
*(Ohio,) 

Warren, 

St. Clair, 
*McLean, 

Mercer, 
* McLean, 

Ford, 

Mercer, 

Crawford, 
*McLean, 

Rock Island, 

Fulton, 

Christian, 

Rock Island, 

LaSalle, 

Jo Daviess, 

Tazewell, 



POSTOPFICE 

Marseilles 

Armstrong 

Monticello 

Normal 

Bloomington 

Normal 

Rollo 

Bearsdale 

Peoria 

Normal 

Normal 

Aurora 

Green Valley 

Hartsville 

Bloomington 

Peoria 

Peoria 

Eureka 

Belavan 

Pilot 

San Jose 

Be Witt 

Be Witt 

Centralia 

Warsaw 

Monmouth 

East St. Louis 

Bloomington 

Creamery 

Shirley 

Gibson City 

Aledo 

Landes 

Bloomington 

Rural 

Fairview 

Assumption 

Edgington 

Seneca 

Pleasant Valley 

Minier 



tDied December 30, 1895. 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. 

Dennis. Myrtle 

Dewey, Kate Louise 

Downs, Lavina 

Drew, Effa May 

Dunlap, Bettie 

Dysert, Estella 

Easton, Alberta Davis 

Enslow, Claudia 

Ervin, Laura Edna 

Eversol, Mary Eliza 

Ewbank, Eva Leora 

Fear, Ivah Gertrude 

Feeney, Elizabeth 

Finney, May Belle 

Fleming", Lala Belle 

Fleming - , Lula Belle 

Ford, Jennie 

Fruin, Elizabeth Antoinette 

Fry, Dollie Virdie 

Gardner, Edith 

Gardner, Hattie M. 

Gibson, Anna Lucile 

Gmehlin, Amelia Helen 

Goodwin, Mary Elizabeth 

Gray, Penelope 

Gray, Sarah 

Greer, Sarah 

Gregory, Lydia Mary 

Gvillo, May 

Hagaman, Honore 

Hall, Iva 

Hallock, Minnie Julina 

Harpole, Emma 

Hawkes, Mrs. Adeline Gertrude 

Haynie, May 

Heisey, Kansas Mae 

Henaughan, Nora 

Henderson, Sallie Belle 

Hendrick, Amy Leona 

Hendricks, Sybil Mary 

Henninger, Georgia Baird 

Ness, Ada Belle 

J less, Blanche Ruth 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE 


Tazewell, 


Mi nil r 


Stark, 


Toulon 


*McLean, 


Downs 


Shelby, 


Moawequa 


*MeLean, 


Hudson 


Vermilion, 


Pilo 1 


Piatt, 


Atwood 


Macoupin, 


Girard 


Mercer, 


Biggsville 


Clark, 


Weaver 


DeWitt, 


Farmer City 


Christian, 


Assumption 


Champaign, 


Ivesdale 


Peoria, 


Peoria 


Iroquois, 


Watseka 


Iroquois, 


Watseka 


DeWitt, 


Maroa 


*McLean, 


Bloomington 


Shelby, 


Prairie Home 


Logan, 


Beason 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Randolph, 


Sparta 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Macoupin, 


Bunker Hill 


Christian, 


TaylorviUc 


Christian, 


Blue Mound 


Cook, 


Evanston 


Peoria, 


Trivoli 


Madison, 


Fosterburg 


Ford, 


Elliot 


Shelby, 


Cowden 


Stark, 


Osceola 


White, 


Carmi 


Henry, 


Kewanee 


Marion, 


Salem 


Marion, 


Iuka 


Richland, 


Olney 


SJielby, 


Assumption 


Carroll, 


Milledgerille 


Me Henry, 


Spring Grove 


Fayette, 


Hagerstown 


Pike, 


Milton 


Pike f 


Milton 



.t/WIWJlO ^1/U-l/O XT l// IIVUjIi U/IK/OIOM^, 



NAMES. COUNTY. POSTOFFICE 

Hester, June McLean, Saybrook 

Higgins, Corinne Janette Iroquois, Loda 

Higgs, Meta deL. Peoria, Cramers 

Hill, Helen Stephenson, Freeport 

Hobart, Maud Finley *Iroquois, Gilman 

Holmes, Augusta Florence Crawford, Eaton 

Holmes, Easter May Wayne, Mt. Erie 

Horn an, Lucy Fanchion Peoria, Cramers 

Houchin, Laura Taylor McLean, Normal 

Hummel, Ida Rose Ford. Roberts 

Hummel, Sarah Matilda Ford, Boberts 

Hunt, Elizabeth La Veille Peoria, Peoria 

Hurst, Mary Agnes Knox, Galesburg 

Hutchins, Minnie May Edwards, Albion 

Hyde, Mary Isabelle Marshall, Wenona 

Ingels, Lou Carrie Cook, Chicago 

Jack, Edith Eliene Fulton, Farmington 

Jackson, Ellen Hancock, Hamilton 

Jackson, Maggie Douglas, Camargo 

Jacobs, Minnie Mason, San Jose 

Jeffris, Margaret E. Moultrie, Sullivan 

Joerg, Rose Elizabeth St. Clair, Belleville 

Johnson, Amanda Bureau, Buda 

Johnson, Gertrude Ellen Christian, Assumption 

Johnson, May Ruth Monroe, Columbia 

Jones, Edith May McHenry, Crystal Lake 

Jordan, Olive Evalina Champaign, Ludlow 

Judy, Laura May Vermilion, Blue Grass 

Kell, Charlotte Marion, Salem 

Kent, Bessie Grace *McLean, Gridley 

Kerr, Fanny Vermilion, Rossville 

Ketzle, Mary Augusta Mercer, Reynolds 

Kingsbury, Mabel Randolph, Chester 

Kintz, Daisy Maude *McLean, Bloomington 

Kirk, Sarah Frances Montgomery, Farmersville 

Koehler, Emma Otillie ^McLean, Normal 

Kuck, Esther Katherine Logan, Latham 

Kugelmann, Elsie St. Clair, Mascoutah 

Lane, Gilberttena Ogle, Rochelle 

Lantz, Ida Rebecca Woodford, Congerville 

Laubenheim, Livonia Lena Jefferson, Belle River 

Laughlin, Sara Abbie (Iowa,) College Springs 

Lebeque, Ernestine Mav Madison, Highland 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. 

Lindsey, Carrie Ellen 
Lindsey, Lucy Lenora 
Lloyd, Cora 
Lowe, Annie Pet 
Lyons, Alice 
McClellan, Alice May 
McCord, Mary Louise 
McGregor, Elizabeth 
McKinney, Bernice 
McKinney, Margaret Mildred 
McKnight, Ida Lucinda 
McRae, Alice Mae 
McTaggart, Rose 
McTaggart, Teresa 
McTier, Asenith June 
Mallon, Marry 
Mann, Martha Elnora 
March, Mary Louise 
Martin, Pearl Buckman 
Matt, Adah Gertrude 
Maue, Amelia Sarah 
Maurer, Pauline Marie 
Mayo, Gertrude 
Mead, Nellie Cora 
Mell, Jenny Alice 
Mercer, Daisy 
Merker, Susie 
Mills, Edna Gertrude 
Mills, Flora Lavinia 
Minard, Maude Marie 
Moore, Lizzie Elva 
Morgan, Hattie Robertha 
Morrison, Lucy Arnette 
Murray, Florence Emily 
X<'itT/,iger, Emma Henrietta 
Neu, Elizabeth Augusta 
Newell, Agnes, 
Newlove, Alice Victoria 
Nicholson, Margaret Jane 
Olson, Anna 
Patterson, Maud Klma 
Peckliani, Myra 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE 


Tazevx //, 


Lilly 


Tazewell, 


Lilly 


Champaign, 


Urbana 


Macon, 


Maroa 


Bureau, 


Arlington. 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Fayette, 


Vandalia 


Ogle, 


Byron 


Christian, 


Assumption 


Christian, 


Assumption 


Warren, 


Monmouth. 


Carroll, 


Savanna 


Coles, 


A irol.a 


Coles, 


Areola 


Knox, 


Maquon 


Douglas, 


Tuscola 


Eclgar, 


Paris 


Shelby, 


Oconee 


Cook, 


Harvey 


Cook, 


Evanston 


Will, 


Mokena 


Sangamon, 


Cross Plains 


Eclgar, 


Isabel 


Hancock, 


Augusta 


Mason, 


San Jose 


Marion, 


Kinmundy 


Macon, 


Emery 


Putnam, 


Clear Creek 


Putnam, 


Clear Creek 


Livingston, 


Long Point 


St. Clair, 


O'Fallon 


Shelby, 


Oconee 


Warren, 


Baritan 


Will, 


Plainfield 


Lawrence, 


Sumner 


Christian, 


Pana 


Montgomery, 


Farmersvillc 


Be Witt, 


Clinton 


Winnebago, 


Winnebago 


Piatt, 


Weldon 


-Pike, 


Pearl 


Kendall, 


Bristol 



Illinois State Normal University. 



89 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Peters, Delia May Champaign, 

Porter, Eliza Wolfe * McLean, 

Porter, Nellie *McLean, 

Price, Clara Mabel *McLean, 

Prior, Murray DeWitt, 

Pryce, Fanny Bock Island, 

Pryce, Ida Bock Island, 

Rambo, Jessie Eulalia Knox, 

Reding, Maude Menard, 

Rehorst, Nellie Lana McHenry, 

Regenold, Mabel Zoe Putnam, 

Renshaw, Jennie Fulton, 

Reynolds, Anna Bertilla Ogle, 

Reynolds, Ethel Faye Logan, 

Rice, Lena Henrietta *McLean, 

Richhart, Nellie Elizabeth Shelby, 

Rieger, Rose Minnie Cook, 

Ropp, Theresa Cook, 

Saline, Effie Cecilia LaSalle, 

Schempp, Bertha LaSalle, 

Schertz, Ellen Josephine Tazewell, 

Schiek, Philippena St. Clair, 
Schipper, Theda Martina Charlotte Tazewell, 

Schoonmaker, Flora Belle DeKalb, 

Scogin, Martha Emma Be Witt, 

Scott, Elsie May Bureau, 

Scott, Lulu Nancy Bureau, 

Scott, Ruth Rader St. Clair, . 

Scrivner, Sarah Frances *(Ohio,) 

Seeley, Helen Edna Schuyler, 

Shepherd, Nina Pearl Hancock, 

Simmons, Jessie Josephine Hancock, 

Simpson, Elizabeth Morgan, 

Sisson, Ada Belle DeKalb, 

Smith, Daisy May Tazewell, 

Smith, Mina May Tazewell, 

Spargrove, Lura Lucile Marshall, 

Speer, Lurene Caroline Vermilion, 

Stanley, Minnie Henderson, 

St. Clair, Georgiana McHenry, 

Stewart, Mary Ida Mercer, 

Stewart, Susan Margaret Vermilion, 

Stites, Lena Katherine * McLean, 

—7 



POSTOFFICE 

Bondville 

Bloomington 

Bloomington 

Bloomington 

Clinton 

Coal Valley 

Coed Valley 

Maquon 

Tallula 

Bichmond 

Florid 

Table Grove 

Bochelle 

Atlanta 

Bloomington 

Moawequa 

Chicago 

Irving Park 

Mendola 

Troy Grove 

Deer Creek 

Freeburg 

Pikiii 

Wallace 

Wapella 

Maiden 

Maiden 

O'Fallon 

Madison 

Littleton 

Bowen 

Joetta 

Murrayville 

Genoa 

Deer Creek 

Dillon 

Wenona 

Bankin 

Stronghurst 

Nunda 

Norwood 

Potomac 

Bloomington 



90 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. 

Swearing-en, Edna Pearle 
Talbott, Minnie Alta 
Taylor, Nellie 
Taylor, Virginia 
Thomas, Pattie Marie 
Thompson, Iva Irene 
Thurston, Ettie May 
Tindall, Anna May 
Tindall, Elizabeth Margaret 
Tobey, Clara 
Tolson, Susie May 
Treg-ellas, Florence May 
Troxel, Mabel Edith 
Tucker, Jessie Maude 
Vail, Fannie Jane 
VanBuskirk, Mary Elizabeth 
VanDervoort, Maude E 
VanHorn, Margaret 
Vollrath, Alma Elizabeth 
Wadsworth, Sadie Luida 
Walker, Maude Mary 
Wall, Susan 

Wallace, Caroline Louise 
Walling, Mrs. Annie Senteney 
Walters, Florence Elizabeth 
Ward, Marian Felicite 
Webster, Nellie Grace 
Wells, Pearl Amanda 
Wheeler, Cora Blanche 
Wheeler, Mae 
White, Daisy Paota 
White, Dora May 
White, Maria Elizabeth 
Whittaker, Hettie Sebrah 
Williams, Elsie 
Wilson, Jennie Saria 
Wilson, May Annetta 
Wilson, Nora Zelle 
Winn, Ruth Georgiana 
Woltman, Helena Olga 
Womacks, Nita 
Wood, Almira 
Wood. Kit a 



COGNTY. 


POSTOFFICE 


Champaign, 


St. Joseph 


Vermilion, 


Blue Grass 


La Salle, 


La Salle 


Cook, 


Chicago 


McLean, 


Normal 


Effingham, 


Shumway 


Whiteside, 


Prophetstown 


Rod' Island, 


Milan 


Rock Island, 


Milan 


Kankakee, 


Hersher 


Shelby, 


Moawequa 


Fulton , 


Astoria 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Edgar, 


Chrisman 


Henry, 


Geneseo 


Cook, 


Chicago 


* McLean, 


Heyworth 


Tazewell, 


Pekin 


Madison, 


Marie 


Bock Island, 


Milan 


Hancock, 


Middle Creek 


Lake, 


Waukegan 


Madison, 


Alton 


Douglas, 


Areola 


Bureau, 


Princeton 


St. Clair, 


Belleville 


Iroquois. 


Woodland 


McLean, 


Normal 


Pike, 


Milton 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Ogle, 


Stillman Valley 


Champaign, 


Gifford 


Warren, 


Moserille 


Bureau, 


Tiskilwa 


Douglas, 


Tuscola 


* Rock Island, 


Ttural 


Shell);/, 


Shelby ville 


Livingston , 


Chatsworth 


L<t Salle, 


Waltham 


( Missouri., ) 


Neeper 


Champaign, 


( ■hampaign 


Edgar, 


Paris 


Lit gar, 


Paris 



Illinois State Normal University. 



!U 



NAMES. 

Wormley, Blanche 
Wyckoff, Irene Bessie 
Wykoff, Fanny Iola 
Yancy, Ida Lillian 

Adamson, George Thomas 
Allison, Frank Fisher 
Ashvvorth, Ralph William 
Axley, Flavius 
Bassler, Herman 
Benedict, William Alfred 
Billman, Harvey Samuel 
Blair, Wylie William 
Brady, Hugh Henry 
Carter, William Joseph 
Cassaday, William H. 
Cavins, Stanley Thomas 
Clark, Roy D. 
Conard, James Stiles 
Conger, Gary Roy 
Conrath, William 
Corrington, Alfred 
Crosby, Clifford 
Crow, Gliver Lee 
Diehl, George Edmund 
Dutcher, Stephen Albert 
Edgar, John Adams 
Ely, John Maurice 
Everitt, John Huston 
Fitzsimmons, Peter Henry 
Funk, Roy Davis 
Gibson, James Walter 
Gross, Charles E. 
Hall, Charles El wood 
Hamilton, Orville 
Hawkes, William 
Hendricks, Frank J. 
Hess, Absalom 
Hester, Arthur M. 
Hodges, John Dalmar 
Holmes, James William 
Hummel, Adam Albert 
Jackson, John W. 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE 


Be Kalb, 


Shabbona 


Macon, 


Harristown 


Macon, 


Maroa 


Pike, 


Barry 


Shelby, 


Moawequa 


^Carroll, 


Milledgeville 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


Monroe, 


Merrimac Point 


Macon, 


Forsyth 


Kankakee, 


Waldron 


Henry, 


Kewanee 


Marion, 


Salem 


Cook, 


Chicago 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


Coles, 


Campbell 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


McLean 


Lexington 


Piatt, 


Monticello 


Ford, 


Gibson City 


St. Clair, 


Freeburg 


Christian, 


Assumption 


Henry, 


Annawan 


Macon, 


Blue Mound 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


Pike, 


New Canton 


Mercer, 


Joy 


Grundy, 


Mazon 


Mason, 


Teheran 


Sangamon, 


Curran 


Morgan, 


Alexander 


Jefferson, 


3ft. Vernon 


Piatt, 


Cerro Gordo 


Douglas, 


Camargo 


Warren, 


Boseville 


Henry, 


Kewanee 


Mc Henry, 


Spring Grove 


Pike, 


Pearl 


'^McLean, 


Saybrook 


Marion, 


Sedan 


Sangamon, 


Springfield 


Ford, 


Bobert 


Sangamon, 


Buffalo Hart 



92 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. COUNTY. POSTOFFICE 

Jones, Bertrand Thompson Sangamon, Barclay 

Judy, Elmer Grant Vermilion, Potomac 

Keiner, Frederick William Clinton, New Memphis 

Kniple, Egbert Delmer (Virginia,) Augusta 

Kueter, Herman . Clinton, Damiansville 

Lampe, Henry Edward Clinton, Bartelso 

Lane, Alva Clifford Shelby, Robinson Creek 

Lebeque, Julius Madison, Highland 

Linn, Joseph Henry St. Clair, Mascoutah 

Linnabary, John Bruce Coles, Charleston 

Livingston, Samuel William Madison, Poag 

Livingston, Theodore Brooks Livingston, Ocoya 

Luke, Edward Vermilion, Danville 

McCullough, Frank Tazewell, Bradley 

McShane, John James Hugh Champaign, Ivesdale 

Maurer, John *McLean, Stanford 

Mills, Leroy Addison Putnam, Mt. Palatine 

Morrison, John * McLean, Bloomington 

Myers, Charles Oscar Tazewell, Bradley 

Newell, Moses Elmer Montgomery, Farmersville 

Newlin, Bernard Walter Crawford, Robinson 

Newlin, Edgar Oriel Crawford, Robinson 

Packard, H. Roy * McLean, Bloomington 

Parnall, Edward McDonough, Colcliester 

Pfeifer, John Matthew Sangamon, New Berlin 

Reinhardt, Benjamin Franklin St. Clair, Mascoutah 

Robison, Oliver Newton Moultrie, Windsor 

Schutt, Walter Robert St. Clair, Belleville 

Sheffler, William Whitmer Shelby, Prairie Home 

Siron, Oscar S. *McLean, Lexington 

Skiles, William Vernon LaSalle, Troy Grove 

Skinner, Guy Warren *McLean, Hudson 

Sparks, Claude G. Tazewell, Mackinaiv 

Spofford, James Robert Jo Daviess, Warren 

Steinmiller, Henry Schuyler, Rushville 

Stevenson, Otis Kagy Marion, Salem 

Strevy, Joseph E. Christian, Morriso7iville 

Sutton, Russell J. Mason, Mason City 

Swofford, George Lewis Lynn Champaign, St. Joseph 

Taylo, Myron Dewitt *McLean, Saybrook 

Taylor, Samuel Martin -McLean, Bloomington 

Troxel, Cecil Warren *McLean, Normal 

rjrban, ( lharles ( lalvin * McLean, Gibson City 



Illinois State Normal School. 



NAMES. 
VanDervoort, William 
Walter, Henry 
Walters, Arthur E. 
Ward, Bishop 

Weddle, Rutherford Bradford 
Wilhoit, Ruf us Arlie 
Wilson, Arthur McCandless 
Wilson, Harry Scott 
Woltmann, Frederick 
Wynd, Robert Smith 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE 


McLean, 


Ellsworth 


Pope, 


Golconda 


Whiteside, 


Coleta 


DeWitt, 


Clinton 


Piatt, 


Cisco 


Clark, 


Martinsville 


Bock Island, 


Rural 


Rock Island, 


Rural 


(Missouri), 


Neeper 


Tazewell, 


Hopedale 



Summary. 



Special students, 
Seniors, 

Second class, - 
Third class, 
Fourth class, - 



7 

59 
100 
270 
353 



Total, 



789 



94 



Annual Catalogue 



Table 

SHOWING ATTENDANCE BY COUNTIES OF STUDENTS RECEIVING FREE 

TUITION. 



Adams 4 Jasper 1 

Bond 1 Jefferson 3 

Bureau 10 Jersey 1 

Carroll 7 Jo Daviess 5 

Champaign 13 Kane 2 

Christian 19 Kankakee 4 

Clark 2 Kendall 3 

Clinton 4 Knox 4 

Coles 13 Lake 6 

Cook 12 LaSalle 20 

Crawford 5 Lawrence 1 

Cumberland 1 Lee 3 

DeKalb 12 Livingston .... ... 12 

DeWitt 13 Logan 7 



Douglas 7 

DuPage 1 

Edgar 7 

Edwards 1 



McDonough 2 

McHenry 9 

McLean 49 

Macon 22 

Effingham 1 Macoupin (5 

Fayette 4 Madison 15 

Ford 8 Marion 13 

Fulton 11 Marshall 8 



Gallatin 



2 Mason 6 



Grundy 4 Menard 1 



.... 2 Mercer 9 

10 Monroe 3 

5 Montgomery 5 

.... 9 Morgan 2 

Iroquois 12 Moultrie 5 

Total number of counties represented, 85. 



Hamilton. 
Hancock . . 
Henderson 
Henry .... 



Ogle 9 

Peoria 12 

Perry 3 

Piatt 12 

Pike 10 

Pope 6 

Putnam . .10 

Randolph 2 

Richland 3 

Rock Island 16 

St. Clair 22 

Sangamon 13 

Schuyler 3 

Scott 1 

Shelby 27 

Stark 4 

Stephenson 3 

Tazewell 26 

Vermilion 24 

Warren 10 

Washington 1 

Wayne 1 

White 1 

Whiteside 7 

Will 7 

Winnebago 3 

Woodford 13 

Other States .14 

Total 789 



Ninety-three additional McLean county students paid tuition at 
the rate of $39.00 per year. 



Illinois State Normal University. 



!>.-> 



Grammar Department. 



NAME. 

Adams, Annie 
Adams, Harriet 
Baldwin, Gertrude 
Barger, Helen 
Conger, Hattie 
Cook, Abbie 
Davis, Myrtle 
Dennis, Myrtle 
Eaton, May 
Evans, Mamie 
Feeney, Annie 
Finney, May 
Gibeaut, Stella 
Hayden, Mary 
Hafliger, Stella 
Herrington Cora 
Hester, June 
Keys, Etta 
Koehler, Emma 
Koehler, Houlda 
Lantz, Ida 
Leutwiler, Ida 
Lowe, Annie 
McGregor, Lizzie 
Mills, Gertrude 
Parker, Leona 
Porter, Lyda 
Price, Mabel 
Rehorst, Nellie 
Robertson, Purl 
Scogin. Martha 
Smith, Daisy 
Speer, Lou 
Stewart, Etta 



lRATORY CLASS. 




COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Hancock, 


Bowen 


Fulton, 


Ipava 


McLean, 


Normal 


Ford, 


Gibson City 


Mercer, 


Sherrard 


(Kansas), 


Stafford 


Tazewell, 


Minier 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Champaign, 


Iresdale 


1 azewell, 


Delavan 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Tazewell, 


Dillon 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Saybrook 


Logan, 


Season 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


Woodford, 


Conger ville 


Madison, 


Alfiambra 


Macon, 


Maroa 


Ogle, 


Byron 


Putnam, 


Clear Creek 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Normal 


Mc Henry, 


Bichmond 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Be Witt, 


Wapella 


Tazewell, 


Beer Crf-.ek 


McLean, 


Normal 


Mercer, 


Noncood 



<><; 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


POSTOFPICE 


Stites, Lena 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Thayer, Jennie 


Ford, 


Sibley 


Thompson, Iva 


Effingham, 


Effingham 


Tindall, Alma 


Rock Island, 


Milan 


Wadsworth, Saidee 


Rock Island, 


Milan 


Walker, Maude 


Hancock, 


Middle Creek 


Wall, Susie 


Lake, 


Waukegan 


Wells, Pearl 


McLean, 


Normal 


Wilson, Hattie 


BeWitt, 


Wapella 


Wilson, Saria 


Rock Island, 


Rural 


Woltmann, Helena 


(Missouri), 


Neeper 


Wyckoff, Irene 


Macon, 


Harristown 


Armstrong", William 


Coles, 


Campbell 


Campbell, Frank 


Warren, 


Monmouth 


Cassady, William 


Coles, 


Campbell 


Clark, Roy 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Condon, Thomas 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Diehl, George 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


Fehr, George 


Will, 


Joliet 


Fleming - , Frank 


Coles, 


Cook's Mills 


Franzen, Theodore 


Livingston, 


Odell 


Hall, C. E. 


Douglas, 


Camargo 


Hazle, Stephen 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Hess, Absalom 


Pike, 


Pearl 


Hines, William 


McLean, 


Shirley 


Houston, John 


(New York), 


Albany 


Lafferty, George 


Mercer, 


Norwood 


Linn, Joseph 


St. Clair, 


Mascoutah 


Matliison, George 


Will, 


Peotone 


Mehan, Fred 


St. Clair, 


Millstadt 


Nash, William 


Hancock, 


Bowen 


Newell, Elmer 


Montgomery, 


Farmersville 


Newell, Ralph 


Montgomery, 


Farmersville 


Palmer, ftdward 


Marshall, 


Toluca 


Siron, Oscar 


McLean, 


Lexington 


Stuckey, Leo 


McLean, 


Hudson 


Sutton, Russell 


Mason, 


Mason City 


Taylo, Myron 


McLean, 


Saybrook 


Weddle, .Jesse 


Piatt, 


Cisco 


Wharton, .John 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Wilson, Harry 


Hock Island, 


Rural 


Total, - 


. 


75 



Illinois State Normal University. 



m 



GRAMMAR GRADES. 



NAMES. 

Alspaugh, Mamie 
Baker, Maude 
Boyer, Blanche 
Broadhead, Lemma 
Champion, Marie 
Dekins, Myrtle 
Ferguson, Edith 
Gardner, Ruth 
Graves, Vega 
Gregory, Emma 
Guthrie, Leila 
Hiett, Ola 
Howell, Louie 
Little, Mollie 
Lloyd, Helen 
Mammen, Vera 
Mavity, Louise 
McKinney, Mildred 
Miller, Lula 
Poulton, Minnie 
Proctor, Norma 
Richards, Florence 
Roder, Mattie 
Shinkle, Alice 
Smith, Marian 
Smitson. Laura 
Snow, Cora 
Snow, Vera 
Stapleton, Bernice 
Weldon, Maggie 
Wilson, Maude 

Aldrich, John 
Augustus, Scott 
Baker, Clarence 
Bane, Ira 
Brown, Arlo 
Burt, Asher 
Buxton, Louis 
Capen, Bernard 
Carlock, Bruce 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE 


McLean, 


Normal 


Cook, 


Chicago 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


{Indiana), 


Paoli 


Christian, 


Assumption 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Normal 


Rock Island, 


Rura 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Shelby, 


Prairie Home 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


Mason, 


San Jose 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Normal 



NAMES. 

Crig-ler, Clute 
DeMange, Ralph 
Dick, Fred 
Dillon, Ray 
Eaton, Charles 
Evans, Mark 
Gantz, Irwin 
Graham, Harlowe 
Greenough, Charles 
Helmick, Russell 
Hetfield, Reed 
Hilyard, Horace 
Howell, Frank 
Johnson, Homer 
Johnson, Walter 
Johnstone, Lyle 
Kent, Royal 
Knott, Walter 
Lord, Guy 
Mammen, Harry 
McGregor, Andrew 
McWherter, George 
Means, Arthur 
Means, Joseph 
Miller, Hugh 
Mize, Wilbur 
Mohr, William 
Molesworth, Clyde 
Moon, Byron 
Morgan, Richard 
Neal, Ernest 
Patterson, Claude 
Reece, Grant 
Reeves, Houston 
Sage, Chester 
Sinclair, Uel 
Shinkle. Vincent 
Smith, Ward 
Stewart, Roy 
Stubblefield, David 
Taylor, Albert 
Wright, Charley 
Total, 



COUNTY. 

McLean, 
McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

Monroe, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean. 

Ogle, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

Cumberland, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 



POSTOFFICE 

Normal 

Bloomington 

Bloomington 

Normal 

Normal 

Bloomington 

Bloomington 

Bloomington 

Yuton 

Normal 

Normal 

Waterloo 

Bloomington 

Bloomington 

Normal 

Bloomington 

Normal 

Normal 

Normal 

Bloomington 

Byron 

Normal 

Bloomington 

Bloomington 

Normal 

Normal 

Yuton 

Normal 

Normal 

Bloomington 

Diona 

Normal 

Normal 

Bloomington 

Normal 

Normal 

Normal 

Bloomington 

Bloomington 

Normal 

Normal 

Normal 

ft 9 



Illinois State Normal University. 99 

Summary. 

Preparatory class, - - - - - 75 

Grammar grades, ----- 82 

Total, • 157 

Girls, 77 

Boys, - - - - - - - 80 

Total, 157 



100 



Annual Catalogue 



Intermediate Department. 



Alspaugh, Willa 
Augustine, Myrtle 
Baylor, Lelia 
Baylor. Pearl 
Beadle, Mabel 
Beadle, Maud 
Benbrook, Leah 
Bishop, Lulu 
Boyer, Ethel 
Bright, Fannie 
Brock, Mabel 
Brown, Elta 
Brown, Grace 
Clark, Chloe 
Clough, May 
Coen, Maggie 
Coen, Nellie 
Coith, Clara 
Coith, Edna 
Colvin, Maud 
Courtright, Ada 
Courtright, Clara 
Courtright, Ruth 
Crigler, Nina 
Crooks, Lucy Belle 



Dillon, Bessie 
Dillon, Ethel 
Felmley, Ruth 
Ferguson, Blanche 
Gerber, Chloe 
Gray, Lucy 
Gregory, Lois 
Guthrie, Bernardine 
Guthrie, Leila 
Haney, Ruth 
Hiett, Lela 
Hiett, Ola 
Howell, Louie 
Humphrey, Jessie 
Johnson, Caroline 
Johnston, Edna 
Kennedy, Merle 
King, Fern 
Knott. Grace 
Lord, Mamie 
Mace, Ruth 
McNeil, Grace 
Marks, Maud 
Mavity, Mary 
Miller, Alta 



Miller, Lulu 
Milliken, Ora 
Morse, Marguerite 
Myers, Irene 
Peasley, Irene 
Peasley, Lucille 
Perry, Barza 
Poulten, Winnie 
Proctor, Norma 
Railsback, Marie 
Rosenberry, Ethel 
Sharpless, Debbie 
Smith, Alice 
Smith, Helen 
Smith, Marian 
Smitson, Laura 
Stanger, Montana 
Taylor, Ocela 
Thompson, Ethel 
VanHook, Nellie 
Vencill, Lulu 
Wheeler, Jessie 
Wickizer, May 
Wilson, Mabel • 
Wilson, Maude 



Alexander, Archie 
Allen, Jay 
Anderson, Benjamin 
Beadle, Elbert 
Beadle, Homer 
Bedinger, Franklin 
Bell, Fred 
Bricker, Norman 
Bright, Reuben 
Coith, Al viu 
Courtright, Harry 



Craig, Fred 
Crigler, Clute 
Curtis, Felix 
Denton, Earl 
Dick, Carl 
Dick, Fred 
Dlilon, Chester 
Gardner, Harold 
Gregory, Herbert 
Griggs, Gresham 
Helmick, Russell 



Hetfield, Miller 
Hibler, Herbert 
Howard, Archie 
Hutchin, Elberon 
Jackson, Lester 
Jackson, Leigh 
Johnson, Ebert 
Johnson, Roy 
Johnson, William 
Kennedy, Allen 
K i rkpatrick, Charles 



Illinois State Noimal University. 



101 



Knott, Walter 
Kuhn, Louie 
Kuhn, Waldo 
Leighton, Norman 
Lindblad, Arthur 
Lindblad, Edwards 
Loehr, William 
Lord, Emory 
Lord, Guy 
Lutz, David 
McCord, Freeman 
McWherter, Paul 
Madden, Fred 
Marker, Fred 



Moon, Alonzo 
Morsman, Fred 
Morsman, James 
Patterson, Claude 
Pollitt, Bert 
Pollitt, Courtland 
Poulten, Charles 
Railsback, Fay 
Reeves, Huston 
Riley, Dean 
Schad, Stuart 
Schad, William 
Shinkle, Eddie 
Stansbury, Leslie 



Stolze, Carl 
Stubblefield, David 
Treakle, Jesse Fell 
VanHook, Herbert 
Van Pelt, Eugene 
Veach, James 
Vencill, Albert 
Walker, Paul 
Weinhart, Charles 
Weldon, James 
Wentz, Roy 
Witwer, Roy 
Wrigley, Harry 



Girls enrolled, 75; boys enrolled, 74. Total, 149. 



102 



Annual Catalogue 



Primary Department 1895=96. 



Bates, Laura 
Baylor, Irene 
Beadle, Ethel 
Chrisman, Nellie 
Courtright, Minnie 
Craig, Edith 
Crist, Lulu 
Denton, Florence 
Felmley, Mildred 
Fields, Cornelia 
Fields, Wray 
Frost, Ina 
Graves, Helen 



Hamill, Wahneita 
Haney, Alice 
Hargitt, Daisy 
Hibler, Bruce 
Hoff, Reva, 
Holmes, Effie 
Huffington, Grace 
Irvin, Hazel 
McNeil, Hazel 
Marshall, Clara 
Martin, Anna 
Miller, Nellie 



Moore, Sadie 
Pierson, Ida 
Railsback, Mary 
Reeder, Sallie 
Schad, Irma 
Schneider, Henrietta 
Shanklin, Ada 
Smitson, Nellie 
Thorp, Anna 
Underwood, Marie 
VanHook, Ethel 
Walker, Mildred 



Alspaugh, John 
Beckwith Harry 
Bence, Walter 
Bishop, Byron 
Bowen, Vernon 
Bowman, Leverett 
Briney, Harley 
Broadhead, Charles 
Burwell, Clyde 
Clark, Earl 
Colton, James 
Crigler, Burr 
Dick, Harry 
Dillon, Claire 
Dodge. Roy 
Duff, Walker 
Edmunds, Olin 
Ferguson, Clauds 
Ferguson, Lowell 

Girls enrolled. 3" 



Frost, Walter 
Gerber, Ralph 
Gipson, Ralph 
Hargitt, Leslie 
Hargitt, Merton 
Hargitt, Percy 
Holder, Charles 
Houchin, George 
Huffington, Herbert 
Irvin, Delmar 
Jackson, John 
Kennedy, Frank 
Kernson, Marcus, 
Kettering, Raymond 
Kuhn, Fred 
Lindblad, Nelson 
Mace, Lamar 
McMurry, Donald 
Morse, Heber 

boys, 56. Total, 93. 



Newell, Earl 
Palmer, Charles 
Patterson, Stephen 
Peasley, Warren 
Perry, Marion 
Perry, Myron 
Pierson, Elmer 
Pollitt, Thurman 
Reeves, Elton 
Reeves, Thornton 
Riley, Carl 
Rosenberry, Earl 
Sage, Harold 
Shirk, Willie 
Snow, Charles 
Vencill, Harold 
Wilson, Nat 
Wiltz, Paul 



Illinois State Normal University. 



103 



Members of the Annual Iustitute. 



Phoebe Alexander, 
Eva Archer, 
Grace Barnett, 
Alice J. Barr, 
Zella Baughman, 
Minnie D. Bradfield, 
Ina Briggs, 
Gertrude Brown, 
Minnie R. Brown, 
Alma W. Carlson, 
Mattie J. Carney, 
Maud Carroll, 
Esther Chapman, 
Aura Cheney, 
Esther Cleveland, 
Julia CofTman, 
Charlotte L. Davis, 
Lucy Davis, 
Hattie Deeble, 
Florence Donahey, 
Grace Donahey, 
Ella Doyle, 
Kate L. Edmunds, 
Imo Ewing, 
Grace Ferguson, 
Cathryn Fisher, 
Frances Fletcher, 
Ella Ford, 
Matie Frazee, 
Viola Freeland, 
Anna E. Gaylord, 
Delia M. Gracey, 
Mary Hallett, 
Phebe Hammond, 
Carrie Harlan, 
Jessie Harlford, 
Mary C. Harned, 



Pekin 

McLean 

Bement 

Moline 

Parkersburg 

Clinton 

Pana 

Hey worth 

Bloomington 

Bloomington 

Maroa 

Sheffield 

Greenville 

Pana 

Eureka 

Hume 

Charleston 

Pana 

New Albany 

Moline 

Moline 

Moline 

Maroa 

Minier 

Prairie City 

Bement 

Onarga 

Maroa 

Onarga 

Bochelle 

Plymouth 

Sorrento 

Assumption 

Mi. Sterling 

Eureka 

Prairie City 

Secor 



Lida Hazel, 
Mayme Hays, 
Kate Heaton, 
Josephine Heuyer, 
Adda M. Hunter, 
Junita E. Kerr, 
Hettie K. Kettenrinj 
Nora Kinzie, 
Maggie Kirkpatrick 
Bertha Knowles, 
Anna Lemon, 
Adelia Leonard, 
Ida Lysell, 
Onie McCracken, 
Mary McDermott, 
Jennie McKay, 
Mattie McMechan, 
Rebecca May, 
Mrs. Nellie Michels, 
Bessie Minch, 
Myrtle Mooberry, 
Lelia Moore, 
Ida Morefield, 
Julia A. Moulton, 
Lillian Nelson, 
Mary O'Donnell, 
Lavinna O'Neil, 
Maud Olmsted, 
Bessie Otto, 
Flora Parrish, 
Mary Penny, 
Grace E. Price, 
Alice Randall, 
Kate Rayhill, 
Emma J. Reading, 
Adda B. Read, 
Sarah Reid, 



Lincoln 
Bement 

Greenville 

Magnolia 

Clinton 

Shelbyville 

I, Pekin 

Tremont 

, Greenville 

Bloomington 

Aledo 

Moline 

Moline 

Pana 

Normal 

Moawequa 

Mendon 

Edinburg 

Assumption 

Washington 

Morton 

Westfield 

Pana 

Normal 

Champaign 

Lewiston 

Mt. Sterling 

Peoria 

Magnolia 

Mattoon 

Moline 

Mt. Palatine 

Bochelle 

Pana 

Pana 

Normal 

Chandlerville 



1U4 



Annual Catalogue 



June Rickets, Pana 

Catherine Riefenberg, CarUnville 



Daisy Roberts, 
Margaret Robinson, 
Lydia Ropp, 
Thusa Sabin, 
Jennie Schnebly, 
Anna B. Schulte, 
Mabel F. Seaman, 
Jessie Sharp, 
Frances Snyder, 
Millie Stem, 



Morton 

Mt. Sterling 

Washington 

Hoopeston 

Peoria 

Dixon 

Shelby ville 

Bement 

Rantoul 

Princeton 



Sarah E. Thompson, 
Emma Tingley, 
Erne Tull, 
Lillian Turnbull, 
Kate Victor, 
Nellie Watkins, 
Addie Wertz, 
Maggie Wilson, 
Louise Winner, 
Anna Woltman, 
Annie M. Wood. 
Murray Woods, . 



Fosterburg 

Ottawa 

Farmer City 

Normal 

Normal 

Pana 

Bloomington 

La Place 

Car mi 

Normal 

Secor 

Mattoon 



Mrs. Ida S. Stepheson, Shannon 



Charles Birdsall, 
Claudius Carter, 
J. J. Clark, 
S. B. Daniel, 

C. O. Du Bois, 
Walter S. Goode, 
Allen I. Hileman, 
T. A. Hilyer, 

D. L. Jeffers, 
A. P. Johnson, 
John T. Johnson, 



Swan Creek 

Cisco 

Normal 

Casey ville 

Mason City 

Palestine 

Bloomington 

Shelbyville 

Normal 

Rantoul 

Palestine 



Martin L. Mclntyre, NoTcomis 
Arthur McKee, Bloomington 

William M. Murray, Gridley 

Gilbert Randall, Pana 

John Reese, Normal 

Roscoe Roth, Rantoul 

Theodore Trost, Trenton 

Ira Virtue, Elizabeth 

Herbert C. Waddle, Triton, Iowa 
Harvey G. Waggoner, Eureka 



The following resolutions were adopted by the institute: 

Whereas, The President and Faculty of the Illinois State Normal 
University have kindly extended the privileges of the institution to 
the teachers of the State in this institute beginning May 25 and clos- 
ing June 12; and 

Whereas, All members of the school, both instructors and pupils, 
have exerted themselves in our behalf, adapting their work to our 
needs, evincing toward us great attention and courtesy; 

Whereas, We, as teachers, appreciate the kindness shown: 

Resolved, That we extend our sincere thanks to all concerned. 

Resolved, We take to ourselves the lessons shown and the truths 
brought forth, and that we devote ourselves to the application of 
these to our school work. 

Resolved, Since we have been helped by this institute we- earnestly 
urge its continuance. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be presented to the 
Faculty and to the local press for early publication. 

W. S. GOODE, 
A LICK J. BARR, } (nniniilhi . 

Km ma Ting key. 



Illinois State Normal University. 



105 



Genera! Summary, 



Normal Department, 
Annual Institute, 



Practice School 



Preparatory, 
Grammar Grades, . 
Intermediate Grades, . 
Primary Grades, 

Total in Practice School, 
Grand total in Normal University, 
Deduct names counted twice, 
Whole number of different students, 



789 
120 



7:, 

82 

149 

91 



397 
1,306 

48 
1,258 



JOG Annual Catalogue 



Alumni Register. 

1896. 



Class of i860. 

1. Sarah M. (Dunn) Strickler, 1413 North Nineteenth street. Phila- 

delphia, Pa. 4 years. 

2. Elizabeth J. (Mitchell) Christian, Bloomington, 111. 4 years. 

3. Frances A. (Peterson) Gastman. Died February 27, 1863. 2i years. 

4. Mary F. (Washburn) Hull. Died August 10, 1882. H years. 

5. Enoch A. Gastman. Superintendent City Schools, Decatur, 111. 

36 years. 

6. Peter Harper. Died May 30, 1887. 1 year. 

7. Silas Hayes, 2141 Glowner street, Los Angeles, Cal. 8 years. 

8. Joseph G. Howell. Killed at Fort Donelson. 1 year. 

9. John Hull, New Whatcom, Wash. 30 years. 

10. Edwin Philbrook. Died February 4, 1890. 20 years. 

Class of 1 86 1. 

11. Sophie (Crist) Gill. Died November, 1863. H years. 

12. Amanda O. Noyes. Died February 7, 1864. 2 years. 

13. John H. Burnham, Bloomington, 111. 1 year. 

14. Harvey J. Dutton, 808 South street, Springfield, Mo. 9 years. 

15. Aaron Gove, Denver, Col. Superintendent City Schools. 29 years. 

16. Moses I. Morgan. Died at Cleveland, O., April 10, 1895. 1 year. 

17. Henry B. Norton. Died June 22, 1885. 20 years. 

18. Peleg R. Walker, Rockford, 111. Superintendent City Schools. 

32 years. . 

Class of 1862. 

19. Sarah E. Beers, Canton, 111. 20 years. 

20. Elizabeth Carleton, 2653 Portland avenue, Minneapolis, Minn. 

22 years. 

21. Helen F. (Grennell) Guild, 372 Fairfield avenue, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

14 years. 

22. Esther M.. (Sprague) Legg, 666 Washington Boulevard, Chicago. 

L9 yea rs 



Note. The numbers.at thg righl Indicate the number of years of educational 
work done pince gradual [on 






Illinois State Normal University. 107 

23. Emma (Trimble) Bangs, Donnellson, 111. 12 years. 

24. Lorenzo D. Bovee, Chetopa, Kas. 13 years. 

25. James P. Ridlon, Olathe, Kas. 12 years. 

26. Logan H. Roots. Died at Little Rock, Ark., May 30, 1893. 1 year. 

Class of 1863. 

27. Mary A. Fuller. Died April, 1881. 10 years. 

28. Sarah F. (Gove) Baldwin, Peoria, 111. 3 years. 

29. Abbie (Reynolds) Wilcox, Northfield, Minn. 2 years. 

30. Sarah Hackett Stevenson, 322 North State street, Chicago. 

Physician, and Professor in Woman's College. 13 years. 

31. W. Dennis Hall, 435 Oakley avenue, Chicago. 15 years. 

32. Ebenezer D. Harris, Lincoln, Neb. 14 years. 

33. John H. Thompson. Died 1869. 3£ years. 

Class of 1864. 

34. Harriet E. Dunn, State Normal School, Los Angeles, Cal. 31i years. 

35. Anna (Grennell) Hatfield, La Grange, 111. 3 years. 

30. Edith T. (Johnson) Morley, 1524 Eighth avenue, North Minneap- 
olis, Minn. 6 years. 

37. Isabella Moore. 15 years. Died Jan. 14, 1888. 

38. Harriet E. Stewart. 

39. George W. Colvin, San Bernardino, Cal., 17 years. 

40. Lyman B. Kellogg, Emporia, Kas. 7 years. 

41. Philo A. Marsh. 1 year. Died April 5, 1887. 

Class of 1865. 

42. Olinda M. (Johnson) Nichols, 198 Walnut street, Aurora, 111. 3| 

years. 

43. AlmenaC. Jones, Canton, 111. 19 years. 

44. Lucinda J. (Stanard) Johnson, 019 East Tenth avenue, Winlield, 

Kas. 9 years. 
45 Bandusia Wakefield, 805 Ninth street, Sioux City, Iowa. 12 years. 

46. Thomas J. Burrill, Champaign, 111. Professor of Horticulture, 

University of Illinois. 31 years. 

47. John W. Cook, Normal, 111. President of Illinois State Normal 

University. 31 years. 

48. William Florin, Altamont, 111. 14 years. 

49. David M. Fulwiler, 554 Seventy-ninth street, station "P," Chicago, 

111. 5 years. 

50. Oscar F. McKim, Ft. Madison, la. 22 years. 

51. Adolph A. Suppiger, Edwardsville, 111. 20 years. 

52. Melancthon Wakefield, Cherokee, la. 3£ years. 



108 Annual Catalogue 

Class of 1866. 

53. Harriet M. (Case) Morrow, 1224 North Court street, Rockford, 

111. 14 years. 

54. Martha Foster, Minneapolis, Kas. 20 years. 

55. Harriet A. Fyffe, Hastings, Neb. 10 years. 

56. Margaret (McCambridge) Hurd, 1420 Pearl street, Denver, Col. 

1 year. 

57. Mary E. Pierce, Normal, 111. IT years. 

58. Alice (Piper) Blackburn, San Buena Ventura, Cal. 6 years. 

59. Helen M. (Plato) Wilbur, 258 Ontario street,Chicago, 111. 14 years. 
»60. Sarah E. (Raymond) Fitzwilliam, Bloomingtori, 111. 26 years. 

61. Olive A. (Rider) Cotton, Chicago. 7£ years. 

62. Julia E. (Standard) Frost, Pico Heights, Los Angeles, Cal. 15 

years. 

63. Nelson Case, Oswego, Kas. 1 year. 

64. Philo A. Clark, Madison, Neb. 4 years. 

65. John Ellis, Beatrice, Neb. 7 years. 

66. Joseph Hunter. Died April 17, 1880. 2 years. 

67. Richard Porter, Salina. Kas. 7 years. 

Class of 1867. 

68. Emily C. (Chandler) Hodgin, Richmond, Ind. 2 years. 

69. Emily H. (Cotton) Collins, 1400 Vermont street, Quincy, 111. 

9 years. 

70. Nellie Forman, care William C. Forman, office New York Sun 

N. Y. 6 years. 

71. Mary W. French, Decatur, 111. Assistant in High School. 28 

years. 

72. Eurana G. (Gorton) Hanna, Aurora, 111. 6 years. 

73. Mary R. Gorton. Died November 15, 1878. 11 years. 

74. Mary (Pennel) Barber, 22 Bryant avenue, Chicago. 5 years. 

75. Onias C. Barber, Effingham, 111. 3 years. 

76. John R. Edwards, Died April, 1871. 21 years. 

77. George S. Hinman, Clearwater, Cal. 5 years. 

78. Cyrus W. Hodgin, Richmond, Ind. Professor Earlham College. 

28 years. 

79. Fred J. Seybold. 

80. .James S. Stevenson, 3127 Sheridan avenue, St. Louis. Principal 

Clay School. 29 years. 

Class of 1868. 

81. Ruth E. (Barker) Hargrove, Nashville, Tenn. 5 years. 

82. Aim E. Bullock, Normal, 111. 4 years. 



Illinois State Normal University. 109 

83. Jemima S. Burson, Pasadena, Cal. 5X years. 

84. Lydia A. Burson, Pasadena Cal. 12! years. 

85. Etta S. (Dunbar) Kelso, Longmont, Col. 6 years. 

86. Anna C. Gates, 2121 Oregon avenue. Principal Grant and Gravois 

School, St. Louis. 28 years. 

87. Grace S. Hurwood, 1456 Castro street, Oakland, Cal. 21 years. 

88. Lucia (Kingsley) Manning, Anderson, Ind. 7 years. 

89. Eliza A. (Pratt) Kean, New Troy, Mich. 4 years. 

90. Emma T. (Robinson) Kleckner, 1215 Jones street, Sioux City, la- 

2i A^ears. 

91. Mary J. (Smith) Bogardus, Springfield, 111. I year. 

92. Cornelia Valentine. Died June 20, 1877. 8 years. 

93. Elma Valentine. Died April 14, 1871. 2| years. 

94. Clara E. Watts. Died June 4, 1884. 4 years. 

95. Stephen Bogardus, Springfield, 111. Principal Edwards school. 27 

years. 

96. William A. McBane, Metropolis, 111. 3 years. 

97. Henry McCormick, Normal, 111. Vice-President and Professor of 

Geography and History, Illinois State Normal University. 28 
years. 

98. Jacob R. Rightsell, Little Rock, Ark. Superintendent City 

Schools. 20 years. 

99. William Russell. President Southland College and Normal Insti- 

tute, Southland, Ark. 25 years. 

Class of 1869. 

100. Lizzie S. Alden, 1119 Congress street, Emporia, Kas. 24 years. 

101. Melissa (Benton) Overman, Springfield, Mass. 4 years. 

102. Ella K. Briggs, 158 South Galena avenue, Freeport, 111. 23 years. 

103. Lucretia (Davis) Ramsey. Died 18—. 2 years. 

104. Jane (Pennell) Carter, Danville, 111. 6| years. 

105. Maria L. (Sykes) Nichols, 5123 Wentworth avenue, Chicago. 7 

years. 

106. Helen (Wadleigh) Willis, Cole Camp, Mo. 3 years. 

107. Ben C. Allensworth, Pekin, 111. Postmaster. 14 years. 

108. Alfred C. Cotton, Physician, 198 South Wood street, Chicago. 

6 years. 
Charles H. Crandell, Batavia, 111. 22 years. 
Hugh R. Edwards, Oshkosh, Wis. 15 years. 
William R. Edwards, Tracy, Minn. 8 years. 
James W. Hayes, Urbana, 111. Principal Public Schools. 26 

years. 
Charles Howard. 



HO Annual Catalogue 

114. Isaac F. Klcckner. Died March 4, 1891. 4 years. 

115. George G. Manning, Anderson, Ind. 23 years. 

116. George W. Mason. Died October 8, 1887. 8 years. 

117. Charles W. Moore, Storm Lake, la. 13 years. 

118. Christopher D. Morey, Surgeon, Aurora, 111. 5 years. 

Class of 1870. 

119. Louisa C. ( Allen) Gregory, Washington, D. C. 9 years. 

120. Barbara Denning, Normal, 111, 18 years. 

121. Alice Emmons. Died October 2, 1871. 2 months. 

122. Clara E. Higby, 146 Park ave., Chicago. Assistant in West Di- 

vision High School. 26 years. 

123. Emma (Howard) Gardner, Orange, Cal. 4 years. 

124. Margaret E. (Hunter) Regan, 609 66th street, Englewood. 111. 4 

years. 

125. Mary L. (Kimberly) Perry, 164 Canfield street, Detroit, Mich. 4 

years. 

126. Mary D. LeBaron, Mattaporsett. Mass. 13 years. 

127. Letitia (Mason) Quine, 3160 Indiana ave., Chicago, 111. 1 year. 

128. Adella (Nance) Shilton, Kewanee, 111. 3| years. 

129. Adelaide V. Rutherford, Girard, III. 6 years. 

130. Fannie (Smith) Cole, care of Wm. H. Wing, Elgin, 111. 10 years. 

131. Armada (Thomas) Bevan, Atlanta, 111. 7 years. 

132. Marian (Weed) Martin, 1611 Michigan, ave., Chicago. 2 years. 

133. Ben W. Baker, President Chaddock College, Quincy, III. 7 years. 

134. Joseph Carter, Superintendent Public Schools, Danville, 111. 174 

years. 

135. Robert A. Childs, Hinsdale, 111. 3 years. 

136. James W. Dewell, Barry, 111. 16 years. 

137. 11. Arthur Edwards, Banker, Peru, Ind. 8 years. 

138. Samuel W. Garman, Cambridge, Mass. Assistant in iVgassiz's 

Museum since 1873. 2 years. 

139. John W. Gibson, Sterling. 23 years. 

140. Ben Hunter, Mt. Vernon, Ind. 5 years. 

141. John W. Lummis, 1609 West First street, Grand Island, Neb. 

Teacher in Business and Normal College. 16 years. 

142. John H. Parr. Principal Chicago Preparatory School, 3715 Lang- 

ley avenue 15 years. 
1 1. - :. Levi T. Regan, 609 Sixty-sixth street, Englewood, 111. Principal 

Sherman School. 26 years. 
144. Wade II. Richardson, 602 Frederick street, Milwaukee, Wis. 12 

are. 
I 15. John W. Smith, room 55, ISarth block, Denver. Col. 12 years. 



Illinois State Normal University. Ill 

Class of 1 87 1. 

146. Charlotte C. (Blake) Myers, 315 South Vermilion street, Streator, 

111. 11 years. 

147. Isabella S. (Houston) Tabor, Minden, N.Y. 3 years. 

148. Julia E. Kennedy, The Temple, Chicago, 111. 17 years. 

149. Harriet E. (Kern) Walker, 828 Fifth street, Des Moines, Iowa. 5 

years. 

150. Celestia M. Mann. Died 1887. 3 years. 

151. Frances L. Moroney, Minneapolis, Minn. 19 years. 

152. Frances L. (Rawlings) Cunningham, Princeton, 111. 4 years. 

153. Isabel (Rugg) Reed, Santa Barbara, Cal. 3 years. 

154. Frances (Shaver) Thompson, 3726 Langley avenue, Chicago, 111. 

2 years. 

155. Emma G. Strain, 418 West Broadway, Louisville, Ky. 11 years. 

156. Frances (Weyand) Latham, Wills Point, Tex. li years. 

157. William C. Griffith. Died January 13, 1892. 5 years. 

158. Henry F. Holcomb. Died October, 1871. 

159. Andrew T. Lewis, room 614, Chamber of Commerce Building, Port- 

land, Ore. 3 years. 

160. T. A. H. Norman, Martinsville, 111. 14 years. 

161. Edgar D. Plummer, Heyworth, 111. 1 year, during course. 

162. James O. Polhemus. Died August, 1879. 3| years. 

163. James R. Richardson, Tonti. 111. 18% years. 

164. R. Morris Waterman. Died October, 1871. 

165. John X. Wilson, Austin, Minn. 13 years. 

166. John P. Yoder. Died at Needy, Ore., June 1, 1894. 22 years. 

Class of 1872. 

167. Anna G. Bowen, 127 Loomis street, Chicago. 6 years. 

168. Martha Flemming, room 52, Kimball Hall, Chicago. 24 years. 

169. Lenore Franklin, 6456 Dickey street, Chicago. 23 years. 

170. Mary C. (Furry) Talbot, Sanfordville, 111. 16 years. 

171. Clara (Gaston) Forbes, Champaign, 111. 1 } T ear. 

172. Anna M. Gladding. Died March. 1882. 4 years. 

173. Rachael M. (Hickey) Carr, M.D., Professor of Histology, Wo- 

man's Medical College, Chicago, 111. 10 years. 

174. Sara C. Hunter, 615 Sixty-sixth street. Station O, Chicago, 111. 

Head Assistant Henry Clay School. 22! years. 

175. Alza (Karr) Blount, Phenix, Ariz. 3 years. 

176. Martha G. (Knight) Adam, Normal, 111. 17 years. 

177. Julia F. (Mason) Parkinson. Died August 6, 1879. 3! years. 

178- Emma A. (Monroe) McCracken, 6400 Emerald avenue, Englewood, 
111. 15 years. 



112 Annual Catalogue 

179. Julia (Moore) Byerly, 808 W. G street, Urbana, 111. 1 year. 

180. Mary V. Osburn, 2655 Washing-ton avenue, St. Louis. 20 years. 

181. Flora (Pennell) Parr, 3715 Langley avenue, Chicago, 111. 12 years. 

182. Alice B. Philips, 203 Adelphi street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 3 years. 

183. Louise Ray, 313 Fourteenth street, Portland, Oregon. 10 years. 

184. Alpha Stuart, Principal Jefferson Street School, Bloomington, 

address Normal, 111. 23 years. 

185. Gertrude (Town) Beggs. Died May 15, 1888. 11 years. 

186. Edith (Ward) Roach, Watsonville, Cal. 10 years. 

187. Edwin F. Bacon, Normal School, Oneonta, N. Y. 21 years. 

188. Robert H. Beggs, 2427 Ogden street, Denver, Col., Principal 

Ward School. 24 years. 

189. George Blount, Phenix, Ariz. 24 years. 

190. James M. Greeley. Died 1883. 2 years. 

191. Frank W. Hullinger, Clergyman, Farmington, 111. 6 years. 

192. Elisha W. Livingston, Capron, 111. 6 years. 

193. Thomas L. McGrath. Died , 1888. b years. 

194. CharlesD. Mariner, Superintendent City Schools, Stephen, Minn. 

22 years. 

195. Samuel W. Paisley. Died February 3, 1878. 5 years. 

196. Frank E. Richey, Lawyer, Laclede Building, St. Louis, Mo. 3 

years. 

197. Espy L. Smith, M.D., 974 W. Polk street, Chicago. 7 years. 

198. John H. Stickney, Toulon, 111. Principal Public Schools. 24 

years. 

199. William R. Wallace. Died 1876. 2 years. 

200. James M. Wilson, 2412 Dodge street, Omaha, Neb. Teacher in 

City High School. 12 years. 

Class of 1873. 

201. Lura (Bullock) Elliott, Peoria, 111. 3i years. 

202. Mary M. Cox, 312 Van Ness avenue, San Francisco, Cal. 15 years. 

203. Kllen S. Edwards, Bloomington, 111. 4 years. 

204. Ida L. Foss, Chicago. 14 years. 

205. Mary L. (Hawley) Richardson, 602 Frederick street, Milwaukee, 

Wis. 7 years. 
200. II. Amelia Kellogg, 103 Thirty-sixth street, Chicago. Teacherof 
Psychology, City Training School. 21 years. 

207. L. Effie Peter, Topeka, Kas. 17 years. 

208. UnaV. (Sutherland) Brown. Died July 25, 1894. 7f years. 
20!». May I. Thomas, 535 West Sixty-first street, Chicago. 17 years. 

210. Emma (Wame) Hall. Sycamore, III. 3 years. 

211. L. P. Brigham. Died February, 1892, in Manning, Ta. 6 years. 



Illinois State Normal University. 113 

212. Charles DeGarmo, Swarthmore, Pa. President Swarthmore Col- 

ledge. 20 years. 

213. Jasper F. Hayes, Pasadena, Tex. 10 years: 

214. Erneis R. E. Kimbrough, Danville, 111. 1 year. 

215. George M. LeCrone, Effingham, 111. H years. 

216. Walter C. Lockwood, Los Angeles, Cal. Paid tuition in full after 

graduation. 6 months. 

217. Dewitt C. Roberts, Ordway, Col. 11 years. 

218. Arthur Shores, Great Falls, Mont. 3 years. 

219. John B. Stoutemeyer, Bradley, 111. 3 years. 

220. Felix B. Tait, Decatur, 111. 2 years. 

221. J. Lawson Wright, Vineland, Cal. 16 years. 

Class of 1874. 

222. Emily Alden, Fontanelle, la. 15 years. 

223. Lida (Brown) McMurry, Assistant Training Teacher, Illinois 

State Normal University. 16 years. 

224. Eunice Corwin, Lincoln, 111. 19 years. 

225. S. Alice Judd, Jefferson High School, Chicago, 111. 21i years. 

226. Sarah M. (Littlefield) Simmes, Kalama, Wash. 6 years. 

227. Mary (McWilliams) Burford, Hoopeston, 111. 4 years. 

228. M. Ella Morgan, 1207 L street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 22 

years. 

229. Elizabeth (Peers) Lockwood, Glendale, Ariz. Paid tuition after 

graduation. 

230. Emma (Stewart) Brown. Died August 1, 1880. 4 years. 

231. Maggie (Woodruff) Evans, Leavenworth, Kas. 2 years. 

232. I. Eddy Brown, State Secretary Y.M.C.A., 148 Madison street, 

Chicago. 6 years. 

233. Francis W. Conrad, Principal of F. St. School, San Bernardino, 

Cal. 20 years. 

234. John N. Dewell, Chapin, III. 16 years. 

235. David S. Elliott, Superintendent of Public Schools. Red Bud, 111. 

20 years. 

236. William A. Evans, Leavenworth, Kas. Principal of High School. 

21 years. 

237. Thomas E. Jones. 9 years. 

238. William P. McMurry, Normal. 111. 2Jtf years. 

239. Elinzer M. Prindle, Patterson, 111. 9 years. 

240. Carlton H. Rew. M.D., Waco, Tex. 8 years. 

241. William J. Simpson, Sigel, 111. 7 years. 

242. Harry A. Smith, Clergyman. 1108 Broadway, Bay City, Mich. 4 

years. 



114 Annual Catalogue 

243. J. N. Wilkinson, Emporia, Kas. Principal Training Department, 

State Normal School. 22 years. 

Class of 1875. 

244. Margarita (McCullough) Sanders. 228 Guthrie street, Ottawa. 8 

years. 

245. Josephine McHugh, 2301 Douglas street, Omaha, Neb. 20 years. 

246. Florence Ohr, 3631 South Hamilton avenue, Chicago, 18 years. 

247. Henrietta Watkins, Normal, 111. 3 years. 

248. Mary A. Watkins, Normal, 111. 1 year. 

249. David Ayres, 4638 Emerald avenue, Chicago. 5 years. 

250. Robert L. Barton. Chippewa Falls, Wis. Superintendent City 

Schools. 19J- years. 

251. Albert D. Beckhart, Clergyman, Anita, la. 4 years. 

252. Lewis O. Bryan, Van Buren, Ark. 4 years. 

253. W. T. Crow, Georgetown, 111. Principal of Schools. 7 years. 

254. James Ellis, Welsh, La. 7 years. 

255. Judd M. Fisk, San Antonio. Tex. (5 years. 

256. Justin L. Hartwell, Dixon, 111. 13} 2 years. 

257. Josiah P. Hodge, Alton, 111. 2 years. 

258. U. Clay McHugh. Died July 11, 1878. 1)4 years. 

259. W. S. Mills, BrookLyn, N.Y. Principal School No. 75. 16 years. 

260. James N. Mosher, Smith Center, Kas. Principal Public Schools. 

16 years. 

261. John L. Shearer, Napa City, Cal. Principal Public Schools. 21 

years. 

262. Benjamin F. Stocks. Garden City, Kas. 9 years. 

Class of 1876. 

263. Mary L. (Bass) Wallace, Delavan. 111. 9 years. 

264. Louisa C. Larrick. Died 1885. 6 years. 

265. Mrs. Amanda M. Pusey, Seattle, Wash. 16 years. 

266. George H. Beatty, Decatur, 111. 12 years. 

267. Daniel S. Buterbaugh, Principal Everett School. Alameda, Cal- 

17 years. 

26*. William H. Chamberlin, Chicago. Teacher of Science, South 

Division High School. 19 years. 
2<i'.t. A. M. Crawford, Hillings, Mont. 2 years. 

270. George W. Dinsmore. Died 1882. 2 years. 

271. Lewis C. Daugherty, Principal Ward School, Bock Island, 111. 20 

years. 

272. J. Calvin Hanna, 29 South Sixth street, Columbus. O. Principal 

of South High School. 17 years. 



Illinois State Normal University. 115 

273. Benjamin S. Hedges. Died 1876. 

274. Charles L. Howard, Principal Columbia School, St. Louis, Mo. 

19 years. 

275. John T. Johnston, Santa Barbara, Cal. 94 years. 

276. Claudius B. Kinyon, Physician, Rock Island. 

277 Joseph F. Lyon, 618 Short street, Fort Scott, Kas. 17 years. 

278. Truman B. Mosher. Galena, Kas. Superintendent City Schools. 

20 years. 

279. Dewitt C. Tyler. Physician Clifton, Kas. 3 years. 

280. Leroy B. Wood. 114 Third avenue, North Minneapolis. Minn. 

Class of 1877. 

281. Mary A. Anderson, The Portland Block, St. Paul, Minn. Teacher 

of History, Central High School. 18 years. 

282. Agnes E. (Ball) Thomas, Thomasville, 111. 12 years. 

283. Emma E. (Corbett) Parmelee, Normal, 111. 12 years. 

284. Nettie (Cox) Smith, Hudson, 111. 3 years. 

285. Adeline M. (Goodrich) Soule, M.D., Freeport 111. 

286. Anna L. (Martin) Ayers, 4638 Emerald avenue, Chicago. 3 years- 

287. Selina M. (Regan) Hunter, Frankfort Station, 111. 4 years. 

288. Laura A. Varner, Santa Barbara, Cal. 19 years. 

289. Wilmis (Varner) Metzger, Geyserville, Cal. 4 years. 

290. Emily Wing, Jacksonville, 111. 3 years. 

291. Levi D. Berkstresser, 509 Fourth avenue, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

292. W. I. Berkstresser, Clergyman, Martinsville, III. 2 years. 

293. Richard G. Bevan, Atlanta 111. 4i years. 

294. Edwin R. Faulkner, Superintendent City Schools, Texarkana, 

Texas. 16 years. 

295. Hiram R. Fowler, Elizabethtown, 111. 8 years. 

296. Frank B. Harcourt. New York City. 2 years. 

297. George L. Hoffman, Lawyer, Mt. Carroll, 111. Paid tuition in full 

since graduation. 

298. Albert Snare, Cozad, Neb. Principal Public Schools. 17 years. 

299. Levi Spencer, San Fernando, Cal. 14 years. 

300. Edwin R, Swett, Chicago. 

Class of 1878. 

301. Mary M. (Baird) Burger, 727 East 5th street, Pueblo. Col. 13 

years. 

302. P. Evangeline (Gaudy) Mitchell, Areola, 111. 1 year. 

303. Jessie (Dexter) Wilder, Belding, Mich. 1 year. 

304. Eugenia (Faulkner) Williams, 315 Virginia avenue, Kansas City, 

Kas. 10 years. 



116 Annual Catalogue. 

305. Flora M. (Fuller) Boyd, Messina, Cal. 9 years. 

306. Sarah C. Martin. Died at Evanston, 111., March 7, 1890. 

307. Ida (Philbrick) Gaston. Died July 2, 1888. 

308. Frances Preston. Died May 3, 1882. 4 years. 

309. Florence A. Richardson. Died May 5, 1882. 4 years. 

310. Helen L. Wykoff, 706 N. 19th street, Omaha, Neb. Principal 

Ward School. 15 years. 

311. Osci J. Bainum, Olney, 111. Principal Public Schools. 18 years. 

312. John T.Bowles, DeKalb, Til. Principal Public Schools. 18 years. 

313. Oliver P. Burger. Died June 10, 1889. 2 years. 

314. Gilbert A. Burgess, Monticello, 111. 9 years. 

31o. A. C Butler, Kewanee, 111. Superintendent of Schools. 18 years. 

316. Andrew W. Elder, Denver, Col. Principal Ward School. 16^ 

years. 

317. Willis C. Glidden, Physician, Beloit, Kas, Taught 3 years dur- 

ing course. 

318. C. G. Laybourn, Minneapolis, Minn. 2 years. 

319. Edwin H. Rishel, Atoka, Indian Ty. Superintendent Baptist 

Academy for Indians. 15 years. 

320. William N. Spencer, Yorba, Cal. 11 years. 

321. George I. Talbot, DeKalb, 111. 12 years. 

Class of 1879. 

322. S. Annette Bowman, Moscow, Idaho. Teacher of Drawing and 

Wood Carving in University of Idaho. 15 years. 

323. Amanda M. Crawford, Central High School, «Buffalo,N. Y. 8 years. 

324. Mary S. (Cummings) Kirk, 46 L Sigel street, Decatur, 111. 2 years. 

325. Daisy (Hubbard) Pollit, Frankfort, Ky. 9 years. 

326. Harriet E Morse, Rockford, 111. 16 years. 

327. Nettie (Porter) Powers, Omaha, Neb. 6| years. 

328. Lizzie (Ross) Cook, 143 Racine avenue, Chicago. 111. 6 years. 

329. Julia (Scott) Hunting, Berea, Ky. 12 years. 

330. Emily A. (Sherman) Boyer, Engle wood, 111. 2 years. 

331. Jennie L. (Wood) Holmes. Died December 5, 1891. 9 years. 

332. E. R. Boyer, Englewood, 111., 645 Sixty-second street. Teacher of 

Biology in High School. 15 years. 

333. Charles R. Cross, Superintendent of Public Schools, Oconomo- 

woc, Wis. 17 years. 

334. Silas Y. Gillan, 487 Milwaukee street, Milwaukee, Wis. Editor 

Western Teacher, Teacher of Civics and Pedagogy in National 
(icruian-American Teachers' Seminary. 17 years. 

335. Horace E. Powers, Omaha, Neb., No. 309 Karbach Block. 

336. William C. Ramsey, Stockton, Cal. Principal Business College. 

14 yean . 



Illinois State Normal I university. 117 

Class of 1880. 

337. Elizabeth Baumgardner. Training Teacher, Springfield, 111. 15 

years. 

338. Helen M. (Baxter) Brakefield, Griggsville, 111. 3 years. 

339. Lillian M. (Brown) Fairchild, Berea, Ky. 6 years. 

340. May (Hewett) Reeder, Chicopee Falls, Mass. 1 year. 

341. Helen F. (Moore) Sanders. 4 years. 

342. Isabel (Overman) Diehl, 731 Garfield avenue, Pasadena, Cal. 10 

years. 

343. Mary E. (Parker) Bixby, McPherson, Kas. 3 years. 

344. Grace N. Weeks, Orlando, Fla. 3 years. 

345. James W. Adams, Professor of English, University of Nebraska, 

Lincoln. 10i years. 

346. Andrew L. Anderson, Virginia, 111. 8 years. 

347. Alpheus A. Dillon, Normal, 111. 1 year. 

348. James M. Harper, Conway Springs, Kas. 4 years. 

349. Woodman R. Marriet, M.D.,Capron, 111. 4£ years. 

350. Carleton E. Webster, Chicago. Principal Greenwood avenue 

School. 16 years. 

351. Edgar Wyatt, Principal of Schools, Strong City, Kas. 5 years. 

Class of 1881. 

352. Sarah A. Anderson, Virginia, 111. 14 years. 

353. Clara A. (Webster) Bowles, DeKalb, 111. 9£ years. 

354. Mary R. (Gaston) Tear, Chicago. 3 years. 

355. Addie (Gillan) Estee, 1422 Wells street, Milwaukee, Wis. 2| 

years. 

356. Mary J. (Gillan) Eastman, Calumet, Mich. 14 years. 

357. Belle Hobbs, DeKalb, 111. 15 years. 

358. Anna P. Knight, Normal, 111. f year. 

359. Helen Middlekauff. 5 years. 

360. Celia S. Mills, Fairman, 111. 6 years. 

361. Carrie Rich, 1224 Henry street, Alton, 111. 14 years. 

362. Mary A. Springer. 1^ years. 

363. Lizzie P. Swan, Normal School, Milwaukee, Wis. Cataloguer 

Wisconsin Normal Schools. 10 years. 

364. William H. Bean, Blue Mound, 111. 1 year. 

365. Isaac L. Betzer, Topeka, Kas. 5 years. 

366. Elmer E. Brown. Professor of Pedagogy, University of Cali- 

fornia, Berkeley. 9 years. 

367. James B. Estee, 1422 Wells street, Milwaukee, Wis. 1 year. 

368. G. Frank Miner, Springfield, 111. Secretary State Board of Pub- 

lic Charities. 12 years. 



118 Annual Catalogue 

369. Wendell F. Puckett, Wichita, Kas. 

370. Edward Shannon, Quincy, III. 8 years. 

371. Elmer E. Shinkle. Died August, 1881. 

372. John H. Tear, Chicago. Principal Washington School. 15 years. 

373. Nathan T. Veatch, Rushville, 111. Principal Schools. 15 years. 

374. Charles B. Walter, 1522 Atlantic avenue, Brooklyn, N.Y. 9 years. 

Class of 1882. 

375. Mattie V. (Bean) Garwood, Blue Mound, 111. 3 years. 

376. Matilda Glanville. Died 1883, 1 year. 

377. Camilla Jenkins, Butler, 111. 8 years. 

378. Lida A. (Kelly) Bragg, 611 South Eleventh street, St. Joseph, 

Mo. 7 years. 

379. Cora (Lurton) Warwick, Niirnberg, Stabrus str., \ Germany. 3 

years. 

380. Mattie B. (Maxwell) McPherson, Perry, Iowa. 12 years. 

381. Lillian W. (Pillsbury) Gates, 2725 North Lincoln street, Ravens- 

wood, 111. 4 years. 

382. Mattie L. Powell, 2539 Capitol avenue, Omaha, Neb. 14 years. 

383. Florence (Hubbard) Leavenworth, 215 and 216 Philadelphia Bank 

Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 4£ years. 

384. Louisa M. Scott, 1032 Chicago avenue, Evanston, 111. 14 years. 

385. Lettie J. (Smiley) Eraser, Plainfield, 111. 3 years. 

386. Charles Fordyce. Professor of Biology, Wesleyan University, 

Lincoln, Neb. 14 years. 

387. Jesse F. Hannah, Belvidere, 111. '1% years. 

388. James V. McHugh. Lawyer, Minneapolis, Minn. 3 years. 

389. Murray M. Morrison, Vinton, la. 6 years. 

390. George W. Reeder, Trinidad, Col. 11 years. 

391. Milton R. Regan, M.D.. Eureka Springs, Ark. 5 years. 

392. Edwin E. Rosenberry. Mt. Sterling. Died August 30. 1890. 8 years. 

393. Charles N. Smith, Physician, Homer, 111. Paid tuition in full. 

394. William J. Smith. 1 year. 

395. Uvens W. Thomas, room (512, 21 Quincy street, Chicago. 2 years. 

396. Franklin L. Williams, Clay Center, Kas. 2 years. 

Class of 1883. 

397. Lou M. Allen, Box 84, Colorado Springs, Col. \\ X A years. 

398. Lincoln I. D. Burr, Healdsburg, Cal. 9^ years. 
.'{99. Mae F. (Downey) Cox, Hudson, 111. 2 years. 

100. Elizabeth S. (Glanville) Houston, Polo, 111. 3 years. 

401. Nannie R. Gray. Studying in Germany. 12 years. 

402. Mary E. (Hubbard) Beath, Chicago. 5 years. 



Illinois State Normal University. 119 

403. Caroline A. (Humphrey) Reid, Murrayville, 111. 2 years. 

404. Lucy Johnson. Teacher in Kalamazoo College. 623 South street, 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 9£ years. 

40r>. Mary E. (Kuhn) Kipp, Minonk, 111. 10 years. 

406. Flora A. (Lewis) Rosenberry, Normal, 111. 4i years. 

407. Alice (McCormick) Trowbridge, Ravenswood, 111. 3 years. 

408. Martha G. (Martin) Skewis, Marcus, la. 3 years. 

409. Hattie Paddock, 5701 Dearborn street, Chicago. 12 years. 

410. Ada L. Parsons, Woodstock, 111. 9 years. 

411. May M. (Parsons) Glotfelter, Atchison, Kas. 7 years. 

412. Ida M. Porter, Normal, 111. i year. 

413. Augusta E. Root, 317 Washington street, Dorchester, Mass. 10 

years. 

414. Harriet Scott, Rockford, 111. 4 years. 

415. Carrie E. (Smith) Turner, Mt. Sterling, 111. 4 years. 

416. S. Elouise (Smith) Crawford, Hamline, Minn. 1 year. 

417. Mary C. Spottswood, Rockford, 111. Principal Ward School. 13 

years. 

418. Walter T. Blake, 178 Otter street, Stockton, Cal. 

419. Frank Burr, Healdsburg, Cal. 4 years. 

420. Andrew Engel, 9227 State street, Chicago, 111. Lilydale School. 

13 years. 

421. John L. Hall, Fernwood, 111. 2 years. 

422. George Howell, Scranton, Pa. Superintendent of Schools. 12 

years. 

423. J. M. Humer, Waverly, 111. 10 years. 

424. John S. Ketterman, Ida Grove, la. 5 years. 

425. William S. Lewis, 136 Merchant street, Decatur, 111. 

426. Cornelius L. Perry, Normal, 111. 7 years. 

427. Eugene W. Pinkley, Kingsburg, Cal. Principal Public Schools- 

8 years. 

428. Rudolph R. Reeder, Chicopee Falls, Mass. 10 years. 

429. David W. Reid, Physician, Murrayville. 6 years. 

430. Edward R. Ristine, Mt. Vernon, la. Teacher in Cornell College. 

12 years. 

431. Fred W. Smedley, Student in University of Chicago. 12 years. 

432. Charles H. Tallmadge, C, B. & N. Ry., St. Paul, Minn. Paid 

tuition in full. 1 year. 

433. John N. Wayman, Englewood, 111. Teacher in High School. 13 

years. 

Class of 1884. 

434. M. Emma Biggs, Boulevard School, Chicago. 1H years. 

435. Zella Campbell. Died February 23, 1892. 



120 Annual Catalogue 

436. Ella J. Caughey, 1320 Eleventh street, Seattle, Wash. 11£ years. 

437. Carrie A. (Dillon) Milliken. Died December 28, 1892. 2 years. 

438. Clarissa E. Ela. Teacher of Drawing", Illinois State Normal Uni- 

versity. 11 years. 

439. Carrie M. (Fuller) Judd, Dixon, 111. 4 years. 

440. Carrie A. (Gifford) Harvey, Kansas City, Mo. 3 years. 

441. Mary M. (Hall) Husted. Private School, Blooming-ton, 111. 11 

years. 

442. Annie (Hendron) Smith, Mt. Carroll, 111. 9 years. 

443. Kate (Lunger) Thorp, Boston, Mass. 6 years. 

444. Harriet M. (Montgomery) McClure, Atlanta, 111. 10 years. 

445. Cora J. Walker, Dwight, 111. 'S l s years. 

446. Clara A. (Whitcomb) Leaf, Salem, Kas. 6 years. 

447. Edward Aldrich, Crystal River, Pla. 1£ years. 

448. David H. Chaplin. Milpilas, Cal. Principal Public Schools. 9 

years. 

449. William D. Edmunds, Gardner, III. 9 years. 

450. Nathan A. Harvey, Kansas City, Mo. Teacher of Science in High 

School. 11 years. 

451. William R. Heath, Room 1009, 100 Washington street, Chicago. 

4 years. 

452. Leander Messick, Hill City, Kas. 3 years. 

453. Orris J. Milliken, Principal of Fallon School, Chicago. 11| years. 

454. Austin C. Rishel, Chicago. Teacher of Science in Lake View 

High School. 11 years. 

455. Orville T«. Rogers, Clergyman, Rushville, 111. 2 years. 

456. Monroe W. Utz. Died 1893. 3£ years. 

457. James C. Wood, Lusk, Wyo. 3 years. 

Class of 1885. 

458. M. Joice Adams, Normal, 111. 6£ years. 

459. Sue P. Adams, Normal, 111. 2 years. 

460. Eva M. (Blanchard) Snedaker, box 245, Pomona, Cal. 1| years. 

461. Helen A. Dewey, Colorado Springs, Colo. 10 years. 

462. Agnes (Elliott) Johnson, Ichoufu, China. 3 years. 

463. Maggie J. Grant, Sunny Hill, 111. 9 years. 

464. Ruby C. (Gray) Jordan, Sterling, Ky. 3 years. 

465. Olive B. (Hubbard) Partridge, 114 South Twenty-ninth street, 

Omaha, Neb. 7 years. 

466. Luella (McVey) Stafford, Maroa, 111. 4 years. 

467. Anna Reid, 918 John Street, Seattle, Wash. 10 years. 

468. Katie (Saltzman) Collins, 1003 West Front street, Bloomington, 

111. 6 years. 



Illinois State Normal University. 121 

469. Helen E. (Savage) Rowley, Lockport, 111. 4 years. 

470. Lucy E. (Stewart) Brown, Champaign, 111. 4 years. 

471. Emma (Werley) Haiising, Chapaca, Washington. 7 years. 

472. Alexander Cation, Walla Walla, Wash. 6 years. 

473. Thornton R. Fraser. Drowned while in charge of Golconda Pub- 

lic Schools. 

474. Louis H. Galbreath. Principal of Training Department, State 

Normal School, Winona, Minn. 6 years. 

475. John H. Glotfelter, Atchison, Kan. Superintendent City Schools. 

10 years. 

476. Charles L. Howard, Arrowsmith, Hi. 3 years. 

477. Lyon Karr, Eureka, 111. 9 years. 

478. John R. Kellogg, Woodstock, 111. 9 years. 

479. Thomas B. McMurray, Divernon, III. 8 years. 

480. John C. Mountjoy, 5648 Drexel avenue. Chicago. 10 years. 

481. Cornelius S. Tarbox, Mont Clare, 111. 9 years. 

482. Oliver R. Trowbridge, 63 Metropolitan Block, Chicago, 4 years. 

483. John J. Wilkinson, Student in Germany. 7 years. 

484. Thomas E. Will, Professor of Economic Science, State Agricul- 

tural College, Manhattan, Kan. 7 years. 

485. Isaac H. Yoder, Wellington, 111. Principal Public Schools. 10 

years. 

Class of 1 886. 

486. Septina Baker, Oakland, Cal. 6 years. 

487. Lutie A. (Bush) Saltonstall. Died January 9. 1889. 1 year. 

488. Theodora Gildemeister. Training Teacher Southern Illinois 

State Normal University, Carbondale, 111. 10 years. 

489. Cora Glidden, De Kalb. 6 years. 

490. Lucy D. (Gray) Gridley, Rapid City, S. D. 3 years. 

491. Saidee J. Gray, Cairo, 111. 10 years. 

492. Minnie B. (Kelley) Bowles, M. D., Joliet, 111. 5 years. 

493. Mary L. Kimball, Bloomington, 111. 507 West Locust street. 

Teacher of English Literature, High School. 10 years. 

494. Margaret H. J. Lampe, 619 East Chestnut street, Bloomington, 

111. 8 years. 

495. Florence (McVay) Custer, Pontiac, 111. 7 years. 

496. Hattie A. Mills. Died July 15, 1890. 4 years. 

497. Mary (Piper) Anderson, Charleston, 111. 8 years. 

498. Alma E. (Ross) Belsley. Died October 6, 1895. li years. 

499. Olive Sattley, Taylorville, 111. 10 years. 

500. May (Shinn) Giddings, Normal, 111. 2i years. 

501. Eva G. (Telford) McClurkin, Sparta, 111. 6 years. 



122 Annual Catalogue 

502. Juliet A. (Wallace) Hitt, 10616 Prospect avenue, Chicago, 111. 

6 years. 

503. David W. Creekmur, 933 Marquette Bldg., Chicago, 111. 8 years. 
50-4. Levi R. Fitzer. ( 'apron, 111. County Superintendent. 8 years. 

505. John H. Fleming. Pleasant Hill, 111. 6 years. 

506. Charles W. Hart, Marengo, 111. Principal Public Schools. 10 

years. 

507. Robert E. Hieronymous, Eureka, 111. Professor of English, Eu- 

reka College. 8 years. 

508. Martin L. Mclntyre, Nokomis, 111. 8 years. 

509. Samuel D. Magers, Principal High School, Dallas, Tex. 7 years. 

510. Thomas O. Moore, Ottawa. 111. Teacher in Township High 

School. 10 years. 

511. Clarence H. Watt, 304 Forty-first street, Chicago, 111. 7 years. 

512. Walter J. Watts, Room 41. 95 Clark street, Chicago, 111. 2 years. 

Class of 1887. 

513. Jennie (Armstrong) Manning, Harrisburg, Ohio. years. 

514. Mary E. Coffey, Oak Park. 111. 9 years. 

515. Rosalia Colburn, Eureka, 111. 51 years. 

516. Anna L. Colson, Plainfield, 111. 6 years. 

517. Martha (Crist) Kasbeer. Died January 30, 1891. 1 year. 

518. Carrie Crum, Lewiston. Idaho. 9 years. 

519. Laura L. Furman. Died at Normal, September 10, 1888. 

520. Carrie B. (Goode) Adams, Lincoln. Neb. 2 years. 

521. E. Margaret Hursey, Normal, 111. 

522. CynthaA. Rutledge, 1499 Washington Boulevard. Chicago. 5 years. 

523. Flora B. Smith, 657 West Main street, Decatur, 111. 9 years. 

524. Mary J. Watt. Died, . 7 years. 

525. Josepha H. E. Witte, Carlinville. 111. 4 years. 
526., .lacob S. Cline, 1494 Fulton street, Chicago. 1 year. 

527. Edwin S. Combs, Carthage, 111. Student at University of Michi- 

gan. 7 years. 

528. John W. Creekmur, 934 Marquette Building, Chicago. 8 years. 

529. John H. Gray, Professor of Political Economy, N. W. Univers- 

ity, F.vanston, 111. 5| years. 

530. George M. Holferty. Studying in Europe. 3 years. 

531. Joab R. Kasbeer, Denver, Col. 4 years. 

532. Thomas M. Kilbride. Principal Ward School, Springfield, 111. 

(> years. 

533. William J. Rowson, Harvard, 111. 8 years. 

5:U. Adna T. Smith, Eureka, 111. Teacher in Eureka College. 3 years. 

535. Almeron W. Smith, Collegiate Institute, Salt Lake City. 6 years. 

536. Amos Wat kins. ( lergyman, Los Animas, Col. 2 years. 



Illinois State Normal University. 123 

Class of 1888. 

537. Maude I. Abbott, 816 East Douglas street, Blooming-ton, 111. 5 

years. 

538. Louise L. (Babcock) Arenschield, Eldon, Iowa. 3 years. 

539. M. Sophie Barry, Galena, 111. 2 years. 

540. Mary E. Corson, Danville, 111. 8 years. 

541. Sarah G. (Corson) Laird, Lanark, 111. 5 years. 

542. Ida E. (Crouch) Hazlett, Rico, Col. 4* years. 

543. Ida L. Elkins, Evanston, 111. 8 years. 

544. Ella M. (Ferris) Kitfield, Denver, Col., cor. Sixteenth and Clark- 

son. 2 years. 

545. Florence M. (Gaston) Smith, Normal, 111. 2 years. 

546. Hattie M. (Hedges) Patton, Gold Hill, Col. 2 years. 

547. Nettie S. Hunter, West Denver High School, Denver, Col. 7 years. 

548. Hulda (Koester) Clark, 1251 Stout street, Denver, Col. 4 years. 

549. Emma (Lisk) Guthrie. Died October 4. 1891. 1 year. 

550. Lydia (Merrill) Tarbox, Mont Clare. 6 years. 

551. Emma H. Parker, Elmoville, 111. 7 years. 

552. Ellen Pveid, 918 John street, Seattle, Wash. 8 years. 

553. Anna M. (Smith) Brown. Divernon, 111. 5 years. 

554. Carrie V. (Smith) Stebbins. Salt Lake City. 5 years. 

555. Jessie E. (Sumner) McReynolds, Virginia. 111. 4 }^ears. 

556. Mina M. Watson, 935 Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 8 years. 

557. Fred Barton, Pleasant Hill, 111. 5 years. 

558. Howard S. Brode. Student in University of Chicago. 5 years. 

559. William N. Brown, Des Moines, la. 4 years. 

560. Hanan McCarrel, Principal of Schools, Griggsville, 111. 8 years. 

561. Anthony Middleton, Principal of Schools, Chenoa, 111. 7 years. 

562. William Minier, Superintendent of Schools, Pana, 111. 8 years. 

563. William J. Morrison. Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pa. 6 

years. 

564. Elijah Needham, Ashland, 111. Principal of Schools. 8 years. 

565. Edmond C. Parker, Rochelle,. 111. 3 years. 

566. Charles F. Philbrook. Principal Public Schools, Rochelle, 111. 

8 years. 

567. Francis M. Richardson, Principal of Schools, Fairbury, 111. 7^ 

years. 

568. Lewis Rhoton, Little Rock, Ark. Principal High School. 8 years. 

569. Edmund B. Smith. Principal Public Schools, Normal, 111. 8 years. 

570. James W. Tavenner. Superintendent of Schools, Chillicothe, 

111. 8 years. 

571. Washington Wilson, Chico, Cal. Head of Department of Educa- 

tion in State Normal School. 8 years. 



124 Annual Catalogue 

Class of 1889. 

572. M. Kate (Bigham) Brode, Chicago. 111. 4 years. 

573. Anna M. Brisbane. Died August, 1891. 2 years. 

574. Maggie H. (Brown) Aldrich, Keokuk, la. 5 years. 

575. Margaret (Burns) Shry, Porterville, Cal. 3 years. 

576. Luella M. Denman. Teacher of English, Illinois Wesleyan Uni- 

versity, Bloomington, 111. 4 years. 

577. Florence (Guthrie) Hutchings, San Bernardino, Cal. 7 years. 

578. Estella L. (Hurd) Adams, El Paso, 111. 4 years. 

579. Elizabeth K. (McElroy) Rishel, Rinconada, N.M. 7 years. 

580. Cora F. Philbrook, Normal, 111. 5 years. 

581. Sara L. (Saltzman) Rhea, 1212 North Oak street, Bloomington, 

111. 2 years. 

582. Minnie E. Wilson, Hing Hua, China, Missionary. H years. 

583. William Aldrich, Keokuk, Iowa. 6 years. 

584. Sherman Cass, Prin. Public Schools, Homer, 111. 7 years. 

585. Charles M. Fleming, Shelbyville, 111. 6 years. 

586. Enoch A. Fritter, Monticello, 111. Principal of High School. 7 

years. 

587. William J Galbraith. Teacher of Grammar and Reading, State 

Normal School, Whitewater, Wis. 3 years. 

588. Richard Heyward, Yorkville, 111. Principal of Schools. 6 years. 

589. Albert E. Jones, Sterling, 111. 7 years. 

590. George A. Weldon, Pontiac, 111. Principal of Schools. 6 years. 

591. Frank L. Young. Student in Harvard University, Cambridge, 

Mass. 

Class of 1890. 

592. Julia M. Case, Earlville, 111. 3^ years. 

593. Mary R. Cleveland, Normal, 111. 3 years. 

594. Alf aretta Fisher, Aledo, 111. 6 years. 

595. N. Lee (Foley) Luce, 308 Maple avenue, Oak Park, 111. 4 years. 

596. Minnie L. Gay, Southland, Ark. 6 years. 

597. Honor (Hubbard) Easton, Woodstock, 111. 3 years. 

598. Ilo.se W. Humphrey, Neenah, Wis. 5 years. 
5 ( .i9. Mattie H. Lischnewski, Chicago, 111. 

600. Alice J. Patterson, Fairbury, 111. 5£ years. 

601. ThirzaM. Pierce, 2006 Sherman avenue, Evanston, 111. 3 years. 

602. Cora M. Porterfield, Chicago. Student in University of Chicago. 

5 years. 

603. Margaret C. Power, Pontiac, 111. 6years. 

604. A. Laurie (Renshaw) Frazeur, Chicago, 111. 1 year. 

605. Lavina E. Roberts, Pittsfield, III. Editor Peopled Advocate, 



Illinois State Normal School. 125 

606. Belle C. Robinson, Mont Clare, 111. 1^ years. 

607. Alice E. Smart, Scales Mound, 111. i year. 

608. Maggie L. Smith. Student at Wesleyan University. Normal, 

111. 5 years. 

609. Cora E. (Snider) Irwin, Normal, 111. 

610. Maud Valentine, Normal, 111. Assistant Training - Teacher, State 

Normal School. 

611. Nellie M. Wheeler. Died March 25, 1891. 

612. Mary Lou Whitney, Peoria, 111. 5 years. 

613. Ida Woods, 92 Brompton Road, London, England. 5 years. 

614. Emily C. Zigler, Penrose, 111. 6 years. 

615. Rudolph H. H. Blome, Paxton, 111. Principal of Rice Collegiate 

Institute. 5| years. 

616. Lyman W. Childs, 55 Archwood avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. Paid 

tuition since graduation. 1 year. 

617. Louis B. Easton, Prin. Public School, Woodstock, 111. 6 years. 

618. EmilR. Greabeiel, Elm Creek, Neb. 3 years. 

619. John W. Hall, Buffalo, N. Y. Teacher in School of Pedagogy. 3 

years. 

620. Lincoln E. Harris, Colorado Springs, Col. 5 years. 

621. Dudley G. Hays, Engiewood, 111. Instructor in Science in High 

School. 6 years. 

622. Frank E. King. Student in University of Illinois. 2 years. 

623. Charles V. McReynolds, Virginia, 111. Principal Public Schools. 

6 years. 

624. Harry C Metcalf . Student in Germany. 

625. Charles A. Perkins, Normal, 111. 3 years. 

626. K. Girard Whittaker, East St. Louis, 111. 5 years. 

627. Albert N. Young, Rutland, 111. Principal Public Schools. 5 

years. 

Class of 1891. 

628. Trophie J. (Amerman) Snyder, Flora, 111. 2£ years. 

629. Clara B. Bishop, Piper City, 111. 2 years. 

630. Kate E. Conover, Peculiar, Mo. 4 years. 

631. Bessie (Curtis) Young, Rutland, 111. 5 years. 

632. Carrie E. Flinn, Pana, 111. 4 years. 

633. Rebecca A. Foley, Rushville, 111. 4 years. 

634. Emma Hill, West Point, Miss. 5 years. 

635. Grace Hite, 424 N. 9th street, East St. Louis, 111. 5 years. 

636. Anna M. Kienzle, Bloomington, 111. 2 years. 

637. Bessie A. McCann, 206 Sherman street. Joliet, 111. 3 years 

638. Sara A. McGill, Austin, 111. 4 years. 

639. Edna Mettler, Oconto, Wis. 2 years. 



12(i Annual Catalogue 

640. Alice L. Raymond, Vacaville, Cal. 2 years. 

641. Maud M. Root, Hinsdale, 111. 5 years. 

642. Katherine G. (Spear) Hadfield, Milwaukee, Wis. 2 years. 

643. Emma (Spurgeon) Dixon, Rosevilie, 111. '2 years. 

644. Lillian Thompson, Warrensburg, 111. 3 years. 

645. Lucy E. Wallace, 109 Bowen place, Joliet, 111. Teacher in Chi- 

cago Schools. 4 years. 

646. Charles x\. Armstrong - , Lincoln, 111. 5 years. 

647. John H. Cox, Brown University, Providence, R. I. 5 years, 

648. William S. Dewhirst, office Auditor for War Department, Wash- 

ington, D. C. 

649. Philip H. Erbes, 627 Davis avenue, Chicago. 

650. James J. Ferguson, Onasga. 111. Teacher of Pedagogy, Grand 

Prairie Seminar}-. 5 years. 

651. Casper G. Hanawalt. 3 years. 

652. William D. Hawk, Colfax, III. 4 years. 

653. Grant Karr. Student at Jena, Germany. 4 years. 

654. William H. Kring, Kappa, 111. 

655. Bertrand D. Parker, Jr. Principal of High School, Rockford, 111. 

3 years. 

656. James B. Pollock, Ann Arbor, Mich. Assistant in Botany, 'U. of M. 

2 years. 

657. George W. Reid,Wenona, 111. Principal Public Schools. 5 years. 

658. James J. Sheppard, Decatur, 111. Principal of High School. 2 

years. 

659. ( Jharles C. Wilson, 285 Barrow street, Jersey City, N. J. 2 years. 

Class of 1892. 

660. Ella M. Andrew, 350 E. Chicago avenue, Chicago, 111. 4 years. 

661. Ruth C. Bailer, Bloomington, 111. 4 years. 

662. Alma (Boyer) Hatch, Oak Park, 111. 

663. Eliza Breuer, Sandwich, 111. 3 years. 

664. Caroline M. Butterfield, Terre Haute, Ind. 1 year. 

665. Florence. J. Clark, DeKalb, 111. 4 years. 

WO. Fllen R. (Connett) Detweiler, 1314 S. 27th street, Omaha, Neb. 3 

years. 

•j<i7. Bella L. Cook, 1507 Oakdale avenue, Chicago, 111. 4 }^ears. 

• ids. Ktt a Fordyce, Monmouth, 111. 4 years. 

669. Belinda E. (Garrison) Miller, Jerseyville, 111. 2 years. 

670. Battie J. Gaston, Chicago, 111. 2 years. 

671. Cora (Laign) Rigby, Oak Park, 111. 2 years. 

672. Katherine E. McGorray, 877 S.Webster street, Decatur, ill. 4 

years. 



Illinois State Normal University. 127 

673. Mary E. McGinnis, Saybrook, 111. 3 years. 

674. Mary Neff, Tracy, Minn. 4 years. 

675. Jessie Peasley, Bloomington, 111. 4 years. 

676. Phebe R. Vail, Lone Tree, 111. 21 years. 

677. Minnie Whitham, Oak Park, 111. 4 years. 

678. James E. Ament, Superintendent of Public Schools, Rock Island, 

111. 3 years. 

679. Frank G. Blair. Student in Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, 

Pa. 3 years. 

680. Edwin L. Boyer. Assistant High School, Blooming-ton, 111. 4 

years. 

681. R. Olin Butterfield. Professor of Biology, State Normal School, 

Terre Haute, Ind. 2 years. 

682. Elmer W. Cavins. Assistant State Normal University, Normal, 

111. 4 years. 

683. Gary R. Colburn. Principal Broadway High School, West Supe- 

rior, Wis. 2 years. 

684. Lewis W. Colwell. Principal Lihne School, 1661 N. Troy street, 

(Station G), Chicago, 111. 2 years. 

685. S. A. D. Faris. Principal of Public Schools, Perry, 111. 4 years. 

686. William C. Fulton, Roanoke, 111. 1 year. 

687. G. Charles Griffiths, Principal of Grammar School, Austin, 111. 4 

years. 

688. Luther A. Hatch, Principal Ward School, Oak Park. 111. 4 years. 

689. Charles C. Herren, Bristol, 111. 3 years. 

690. Morris E. Killam, Tower Hill, 111. 3 years. 

691. Mack M. Lane, Hegewisch, 111. Principal Henry Clay School, 

Chicago. 4 years. 

692. John B. Moulton, Henson Park, 111. 3 years. 

693. Swen F. Parson. DeKalb, 111. 2 years. 

694. Royal W. Sanders, Bloomington, 111. 3 years. 

695. William J. Sutherland. Principal Public Schools, Oregon, 111. 4 

years. 

696. Benjamin F. Vaughan. Decatur, Ind. 2 years. 

697. Charles F. Watt. 3 years. 

Class of 1893. 

698. Jennie Bailey, Molirie, 111. 3 years. 

699. Mae Cook, Marinette, Wis. 1| years. 

700. Jessie H. Cunningham, Richmond, Ind. 3 years. 

701. Nettie T. Dahl, Granville, 111. 3 years. 

702. Jude E. Davis, Rushville, 111. 2 years. 

703. Margretta Hart, May wood. Beauview School, Chicago. 3 years. 



128 Annual Catalogue 

704. Carrie P. Herndon, Morgan Park, 3 years. 

705. Lizzie I. Hilton, Maywood, 111. .3 years. 

706. Georgia J. Kimball, 111 N. Guilford street, Huntington, Ind. 3 

years. 

707. Marguerite (McElroy) Westbrook, Paxton, 111. 2 years. 

708. Sarah C. Parker, Stewart, 111. 2 years. 

709. Edith S. Patten. Principal Public Schools, Cortland, 111. 3 years. 

710. Mary Weber, LaSalle. 3 years. 

711. Minnie S. Whitaker, Charleston, 111. 1 year. 

712. Kate White, Principal of Schools, Brocton, 111. 3 years. 

713. Mary L.Wilcox, 723 North Third street, Springfield, 111. 1J years. 

714. Jennie R. Wright, Savanna, 111. 3 years. 

715. Archibald J. Alcorn. Principal Public Schools, Washburn, 111. 

3 years. 

716. Edward C. Backer, Ravenswood School, Chicago. 3 years. 

717. Herman J. Backer, Rose Hill School, Chicago. 3 years. 

718. Joseph A. Dixon, Principal Public Schools, Roseville, 111. 3 years. 

719. William B. Elliott, Altona, 111. 3 years. 

720. George H. Gaston. Student University of Illinois. 1 year. 

721. William L. Goble. Principal Public Schools, Kansas, 111. 2 years. 

722. Walter S. Goode. Principal Public Schools, Palestine, 111. 3 

years. 

723. Paul E. Grabow. Principal Public Schools, Malta, 111. 3 years. 

724. James A. Hodge. Principal Public Schools, Maroa, 111. 2 years. 

725. Warren Jones. Principal Public Schools, Lima, 111. 3 years. 

726. John P. Merker. Assistant in High School. Belleville, 111. 

3 years. 

727. John D. Murphy. Student Danville Theological Seminary, Dan- 

ville, Ky. Paid tuition in full. 

728. William S. Pierce. Teacher of Science in High School, Aurora, 

111. 3 years. 

729. William D. Scott. Principal Public Schools, Leland, 111. 3 years. 

730. Herbert C. Waddle. Principal Public Schools, Vinton, Iowa. 3 

year. 

731. William S. Wallace. Principal Public Schools, Henry, 111. 3 

years. 

732. Henry D. Willard, 726 West Seventh street, Los Angeles, Cal. 3 

years. 

Class of 1894. 

73.'5. Isabella Anderson, McLean, 111. 2 years. 

734. Cora Belle (Barney) Bellows, 2147 Sherman avenue, Evanstou, 
111. 1 year. 



Illinois State Normal University. 129 

735. Willie Belle Butler, Oak Park, 111. 2 years. 

736. Augusta Elizabeth Corbin, Elwood, 111. 6 months. 

737. Annie Ethelyn Gaylord, Plymouth, 111. 2 years. 

738. Eleanor Hampton, Austin, 111. 2 years. 

739. Eva Belle Houser, Atlanta, 111. 2 years. 

740. Mary Josephine McCafferty, Rankin, 111. 2 years. 

741. Lillian Samantha Nelson, Champaign, 111. 2 years. 

742. Evelyn Peltier, Chicago. 2 years. 

743. Pauline Marie Rosalie Schneider, Clintonville, Wis. 2 years. 

744. May Slocum, Evanston, 111. 2 years. 

745. Lida Jane Smith, Lexington, 111. 2 years. 

746. Rosa Waugh, Dixon, 111. 2 years. 

747. Frederic Delos Barber, Gardner, 111. 2 years. 

748. Herbert Bassett, Principal East Side School, El Paso, 111. 2 

years. 

749. Joseph Grant Brown. Assistant in Science Department State 

Normal School, Normal, 111. 2 years. 

750. Charles Dayton Coley, Principal Public School, Oneida, 111. 2 

years. 

751. Thomas Higdon Gentle, Student in Jena, Germany. 

752. Edward Clement Graybill, De Land, 111. Principal of Public 

Schools. 2 years. 

753. Albert Smith Hanna, Student in Harvard University. 

754. John Alexander Hull Keith, Principal Grammar Department 

Practice School, Normal, 111. 2 years. 

755. Wilson Klinger, Student in Jena, Germany. 

756. Mason E. Knapp, Principal Public Schools, Braidwood, 111. 2 

years. 

757. Benjamin Clay Moore, Principal Public Schools, Mackinaw, 111. 

2 years. 

758. Frederick Gilgert Mutterer, Principal High School, Galena, 111. 

2 years. 

759. Curtis Finley Pike, Student in U. of I., Champaign. 1 year. 

760. Jacob W. Rausch, Principal Public School, Mazon, 111. 2 years. 

761. William Thomas Skinner, Principal Public School, McLean, 111. 

2 years. 

762. Ernest Algier Thornhill, Assistant in Practice School, Normal, 

111. 2 years. 

763. William Wesley White, Apple River, 111. 2 years. 

Class of 1895. 

764. Fannie Bailer, Normal, 111. 

765. Mabel Winslow Barrett, Yorkville, 111. 1 year. 

766. Mary Bertha Boulter, Evanston, 111. 1 year. 



130 Annual ('dialogue 

767. Martha Alice Grattan, West Superior, Wis. 1 year. 

768. Phebe Hammond, Dixon, 111. 1 year. 

769. Margaret Hanna, Coal Valley, 111. 1 year. 

770. Mary Emma Morgan, Keithsburg. 111. J year. 

771. Nellie Maria Phillips. Assistant in Practice School, Normal, 111. 

1 year. 

772. Louemma Raber, Freeport. 111. 1 year. 

773. Anna Barbara Schulte, Dixon, 111. 1 year. 

774. Agnes Marion Smith, Deer Creek, 111. 1 year. 

775. Laura Mabel Thompson, Bartlett, 111. 

776. William Ross Cothern, Keithsburg, 111. 1 year. 

777. Frederick George Curtis, Principal Public Schools, Dalton Sta- 

tion, 111. 1 year. 

778. Henry Hugh Edmunds, Principal Public Schools, Sullivan, 111. 

1 year. 

779. John William Fisher, Principal High School, Peru, 111. 1 year. 

780. William E. Hedges. Principal Public Schools, Macon, 111. 1 year 

781. Edward Richard Hendricks, Principal Public Schools. Leland. 

111. 1 year. 

782. Thomas Arthur Hillyer, Principal High School, Shelbyville, 111. 

1 year. 

783. Samuel B. Hursh, Principal Ward School, Sterling, 111. 1 year. 

784. Joseph McNichols Hutchinson, Principal Public Schools, Wyom- 

ing, 111. 1 year. 

785. Granville Bond Jeffers. Principal Ward School, Bloomington, 111. 

1 year. 

786. Frank Lindley, Loda, 111. 1 year. 

787. Justin Jay Love, Principal Public Schools, Kane, 111. 1 year. 

788. George Edward Marker, Principal High School, Effingham, 111, 

1 year. 

789. Andrew Hutton Melville, Principal Public Schools, Riverdale. 

111. 1 year. 

790. Chessley Justin Posey, Principal Public Schools, Minier, 111. 1 

year. 

791. Reuben Tiffany, Principal Public Schools, Neoga, 111. 1 year. 

792. Clyde Renal Travis, Principal High School, Greenfield, 111. 1 year. 

793. Thomas Brinton Wortman, Principal Public Schools, Rosemond % 

111. 1 year. 



Illinois State Normal University. ■ 131 



High School Alumni. 



(These persons, except those who graduate also from the Normal Department- 
paid their tuition in full, and are undt-r no obligation to teach. > 

Class of 1865. 

1. Gertrude (Case) Young, Dayton, O. Taught 9 years. 

2. Clara V. (Pell) Fyffe, Normal, 111. 

3. Charles L. Capen, Bloomington, 111. Lawyer. 

4. Howard C. Crist. Died 1883. 

5. Hosea Howard, St. Louis, Mo. Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific Ry. 

6. William McCambridge, Blooming-ton, 111. Editor Pantograph. 

7. Robert McCart, ('ripple Creek, Colo. Lawyer. 

Class of 1868. 

8. Annie (Edwards) Dougherty, Peoria, 111. Taught H years. 

9. R. Arthur Edwards. See No. 137. 

Class of 1869. 

10. Gratiot Washburn. Died 1886. 

Class of 1870. 

11. Almira A. Bacon. 

12. Nellie (Galusha) Smith, Peoria, 111. Taught 1 year. 

13. William Burry, Chicago. Lawyer. 

14. William Duff Haynie, Chicago, Rookery Bldg. Lawyer. 

15. William H. Smith, Peoria, 111. Taught 4 years. County Super- 

intendent 6| years. 

Class of 1 87 1. 

16. Alice C. Chase, Chicago. With Inter-Ocean. 

Class of 1872. 

17. Chalmers Rayburn, Burns, Kas. Taught 6 years. 

18. Newton B. Reed, Woonsocket, South Dakota. 

Class of 1873. 

19. M. Louise Abraham, Chicago. Taught 9 years. 

20. Edmund J. James. Professor of Political Economy, University of 

Chicago. Taught 15 years. 

21. J. Dickey Templeton, Bloomington, 111. First National Bank. 



132 Annual Catalogue 

Class of 1874. 

22. Adele (Cook) Sample, Paxton, 111. 

23. 1. Eddy Brown. See No. 232. 

Class of 1875. 

24. Ann S. Wheaton, San Diego, Cal. Taught 11 years. 

25. Nicholas T. Edwards, Los Angeles, Cal. Clergyman. Taught 1 

year. 

26. Frank W. Gove, Denver. Col. Taught 2 years. 

27. Emrick B. Hewitt. Died March, 1879. 

Class of 1876. 

28. J. Calvin Hanna. See No. 272. 

29. Arabella D. Loer, Mexico, Mo. 

30. Charles A. McMurry, Supervisor of Practice, State Normal School, 

Normal, 111. Taught 12 years. 

Class of 1877. 

31. Sarah (Coolidge) Hoblit, Bloomington, 111. 

32. Jennie Kingsley. Died in Denver, November, 1879. Taught 2 

years. 

33. Sabina F. (Mills) Dickey, Boulder Creek, Cal. Taught 8 years. 

34. Laura Sudduth, Normal, 111. 

35. Frank A. Blandin, Rutland, 111. 

36. George A. Franklin, Faribault, Minn. Superintendent Public 

Schools. Taught 14 years. 

37. Theodore T. Hewitt, Freeport, 111. Banker. 

Class of 1878. 

38. Rachel M. (Fell) Treakle, Morrisonville, Mo. Taught 2 years. 

39. Frances Preston. See No. 308. 

40. Anna (Sudduth) Hopper, Galesburg, 111. 

41. Willis C. Glidden. See No. 317. 

42. Dorus C. Hatch, Georgetown, Col. Superintendent Public Schools. 

Taught 5£ years. 

43. C. G. Laybourn. See No. 318. 

44. Theodore W. Peers, Topeka, Kas. Physician. Taught 1 year. 

Class of 1879. 

45. Fannie C. Fell, Normal, 111. Taught 5 years. 

46. Hattie (Follette) McNamar, Woodstock, 111. 
17. Mary (Sudduth) McCormick, Normal, 111. 



Illinois State Normal University. 133 

48. Silas Y. Gillan. See No. 334. 

49. Frank B. Harcourt. See No. 296. 

50. Nelson K. McCormick, Normal, 111. Physician. 

51. Frank McMurry. Dean School of Pedagogy, Buffalo,' N. Y. 

Taught 9 years. 

52. Oscar McMurry, 100 Washington street, Chicago, 111. Architect. 

Taught 4 years. 

53. Thomas Williams, Lincolnville, Kan. 

Class of 1880. 

54. Helen M. (Baxter) Brakefield. See No. 338. 

55. May (Hewett) Reeder. See No. 340. 

56. Alice (McCormick) Trowbridge. See No. 407. 

57. Frances Ohr, St. Paul, Minn. 520 Cedar street. Taught 11 years. 

58. Frank Lufkin, City of Mexico. 

59. Herbert McNulta, Chicago, 111. 

60. George K. Smith, St. Louis, Mo. 

Class of 1 88 1. 

61. Elmer E. Brown. See No. 366. 

62. John H. Tear. See No. 372. 

Class of 1882. 

63. B. Bayliss Beecher, Memphis, Tenn. 

Class of 1883. 

64. Mary L. (Beecher) Ensley, Memphis, Tenn. 

65. Flora (Lewis) Rosenberry. See No. 406. 

66. Dollie A. (McGowan) Gharst, Riverside, Cal. Taught 6 years. 

67. Ida M. Porter. See No. 4.2. 

68. Lillie M. (Walker) Smith, Homer, 111. Taught 1 year. 

69. William A. Crawford, 254 Hennepin avenue, Minneapolis, Minn. 

70. Isaac B. Hammerj, Panola, 111. Taught 2 years. 

71. W. Herbert Higby, Streator, 111. 

72. Edward F. Parr, Chicago, 111., 171 LaSalle street. 

73. Frank H. Thorp. Teacher Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. 

3 years. 

Class of 1884. 

74. Edward Aldrich. See No. 447. 

75. Leader Messick. See No. 452. 

Class of 1885. 

76. Murray M. Morrison. See No. 389. 

77. M. Joice Adams. See No. 458. 



134 Annual Catalogw 

78. Robert H. Elder, New York City, 50 Irving place. 

79. Harry M. Loehr, Blooming-ton, 111. 

Class of 1 886. 

80. Jessie M. Dillon, Normal, 111. 3% years. 

81. Saidee J. Gray. See No. 491. 

82. Mary L. Kimball. See No. 493. 

83. Cora M. Rowell, Fresno, Cal. 5 years. 

84. Olive Sattley. See No. 499. 

fo. May (Shinn) Giddings. See No. 500. 

86. Juliet A. (Wallace) Hitt. See No. 502. 

87. Lee O'Neil Browne, Lawyer, Ottawa, 111. 

88. Jesse Hammers. Died December 2. 1890. 

89. Fred E. Jenkins, Principal Preparatory Department Shattuck 

School, Faribault, Minn. Taught 9 years. 

90. Harrie H. Town, Banker, Earlville, 111. 

Class of 1887. 

91. Lucy Coolidge, Decatur. 111. Teacher in High School. 4% years. 

92. Martha (Crist) Kasbeer. See No. 517. 

93. Bertha M. (Glidden) Bradt. De Kalb, 111. 

94. Alice F. (Tryner) Evans. Bloomington, 111. 

95. Joab A. Bohrer, Bloomington, 111. 4 years. 

96. Alexander M. Cunningham. Missionary, Pekin, China. 

97. J. Robert Effinger, Jr., Professor of French of U. of M., Ann 

Arbor, Mich. Taught 5 years. 

98. Walter H. Green. Orleans, Neb. 

99. Charles B. Harrison, Bloomington, 111. 

100. Joab R. Kasbeer. See No. 531. 

101. George M. Peairs. Physician, Morris, 111. Taught 1 year. 

102. Harry J. Peairs, Allegheny City, Pa. Taught 1 year. 

103. Leonard M. Prince. Died November 1, 1895. 

104. William F. Ryburn, Milford. 111. 

105. John A. Scott, Evanston. 111. Instructor in Greek. Taught 4 

years. 

Class of 1888. 

106. M. Sophie Barry. See No. 539. 

107. Laura McCurdy, Bloomington 111. 

108. Josie L. (Roberts) Bent, Oglesby, 111. Taught 3 years. 

109. Clarence C. Carroll, Bloomington, 111. 

110. Dexter W. Kales, M. I).. 915 L. St. N. W., Washington. 1). ( '. 

111. Hanan McCarrell. See No. 560. 

112. Walter G. Porter. Normal, Ml. 



Illinois State Normal University. 135 

Class of 1889. 

113. Luella M. Denman. See No. 570. 

114. Sarah L. (Saltsman) Rhea. See No. 581. 

115. Lemuel P. Buck, Moawequa, 111. 

116. Clifford H. Coolidge, Blooming-ton. 111. 

117. Francis G. Dullam, Minneapolis, Minn. 

118. Lucian H. Gilmore. Professor, Throop Polytechnic Institute, 

Pasadena, Cal. 

119. Theodore L. Harley. Principal of High School. Olney, 111. 2 

3^ears. 

120. Joseph Manley. Teacher in Marietta College. Ohio. Taught 3 

years. 

121. Edmund B. McCormick. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

122. Brainard L. Spence, Oakland, Cal. 

123. Harry Weber, Washing-ton, D. C. 

Class of 1890. 

124. [va M. Durham, Deaconess Home, 2978 Main street, Buffalo. N.Y. 

3 years. 

125. Annie L. Glidden, Chicag-o. 2 years. 

126. Clara B. James, Philadelphia, Pa. Taug-ht 2 years. 

127. Cora M. Porteriield. See No. 602. 

128. May Skinner, Normal, 111. 

129. Kittie D. (Wrig-ht) Stillhammer, Bloomington, 111. 

130. Jesse L. Prazeur, Chicago. 2 years. 

131. Prank E. King;. See No. 622. 

132. Silas Ropp, Irving Park, 111. 

133. James F. Wilson, Mt. Palatine, 111. Taught 2 years. 

Class of 1 89 1. 

134. Mellie E. Bishop. Student in Swarthmore Colleg-e, Swarthmore. 

Pa. Taught 3 years. 

135. Grace Cheney, Blooming-ton, HI. 

136. Ag-nes S. Cook, Normal, 111. Student in University of Chicago. 

137. Rachel Crothers, Blooming-ton, 111. 

138. Edna Mettler. See No. 639. 

139. Louise M. Vickroy, 808 Holmes street, Los Ang-eles, Cal. 

140. Georg-e P. Burns. Williamsville, 111. Taught 5 years. 

141. Cary R. Colburn. Student in Harvard University. Taug-ht 1 year. 

142. Philip H. Erbes. See No. 649. 

143. Charles W. Mills. Assistant in High School, Decatur. 111. Taught 

1 year. 

144. William B. Moulton. Menlo Park. Cal. 



186 Annual Catalogue 

145. Bertrand D. Parker. See No. 655. 

146. James B. Pollock. See No. 656. 

147. James J. Sheppard. See No. 658. 

148. Charles C. Wilson. See No. 659. 

Class of 1892. 

149. Grace E. Chandler, Galena, 111. 

150. Lura M. Eyestone, Normal, 111. Taught 3 years. 

151. Enid (Gibson) Hillegas, 2536 Wabash avenue, Chicago. Taught 

i year. 

152. Anna Gilbourne, Cabery, 111. Taught Sh years. 

153. Asenath Grier, Lexington, 111. Student in University of Chi- 

cago. Taught 3 years. 

154. Metta Bailing, Bloomington, 111. 

155. Walter H. Baird, Normal, 111. Taught 2 years. 

156. Arthur Bassett, Normal, 111. 

157. George W. Bishop, Champaign, 111. Student in University of 

Illinois. Taught 2 years. 

158. Edgar Blackburn, Helena, Mont. 

159. John B. Cleveland, Normal, 111. Taught 2| years. 

160. Herbert S. Hicks. Leland Stanford University. 

161. Samuel Holder, Bloomington, 111. 

162. Frank E. King. See No. 622. 

163. WeldonE. Porter, Normal, 111. 

164. George W. Riley. University of Pennsylvania. 

165. Walter D. Scott. Northwestern University. 

Class of 1893. 

166. Grace D. Aldrich, Normal, 111. 

167. Nellie J. Benson, Bloomington, 111. 

168. Sarah H. Clark, Assistant in High School, Bloomington, 111. 2 

years. 

169. Katie P. Evans, Normal, 111. Taught 1 year. 

170. Junia M. Foster, Longmont, Col. 

171. Mrs. Jesse Frazeur, Chicago, 111. Taught 1 year. 

172. Nellie I. Koifoid. University of Illinois, Champaign, 111. 

173. L. May (Leaton) Jlodman, Normal, 111. Taught 3 years. 

174. Alice Patten, Cortland. 111. 

175. Bertha Rutledge, Umpire, 111. 

176. Grace a Sealey, Normal, 111. 

177. Ethel L. Tryner, Bloomington, III. 

17*. William II. Arbogast, University of Chicago, Chicago. 
179. James II. Forrester, Taylorville, [11. 



Illinois State Normal University. 137 

180. J. Philip Merker. See No. 726. 

181. Cuthbert F. Parker, Holyoke, Colo. 

182. Thomas L. Pollock, Bloomington; 111. 

183. Elmer I. Rowell, University of California. 

184. Frank H. Wescott, University of Chicago, Chicago. Taught 1 

year. 

Class of 1894. 

185. Effie Allspaugh, Normal, III. 

186. Mrs. R. O. Butterfield. See No. 661. 

187. Charlotte B. Capen, Bloomington, 111. Student in U. of C. 

188. Stella R. Eldred, Gardner, 111. 

189. Neffa B. Emerson, Bloomington, 111. 

190. Florence B. Evans, Bloomington, III. 

191. Nellie F. Goodwin, Normal, 111. 

192. Ruth E. Moore, Bloomington, 111. Student of U. of C. 

193. H. L. Mabel Porterfield, Normal, III. Student of U. of C. See 

No. 602. 

194. Eunice F. Sater, Jacksonville, 111. 

195. Rosa Waugh. See No. 746. 

196. Frank P. Bachman. Student inU. of C. 

197. Burl P. Baker, Principal High School, Vandalia, III. 2 years. 

198. G. Gordon Burnside, Carlyle, 111. 2 years. 

199. Alfred C. LeSourd, Topeka, 111. 1 year. 

200. Bert H. McCann, Normal, 111. 

201. Harry C. McCart, Fort Worth, Texas. 

202. Charles G. Miller, Moweaqua, 111. 

203. Frederick G. Mutterer. See No. 758. 

204. Ora M. Rhodes. Student in U. of I. 

235. Harvey S. Smith, Principal of Public Schools, Tonica. 2 years. 

206. Harry R. Spickerman, Bloomington, 111. Student Medical Col- 

lege, Chicago. 

207. J. William Taylor, Williamsville, 111. 

208. Daniel Thompson, Randolph, 111. 

209. Theodore Thompson, Prairie Home, 111. 

Class of 1895. 

210. Pearl L. Ballard, Normal, 111. 

211. Blanche C. Bailer, Bloomington, 111. 

212. Jessie J. Bullock, Eureka, III. 1 year. 

213. May M. Cavan, Normal, 111. 

214. Ruah Coen, Normal, 111. 

215. Catherine L. Cowles, Bloomington, 111. 
—10 



138 Annual Catalogue 

216. Emma Fry, Normal. 111. 

217. Harriett B. Fyffe, Normal, 111. 

218. Daisy Garver, Bloomington, 111. 

219. Lou R. Hart, Gardner, 111. 

220. Eleanor Keady, Normal, 111. 

221. Sallie R. Marshall, Normal, 111. 

222. Flora (Thompson) Manchester, Normal, 111. 

223. James D., Allen, Bloomington, 111. 

224. Fred R. Baker, Blooming-ton, 111. Student Williams Collego. 

225. Charles M. Barton, Principal Public Schools, Chrisman. 111. 

Taught 1 year. 

226. Claude Briggs, Minier, III. Taught }{ year. 

227. John L. Cook, Normal, 111. 

228. Roy H. Dillon, Normal, III. Student U. of I. 

229. John T. Elliff, Minier, 111. 

230. George K. Foster, Normal, 111. 

231. William T. Kirk, Bloomington, III. 

232. Ferdinand C. McCormick, Normal. 111. Student Medical College? 

Chicago. 

233. Fred R. McMurry, Normal, 111. 

234. Fred W. Parker, Macomb, III. Student Dental College, Chicago. 

235. Ralph W. Parker, Macomb, 111. Student Dental College, Chiacgo. 

236. Thomas W. Tipton, Student Wesleyan Law School, Normal, 111. 












Illinois 
State Normal University 

NORMAL 



1896=7 



Annual Catalogue 

And Course of Study 



of 



The Illinois 
State Normal University 



Normal, Illinois 



Fortieth Year 



For the Academic Year Ending June 24 



[897 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 

OF THE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 



Hon. WILLIAM H. GREEN, Cairo 

PRESIDENT 

Hon. S. M. INGLIS, Springfield 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBER AND SECRETARY 



ENOCH A. GASTMAN, Esq., Decatur 

CHARLES L. CAPEN, Esq., Bloomington 
EDWARD DOOCY, Esq., Pittsfield 

E. R. E. KIMEROUGH,Esq., Danville 
MATTHEW P. BRADY, Esq., Chicago 
MRS. ELLA F. YOUNG, Chicago 

PELEG R. WALKER, Esq., Rockford 
M. E. PLAIN, Esq., Aurora 

FORREST F. COOK, Esq , Galesburg 
CHARLES I. PARKER, Esq., Chicago 

WILLIAM H. FITZGERALD, Esq., Chicago 
JACO i A. BAILY, Esq., Macomb 

CHARLES S. THORNTON, Esq , Chicago 



F. D. MARQUIS, Esq., Bloomington 

TREASURER 



c 




FACULTY 



JOHN W. COOK, A.M.. LL.D., President, 
Professor of Mental Science and Didactics. 

henry Mccormick, a.m., ph.d., vice-president, 

Professor of History and Geography. 

BUEL P. COLTON. A.M., 
Professor of Natural Sciences. 

DAVID FELMLEY, A.B., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

C. C. VAN LIEW, PH.D., 
Supervisor of Practice. 

O. L. MANCHESTER. A.M. 
Professor of Ancient and Modern Languages. 

LOUIS H. GALBREATH. B.L.. 

Assistant in Mental Science and Didactics. 

J. ROSE COLBY, PH.D., Preceptress, 
And Professor of Literature. 

MARY HARTMANN, A.M., 
Assistant in Mathematics. 

CLARISSA E. ELA. 
Teacher of Drawing. 

EVA WILKINS, 
Assistant in History and Geography. 

AMELIA F. LUCAS. 
Assistant in Reading and Teacher of Gymnastics. 

ELIZABETH MAVITY, 
Teacher of Grammar. 

JOSEPH G. BROWN, 
Assistant in Natural Sciences. 

J. IRVING READ, A.B.. 

Assistant in Ancient Languages. 

ANDREW H. MELVILLE, 
Principal of Grammar School. 

LIDA B. McMURRY, 
Assistant Training Teacher, Primary Grades. 

MAUD VALENTINE, 
Assistant Training Teacher, Intermediate Grades. 

ANNE A. STANLEY, • 
Assistant Training Teacher, Grammar Grades. 

CHESTER M. ECHOLS, 
Principal Second Intermediate. 

CHARLES H. ALLEN, 
Principal First Intermediate. 

ANNA KING, 
Principal Second Primary. 

JESSIE M. DILLON, 
Principal First Primary. 

CHARLES T. BOWMAN. 
Teacher Of Penmanship and Orthography. 

ANGE. V. MILNER, 
Librarian. 



Illlinoie State IRormal IDlntvereit^- 



Early History. 

HE Illinois State Normal University was established by act of 
the Legislature in 1857. The statute providing - for its location 
directed the governing board to solicit bids from competing 
points. Four cities were especially interested in securing it. Bloom- 
ington, McLean county, having offered the most favorable induce- 
ments, was selected as the location of the school. In October, 1857, 
the school began its sessions in rented rooms in the city of Blooming- 
ton. In September, 1860, it was removed to what was then known as 
North Bloomington, where a commodious building had been erected 
for its accommodation. The suburb of North Bloomington subse- 
quently became a separate town under the name of Normal. It has 
a population of about 4,000. It is a very desirable place of residence, 
having those qualities which are especially characteristic of school 
towns. The charter provides that intoxicating liquors shall never 
be sold within the limits of the town. There are no places of amuse- 
ment nor resorts that are in any respect objectionable. Electric 
cars connect Normal with Bloomington. 



Material Equipment. 

HE Normal School is comfortably housed in three buildings. The 
older contains three stories and a basement. It is about 100 by 
160 feet. It is built of brick and cost originally about $120,000. 
The basement contains dressing rooms for gentlemen, the chemical 
laboratory, a room used for clay work, another used for class 
exercises, and several store-rooms. On the first floor are the reading 
room and library, dressing rooms for ladies, office, a spacious room 
for drawing classes, and an assembly room and class rooms. On the 
second ti< or are the normal assembly room, with a seating capacity 
of 376, and eight class rooms each about 30 by 32. On the third floor 
are the museum, physical laboratory, office of the teacher of natural 
sciences, a large assembly hall, and the halls of the two literary 
societies. 



6 Annual Catalogue 

The Training School building- is a substantial brick structure of 
two stories and a basement. The basement contains play rooms and 
dry closets. On the first floor there are five school rooms, each having 
a seating - capacity of forty pupils. There is, beside, a smaller room 
that is used for recitation purposes. On the second floor there is a 
room for the grammar grade, with a seating capacity of 150. In addi- 
tion to this there are eight recitation rooms, each of which is suffi- 
ciently large to accommodate a class of twenty-five. The peculiar 
construction of this part of the building is to be accounted for by 
the fact that it became necessary to secure as many class rooms as 
possible in order to furnish opportunities to a large number of pupil 
teachers to engage in the practice work. 

The two buildings are heated from a commodious boiler house 
which is equipped with three large boilers. 

A third building, 100 by 125, is partially completed. It will con- 
tain an admirable gymnasium, bath rooms, a bowling alley, library 
room, and science rooms. The cut on the fourth cover page shows it 
as seen from the east. The gymnasium has been in use for several 
months. 

The chemical laboratory is well adapted to the needs of the school. 
The physical laboratory is well equipped with apparatus. The museum 
contains a large collection of specimens. The science department is 
furnished with an excellent lantern, and is also supplied with a steam 
pump for the compression of gases. 

There is a valuable reference library of over 9,000 bound volumes 
and 2,000 pamphlets. These books have been carefully selected, and 
there are scarcely any useless volumes in the collection, while new 
and desirable additions are being constantly made. 

Students are allowed the free use of the reading-room, and may 
draw out books without charge. The department is open seven hours 
and a half of every school day, and the librarian and an assistant are 
always in attendance. The privilege of access to the shelves has 
been established and the librarian gives instruction on the use of the 
library, in a set of informal talks. It is the aim of teachers and 
librarian to help the students to cultivate a familiarity with good 
literature and with the use of books, and to give them the best possi- 
ble assistance in doing their reference work. 

There are four excellent literary societies connected with the 
school. 

The campus contains fifty-six acres and affords abundant room for 
tennis and other out-door exercise, when the weather will permit. 



Illinois State Normal University. 7 

The Organization of the School. 

V^HE institution known as the Normal School contains two depart- 
f®) ments: First, the Normal Department; second, the Practice 
Department. 

No person is admitted to the Normal Department who does not 
sign a declaration of his intentions to teach. Applicants must be 16 
years of age if females, and 17 if males. No charge is made for tui- 
tion except to persons attending from other states, who do not expect 
to teach in Illinois. The membership of this department is usually 
from 550 to 650. Eighty-seven counties of Illinois have been represented 
this year. Fourteen teachers are employed in this department. 

The Practice Department is a necessary adjunct of the Normal 
Department. It consists of a school of ten grades, six of which are 
below the grammar grade. The aggregate attendance of the Train- 
ing School is usually about 300. Nine persons are employed in con- 
nection with this school. Four of these devote their time to directing 
the practice work of the Normal pupils; a fifth is principal of the 
Grammar Department. The others act as principals of the primary 
and intermediate rooms. No charge is made for pupils in the primary 
grades. The pupils in the intermediate department pay $15 a year, 
and those in the grammar grades, $25. 



Methods of Admission to the Normal School. 

All applicants for admission are required: 

1. To be, if males, not less than 17, and if females, not less than 16 
years of age; 

2. To produce a certificate of good moral character, signed by 
some responsible person; 

3. To sign a declaration of their intentions to devote themselves 
to school teaching in this State as follows: 

"I hereby solemnly declare, that my purpose in attending the 
Normal University is to fit myself for teaching in the schools of Illi- 
nois, and that I will carry out this pledge in good faith; and I do fur- 
ther pledge myself to report to the President of the University, 
semi-annually, where I am and what I am doing, for three years after 
graduating at said institution." 

Tuition is free. 

The following evidences of scholarship will admit applicants to 
the school: 

1. First-grade certificates. 

2. High school or college diplomas. 



8 Annual Catalogue 

3. Certificates of attendance at other State Normal schools or at 
the University of Illinois. 

4. Appointments from County Superintendents. 

5. A satisfactory examination by the faculty. 

An appointment may be secured from the County Superintendent 
by successfully passing an examination about equivalent to that re" 
quired for a second-grade certificate. 

Each county in the State is entitled to appoint two pupils, and 
each representative district is entitled to appoint, in addition,. as 
many pupils as there are members in the General Assembly from that 
district. Single counties constituting a senatorial district are, there- 
fore, entitled to six pupils; senatorial districts comprising two coun- 
ties, to eight pupils; those comprising three, to ten pupils; and so 
following. In districts composed of two or more counties, Superin- 
tendents desiring to appoint more than two candidates should confer 
with the other Superintendents in the district for an allotment of the 
appointments. 

If applicants have none of the papers mentioned they are exam- 
ined by the Faculty in Reading, Arithmetic, Geography, English 
Grammar, United States History, and Orthography. If found com- 
petent they will be admitted to all of the privileges of the institution. 

There are three courses of study: 

a. The regular English course of three years. 

b. The classical course of four years. 

c. The two-year course for graduates of accredited high schools. 

Pupils are expected to take the regular work of the school. Ex- 
ception is sometimes made, but each case is passed upon individually. 
College graduates will receive special privileges in the choice of 
studies, and will be graduated by special arrangements. 

Any teacher in the State is welcome to come here at any time, to 
remain as long as he pleases, to visit any of the classes and labora- 
tories, and to observe any of our work — all without enrollment or re- 
sponsibility. 

Any one desiring to complete the course in less than the usual 
time will be offered examination in any of the studies. A residence 
of at least one year is required for graduation. Pupils are not per- 
mitted to select studies at pleasure unless they possess unusual quali- 
fications. 

Those desiring to work exclusively in our Practice Department 
will be afforded abundant opportunity to do so if found prepared. 

No person will be entitled to graduate who does not make the 

required standing in each study of the course — either by work in the 

room, or by examination, as described above. Any person is 

entitled to our diploma who shall have completed our required Course 






Illinois Shite Normal University. 9 

of Study, without regard to the time he may have spent here; pro- 
vided, that his residence shall not be less than one year, and that his 
deportment and character shall be satisfactory to the faculty. 

We transfer to our books no marks of standing" from other insti- 
tutions, but work done in other state normal schools and at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois will be accepted in lieu of work required here. 

New students are received at the beginning - of every term. It is 
important that they should be present on the first day of the term, as 
the regular recitations invariably begin on the second day. Failure to 
be present on the first day does not debar one from the privilege of 
joining the school; but every day of delay in entering greatly increases 
the difficulties of the beginner's work. 



Expenses. 

The following estimate of necessary expenses is approximately 
correct: 

NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

Tuition Free 

Board, 39 weeks , $100 to $140 

Washing 15 to 25 

Books and stationery 10 to 15 

Total $135 to $196 

Good rooms and excellent boarding places are abundan t. Arrange- 
ments can be made after arriving here better than by letter. 

Students are advised to bring with them such books as they may 
have, but not to purchase others until they arrive at the University. 
Students arriving on the I. C. and C. & A. railroads should come to 
Normal station; those arriving by other roads can reach Normal 
from Bloomington by street cars. In no case is the hiring of a car- 
riage necessary. 



General Statements. 

Thorough discipline is enforced in every department. 

A certificate is granted for the successful completion of one year's 
work, and another for that of two years. 

New students will receive a hearty welcome to the Young Men's 
and Young Women's Christian Associations of Normal. These organ- 
izations are vigorous and active, and seek earnestly to promote the 
spiritual welfare of the students. 



30 Annual Catalogue 

The Museum and the room for microscopic work are in the Uni- 
versity building, and to these the students of the University have 
access under certain restrictions. 

There is no boarding house connected with the institution. 



Analysis of Course of Study. 

READING.— First Term. 

I. Phonics.— 1. A thorough mastery of the forty-four elementary 
sounds, with study of the movements of the vocal organs in producing 
them. 2. Practice in the use of the diacritical markings used in 
Webster's Dictionary. 

The purpose in this work is to furnish the student a scientific 
basis for teaching the sounds, and to assist him in discovering and 
correcting faults of speech. 

II. Beading. — 1. Several American masterpieces are read during 
the term. 2. Topics are assigned for reference work. 3. Besides the 
general study of the thought an analysis of the structure of the 
selection is sometimes made. 4. In connection with the study of 
the author other selections are read to the class by the teacher to 
extend their knowledge of his works, and to awaken higher ideals 
for oral work. 5. Application of the work in Phonics to the work in 
Reading - . 

The aim is to teach the student how to study a selection so as to 
draw from it real value and enjoyment, and to assist him in acquiring 
power and skill in the use of the voice in expressing his thought. 

READING.— Second Term. 

Two plays of Shakespeare form the text of the term's work. The 
following plays are used: Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Merchant of Ven- 
ice, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Henry IV., Part I. In this work 
special stress is laid upon the natural but expressive and forcible ren- 
dering of the thought. All of the time that can be spared from the 
thought analysis is devoted to practice and drill in oral reading. In 
the thought study some collateral reading is required on each play. 
At least one commentary is read, and, if the play is historical, the 
history to which the play relates is read. 

A series of lessons on method in oral work, and the relation of 
physique and voice to expression, is given. 

ARITHMETIC. First Term. 
I. Primary Arithmetic, five weeks.— (a) Purpose — To outline a 
course In Dumber f or the first four years, and develop and illustrate 



Illinois Shite Normal University. 11 

the principles and methods of instruction. (6) Topics: 1. The logical 
order of number knowledge. 2. The use of counters, blocks, and other 
aids in teaching- number facts to 12, in developing- the decimal system, 
in teaching the fundamental operations in written arithmetic. 3. Oral 
language: Forms of description and analysis appropriate to the sev- 
eral stages. 4. Forms of written work. 5. Number stories and drill 
exercises. The proper use of a primary text-book. 6. Coordination 
of arithmetic with other branches in the primary school. 

II. Factoring, Fractions, etc., seven weeks, (a) Purpose.— 1. To or- 
ganize the student's knowledge of Arithmetic by deriving all number- 
relations and processes from the simple idea, of addition, and the 
grouping of numbers in the decimal system. 2. To suggest methods 
and devices for teaching the several topics. (6) Method. Fundamental 
principle— every process in Arithmetic should be learned as a rational 
process; i. e., an operation with numbers of things. From concrete 
examples there should be a conscious generalization of the process in 
the form of a rule; finally, long-continued drill until the process with 
the mere symbols becomesmechanical. Accordingly what can be done 
with integers is first learned with splints, grouped into bundles in ac- 
cordance with the laws of the decimal system. Fractions are inves- 
tigated by folding and cutting paper circles and paper squares. The 
oral description and written representation of the operations thus 
discovered are succeeding stages, (o Topics. 1. Notation— Laws of 
the decimal system and the Arabic notation; comparison with sys- 
tems of different radix. 2. Fundamental rules— contracted methods. 
3 Factoring— principles of factoring; demonstration of tests of divis- 
ibility; greatest common factor; least common multiple. 4. Cancel- 
lation and straight-line analysis. 5. Fractions — the fractional unit; 
the. functions of the denominator; illustration and demonstration of 
the six principles upon which the various operations depend. Ordi- 
nary text-book topics in fractions. In these the central thought is 
that operations with fractions are fundamentally the same as opera- 
tions with integers, the only difference arising from the different way 
of representing the unit. 6. Decimal fractions— the peculiar nota- 
tion; reading and writing pure and complex decimals; reduction of 
common fractions to decimals; repetends and their simpler laws; 
effects of moving the decimal point; limits of accuracy in multiplica- 
tion and division. Oughtred's Contracted Methods. 

Special attention is given to oral analysis to secure an accurate 
knowledge of the language and facility in the use of the best forms 
of expression. 

The mensuration of rectangles, triangles, circles, rectangular 
prisms, and cylinders is developed in connection with this work. 
Rules of mensuration are derived from an analysis of the forms meas- 



12 Annual Catalogue 

ured. Thus, the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter 
is approximately determined by measuring carefully several cylin- 
drical bodies, and averaging - the quotients obtained by dividing each 
circumference by its diameter. Cook's New Advanced Arithmetic. 

Second Term. 
Topics. 

I. Weights and Measures, three weeks. — Purpose — 1. To interest the 
student in the derivation and meaning of our standards, the history 
of the calendar and kindred topics. 2. To inform the student in regard 
to the conditions that obtain in problems in carpeting, papering, plas- 
tering, land and lumber measure, fencing, the measurement of bins, 
tanks, and cisterns, and other' practical problems. Topics: 1. Tables 
of length, weight, value, etc. 2. The various problems in reduction 
of compound numbers. 3. Addition, subtraction, etc. 4. The interval 
between two dates. 5. Changing from one system to another. 6. The 
metric system. 7. Longitude and Time: Construction of comparison 
table, local and standard time, the international date line. 

II. Square and Cube Boot, four weeks. — Process is derived from the 
geometrical applications; i.e., finding the side of square, or edge of 
cube, whose area, or volume is known. The relations of the sides of 
the right triangle. Surface and volume of pyramid, cone, sphere, 
shell, frustum. Laws of similar figures. Ratio and proportion are 
developed in connection with similar figures. 

III. Percentage, five weeks. Method. — The same forms of analysis 
are used as in common fractions. The three fundamental cases are 
carefully studied, and their applications shown in Profit and Loss, 
Commission, Stocks, Insurance, Taxes, Interest, Discount, and Ex- 
change. In these applications, emphasis is laid on the nature of the 
business, to which percentage is applied. The number-work becomes 
subordinate. 

ALGEBRA.— First Year, Third Term. 

I. Algebraic Notation — Fundamental Operations. — Especial attention 
is given to the reading of algebraic expressions, the discussion of defi- 
nitions, positive and negative numbers, and the derivations of the laws 
of the fundamental operations. Processes and principles are arrived 
at by deductions from definitions, rather than by generalization from 
particular instances. 

I I. Factoring mid Fractions. — These subjects are treated with more 
thoroughness than in any of our elementary text-books. The method 
applicable to each class of problems in factoring, is formulated in a 
rule, describing t lie case and the mode of discovering the factors. 

III. Simple <ind Fractional Equations Problems.- The significance 
of tin- Be vera I tra asformal ions of equations. I low to state a problem. 



Illinois State Normal University. 13 

Second Year, First Term. 
Comparison of the various modes of Elimination. Involution and 
Evolution. Development of the theory of exponents. Quadratic Equa- 
tions. Especial attention is given to the language of Algebra. Read- 
ing of Algebraic expressions in unambiguous phrases; accuracy in 
describing and relating algebraic processes and in stating principles 
established. Rigorous demonstrations are combined with the induc- 
tive method. Went worth's School Algebra. 

GEOMETRY.— Second Term, Third Term. 
The course extends over two terms of twelve weeks each, and in- 
cludes the ordinary High School course, in plane, solid, and spherical 
Geometry. White's Geometry is the text. About one- third of the time 
is devoted to original exercises. Special attention is directed to the 
mechanism of deductive reasoning, the earlier demonstrations being 
developed in complete syllogisms. The several stages of a demon- 
stration are seen and strict conformity to the type required. Review 
exercises include classifications of the established truths of the science 
and schemes for tracing proofs to the original definitions and axioms 
upon which they rest. Forms of geometrical notation are discussed 
and considerable practice is given in brief forms of written work. Two 
main ends are kept in view: to equip the student with the forms of 
deductive reasoning, and to make the study a drill in precise thinking 
and accurate, perspicuous expression. 

BOOKKEEPING.— Six weeks. 
The course includes six typical sets in Single and Double entry, 
with a few leading topics in Business Arithmetic and Commercial 
Law. 

SCHOOL L AW.— Five weeks. 

The text used is Bateman's Decisions. The course is especially to 
instruct in the legal duties and powers of teachers as defined in stat- 
utes and judicial decisions. Other topics discussed are, History of 
Public Education in Illinois, The School Funds, The Various Units of 
School Administration, School Officers — Their Powers and Duties. 

GEOGRAPHY. 
Intermediate Grade. How to teach shape of the earth; motions 
of the earth with their consequences. Importance of their being able 
to read a map right; Geography is a study of things; forms on the 
map are symbols, and stand for things; the things themselves should 
be studied as far as possible; relation of the symbol to the thing. 
Value of pictures in teaching Geography; teacher should make collec- 
tion of geographical pictures; where such pictures can be obtained. 



14 



Annual Catalogue 




o 

00 

c 

u 

> 

*s 

3 






Illinois State Normal University. 15 

Use of the stereoscope in teaching - Geography. To distinguish be- 
tween land and water as represented on a map. Study of the hemi- 
spheres, noting differences and resemblances, and giving reasons for 
names. Study of the continents; number; comparative size; differ- 
ences and resemblances; main purpose, to fix in the mind a picture of 
their forms and relative positions. Study of principal bodies of water; 
oceans, seas, gulfs, etc., noting their forms, and positions relative to 
the continents and to each other. Plan for the study of a continent, 
fitted to home continent. Purpose of plan, to show sequence of topics 
in scientific teaching of Geography; the sequence should show the 
relation of cause and effect; the following sequence suggested: Posi- 
tion, comparative size, shape, outline, surface, drainage, climate, 
vegetation, animals, man and his occupations, minerals, political 
divisions, cities, railroads, etc. Elementary Physical Geography 
should always come first in the study of the continent, country, state, 
etc., as it is the more concrete, and consequently the more interest- 
ing; the Political Geography should come later, as it is more abstract, 
and is largely determined by the Physicial Geography. Study of the 
United States; follow plan for study of a continent. Study modeling; 
model different forms of land and water; advantages of sand model- 
ing: abuses. Review work on home state. Study of other states and 
territories. Follow the natural features, such as watersheds, river 
basins, etc., as far as possible, forming mental pictures, and repre- 
senting these pictures in maps with crayon or pencil, and in the sand. 
Free use of chalk and sand. Relation of Geography to Botany, Zool- 
ogy, etc. 

Intelligent study of History based largely on Geography. Geog- 
raphy and Literature. Study of chief cities, determining reason for 
their location, principal industries and prosperity. Study of the 
principal railroads, showing their importance, reason for their loca- 
tion, their influence on the country through which they pass; influ- 
ence of the country upon railroads. Review government of home 
state; study government of the United States, briefly. Study produc- 
tions, manufactures, commerce, minerals. Difference of chief crops 
minerals, manufactures, etc., of different sections, with reasons for 
difference, as far as possible. 

Method in Geography.— What Geography is. Is it a science? What 
is a science? What Geography is based on. The contents of Geogra- 
phy. The "cement" which holds the geographical concepts in their 
proper places. Why Geography should be taught. 1. For the mental 
discipline that may be obtained from it: its value in cultivating the 
perceptive powers, the memory, the representative and reflective 
powers. 2. Geography should be taught for the knowledge it con- 
tains. 



16 Annual Catalogue 

3. As a basis for the study of other subjects. 4. For its value in con- 
nection with commerce. 5. For its refining- influence. 

Geography can be taught scientifically; the topics can be so ar- 
ranged as to show the relation of cause and effect. The analytic and 
synthetic methods of teaching with the advantages and disadvantages 
of each. Geography is a study of the earth, of forms of land and water, 
etc., and not of symbols, simply. The proper use of maps, pictures 
sand-modeling, etc., in teaching Geography. The making of correct 
mental pictures lies at the base of all true study of Geography. The 
pictures of remote regions must be made from Geographical concepts 
acquired in the home neighborhood; hence the importance of home 
geography. 

Topics in preparing for Geography. Since the making of correct 
mental pictures lies at the base of all true study of Geography, it fol- 
lows that the ideas of Position, Direction, Distance, Surface, Form, 
and Color should be among the first presented to the children, as they 
are essential in the making of pictures. Manner of presentation in 
each instance. Map representation, with the idea of scale; purposes 
of map representation; map of school-room floor; map of the school 
yard and vicinity. Study of the land and water forms in the home 
neighborhood. Slopes, Divides, or Watersheds; Lines of Union of 
slopes, or valleys. Study of the home stream; situation with refer- 
ence to slopes; dependence of streams upon slopes; study of source, 
banks, bed, mouth, tributaries. Pond, lake. Oral descriptions of large 
streams and lakes visited by the teacher. Sand modeling, purpose, 
advantage. Climate: why summer is warmer than winter. The at- 
mosphere; effect of heat and cold on the atmosphere. Evaporation, 
condensation, rain, hail, snow, frost, dew, fog. Circulation of the 
water: history from leaving the ocean until its return; show how it 
benefits man. Study of vegetation of home neighborhoods; why? 
Kinds, uses. Study of animals of home neighborhood; why? Kinds, 
habits, how beneficial to man. Minerals; kinds, uses, mines, miners. 
Races of men; white, black, yellow, brown; homes of different races, 
customs, manners, occupations, education, religion, government. 
Home town: shape, size, surface, drainage, climate, crops, animals, 
manufactures, railroads, notions of commerce, exports, and imports; 
causal relations dwelt upon. Home county as above; county seat; no- 
tions of government, in the home, in the school, in the community, in 
the county. Home state as above: capital, shape, surface, principal 
rivers, direction of rivers determined by surface, principal crops, 
principal varieties of trees, uses; animals, benefits to man. Principal 
cities, with reason for the selection made; why the principal cities are 
so located: principal manufactures in those cities; commerce, showing 
cli icf exports and imports. 



Illinois State Normal University. 17 

GRAMMAR GRADES.— Astronomical Geography. 

Definition of terms. Shape of the earth: proof s of its rotundity; 
proofs of its oblateness. 

Motions of the earth a»d their consequences; rotation on axis; 
day and night; axis; poles; equator; parallels; meridians; latitude; 
longitude: zenith; nadir; vertical line of observer; horizon; revolution 
around the sun; earth's orbit; plane of earth's orbit. 

Declination of earth's axis; relation of declination of axis to posi- 
tion of the tropics; polar circles, and width of zones; relation to circle 
of light, diurnal circle, change of seasons, and to difference in length 
of days. Tests. Study of South America. Position, size, shape, con- 
tour, relief, drainage, climate; effects of altitude upon climate; prin- 
cipal trees, plants, crops; principal animals (wild and domestic); 
inhabitants, with brief treatment of their origin, customs, homes, 
governments, etc. Sketch principal river systems. Study the differ- 
ent countries, with their capitals and a few other leading cities. 
What render the cities important. What the continent produces for 
exportation. What it imports. Relation of production and commerce 
to climate. 

Great Britain and Ireland. Close relation of the United States 
and Great Britain. Importance of the kingdom; small in area, but 
great in power and wealth. Outline; surface; principal rivers; cli- 
mate; crops; manufactures; commerce. Principal cities noted for 
manufactures; for commerce; as educational centers; centers of his- 
torical interest; connected with famous literary works. Reasons for 
more manufactures in some localities than others. Tracing cause 
and effect as far as possible. Sketch maps of important localities. 

Continental Europe. Position; ragged outline; importance of 
study of outline, or contour; benefits arising from irregular coastline; 
surface; influence of surface upon climate, crops, and manufactures; 
drainage; influence of surface upon drainage; principal river systems 
sketched; climate; crops; dependence of crops upon climate. Study 
of different countries; comparative importance of each; in what 
respect important; productions, such as minerals, crops, domestic 
animals, and manufactures. Principal cities; for what noted, manu- 
factures, commerce, schools, and historical events. Governments, cus- 
toms, homes, etc. 

Asia. Outline; relief; back-bone of Asia-Europe; drainage (prin- 
cipal rivers only); climate, effect of great plateaus and high mountain 
barriers upon climate and vegetation, and consequently upon civiliza- 
tion; great forests; great deserts; great plains. Study different coun- 
tries, briefly; their principal productions; commercial importance; 
leading cities, principal exports, imports. The people; their govern- 

—2 



18 Annual Cataloyw 

ment; religion; homes; customs; food; education, etc. Make sketch- 
maps. 

Africa and Oceanica. Studied after the same general plan as 
Asia, but more briefly, exceping Australia, which, because of its im- 
portance, is studied somewhat carefully. 

Much map sketching and sand-modeling throughout the entire 
course, and constant effort to get pupils to think of forms of real 
land and water, instead of being satisfied with thinking of symbols, 
simply. 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. 

What Geography should mean: Comparative Physical Geography; 
physical life of the globe; nature of this life; how it differs from or- 
ganic life. 

Anatomy of the globe; importance of forms of contour and relief, 
and of relative position; importance shown by giving illustrations 
indicating their influence upon climate, vegetation, animal life, and 
industries, and upon civilization, in general. Analogies of the gen- 
eral forms of the continents; Guyot's seven laws of relief; value of 
the laws. Distribution of the plains, plateaus, and mountains in the 
different continents. Volcanoes; their cause; position; linear arrange- 
ment. Theory of earthquakes; history and description of a few of 
the principal ones. Contour and depths of the oceans. 

Physiology of the continental forms: Law of the development of 
life: this law in accord with Laplace's' theory of the development of 
the earth; also with the evolution of human society. Three epochs 
of development; the insular, the maritime, and the continental. The 
formula of development the same for each continent, the entire 
globe, and for vegetable and animal life. A few lessons on element- 
ary geology; formation of coal; glacial epochs, etc. 

Three grand contrasts: Contrast of continental and sea climates. 
Reasons for difference; results of difference as revealed in the animal 
and vegetable kingdoms. The atmosphere; composition; weight; the 
mediator between the continents and the oceans; the bond of society; 
general theory of the winds; the trade winds; monsoons; hurricanes; 
cyclones; etc. Transportation of the waters from the oceans to the 
interior of the continents, and their return to the oceans; the winds, 
the water carriers: influence of mountains on distribution of rains; on 
position of deserts; fertile plains: etc. The tides; cause; benefits. 
Ocean currents; cause; effect on climate; etc. 

( 'out rast of the Old World and the New: Description of each; one 
i he complement of the other; good results of a union of the two. 

( kmtraet of the three continents of the North and the three of the 
South. Consequences of the proximityof the northern continents, as 



Illinois State Normal University. 19 

seen in the vegetation and animals; consequences of the isolation of 
the southern continents. 

Increase of life from the poles to the equator; man an exception; 
law of the distribution of the human race; geographical center of 
mankind; advantage of the temperate climate for the improvement 
of man. The continents on the north the theater of history; conflict 
between the regions north and south of the line of highest elevation 
in Asia-Europe: result of the conflict as shown by history. 

Contrast of the East and West; different forms of civilization 
largely due to geographical environment. The geographical march 
of history; close relation between this march and the geographical 
features of the globe. Numerous illustrations. 

UNITED STATES HISTORY. 
Professional. — Attention called to the material to be used, and t° 
the manner of presenting it to the pupils of the lower grades. 
Primary Grade. — Material. 1. Fairy Tales. 

2. Bible stories. — (a) Chsracters of whose childhood and youth 
most is known: Joseph; Moses; Samuel; David; Jesus, etc. (b) Abra- 
ham; Jacob; Daniel; Paul, etc. 

3. Stories of adventure. — 1. Those that occurred near home; 
(a) experience of hunters: fishermen; travelers, (b) Dangers from 
floods; deep snows; high winds; prairie fires, etc. 2. Those that occurred 
remote from home. On the railroads; in stages; on steam boats, etc. 

4. Stories about Indians. — Their dress; homes; canoes; hunting 
expeditions; war expeditions; cruelty to prisoners; sports of the chil- 
dren, etc. 

5. Explanation of national holidays. — Fourth of July; Memorial 
Day; Thanksgiving Day; Washington's birthday. 

6. Biographies. — Washington; Columbus; Lincoln; Grant; Sher- 
man; Sheridan, etc. 

Method of Presentation. — 1. At first, the teacher must tell the stories. 
The children must not be expected to repeat them. 2. Later on, the 
teacher may read some of the stories, although it is better to tell them, 
and the children should be expected to reproduce them in their own 
language; orally at first, later in writing. The stories can be made 
the texts for the work in language. 

Purpose of the Work.— I. To awaken a historical spirit. 2. To culti- 
vate the imagination. 3. To aid in character building. 

Intermediate Grades. —Material. Biographies. 

Discoveries.— Columbus; the Cabots; Americus Vespucci; Cartier; 
Hudson. 

Explorers.— De Soto; Champlain; La Salle; John Smith; Lewis and 
Clarke; John C. Fremont. 



20 Annual Catalogue 

Colonizers.— Raleigh; Roger Williams; Lord Baltimore; William 
Penn; Oglethorpe. 

Pioneers and Indian Fighters. — Miles Standish; Daniel Boone; 
"Kit" Carson. 

Statesmen.— Benjamin Franklin; Thomas Jefferson; Alexander 
Hamilton; Daniel Webster; Henry Clay; Abraham Lincoln. 

Generals.— Washington; Greene; Scott; Grant; Sherman; Sheridan. 

Naval Officers.— Isaac Hull; Decatur; Perry; Farragut. 

Inventors.— Whitney; Fulton; Morse; McCormick; Howe, etc. 

History of Typical Colonies. — Plymouth; New York; Rhode Island; 
Maryland; Pennsylvania; Georgia. 

Social condition of the people at different periods. — Troubles with 
the Indians; Manner of Living; Homes; clothing; customs; social 
usages. 

Wars. — King Philip's War. French and Indian War; Ticonderoga; 
Quebec. Revolutionary War; Bunker Hill; Valley Forge; Yorktown; 
War of 1812: Lundy's Lane; New Orleans. Mexican War: Buena Vista. 
Cerro Gordo. The Civil War: Fort Sumter; Merrimac and Monitor; 
Malvern Hill; Gettysburg; Vicksburg; The Wilderness; Surrender of 
Lee. 

Method.— & text-book may be used, but better results will be ob- 
tained without, if the teacher be prepared. The narrative form should 
be preserved throughout. There should be a vivid picturing of men 
and events. Pictures and brief historical poems will add much to the 
interest and value of the work. 

Grammar Grades. — Material: 1. A good text-book on the subject. 
2. One or two histories of the United States, more extended than the 
text, for reference. 3. A few historical novels noted for the vivid- 
ness and truthfulness of their descriptions. 4. Collection of poems 
founded on incidents of American history. 

Method. — Frequent reference should be made to the work in the 
preceding grades. The narrative form should still be used. Atten- 
tion should be given to the causes which led to important results. 
The virtues of the people should be pointed out. Their resistance to 
oppression, their sacrifices for the right, and their moderation in vic- 
tory, should be commended. Throughout the entire work, the patri- 
otism of the fathers should be held up for the emulation of their 
sons, and the truth should be emphasized that there can be no true 
freedom where there is not a cheerful obedience to law. 

Academic. — Condition of Europe at time of discovery of America. 
1. Granada conquered by Ferdinand and Isabella. 2. The "War of 
the Roses," in England, closed shortly before by the battle of Bos- 
worth. .'!. Eve of the Reformation. I. Sad condition of the common 

people. 



Illinois State Normal University. 21 

Claims of the Northmen considered. 

Columbus. — Youth; manhood; seeking for aid; aid obtained; the 
first voyage; land discovered; return to Spain; reception at Barcelona; 
effect of discovery on Europe; other voyages; results; old age; misfor- 
tunes; injustice; death. 

Other Spanish discoverers and explorers. 

English discoverers and explorers — The Cabots; Drake; John 
Smith, etc. 

French discoverers and explorers — Verrazani; Cartier; Cham- 
plain: LaSalle; Marquette; the Jesuit Fathers. 

Dutch discoverers. 

Colonization— Spain in the south; England in the center; France 
in the north, south, and west. 

Growth of the colonies — English colonies surpass the others in 
wealth and numbers. 

Troubles — Between English and Spanish colonies. Between Eng- 
lish and French colonies. Nearly all of these troubles grew out of the 
troubles in Europe. 

French and Indian War — Cause; principal events; results; train- 
ing school for Revolutionary War. 

Internal troubles of English colonies— Indians; religious troubles; 
local jealousies. 

Life in the colonies— Religion; education; homes; dress; customs; 
industries: mode of travel: social usages; growth in wealth and popu- 
lation. 

Revolutionary War— Remote causes; immediate causes; principal 
events; principal actors; self-control of the people; respect for law. 

"The Buildicg of the Nation" — Articles of Confederation; their 
insufficiency; danger of disintegration; making the Constitution; the 
Constitution contrasted with the Articles of Confederation. 

Growth of the Nation— The president; financial policy fixed; in- 
ternal troubles; foreign policy fixed; troubles with France; troubles 
with Barbary States; troubles with England. 

War of 1812. — Causes; principal events; results. 

Admission of States. 

Inventions. 

Railroads. 

Development of material resources. 

Slavery. — Introduction; legislation affecting slavery. 

Mexican War. — Cause; principal events; results; acquisition of 
territory; discovery of gold in California; results of the discovery. 

The Civil War. — Causes; principal events; results; abolition of 
slavery; the "New South." 



22 Annual Catalogue 

History of the Nation Since the Civil War. — Admission of States; 
political parties; political policies; labor movements; progress in the 
arts and sciences; achievements in literature; study of political and 
domestic economy; general prosperity. 

CIVIL GOVERNMENT. 

Man, a social being; society, the natural state in which to live, 
hence the necessity of government; right of society to govern its in- 
dividual members: the object. Government in the family; in the 
school; its purpose, nature, and necessity. 

Town Government.— Review system of United States land survey. 
Distinction between a town and a township; the civil town; character 
of its government; departments; officers constituting each depart- 
ment; manner of election; the Australian ballot system; term of 
office; duties; pay; town meeting; time; business; antiquity of town- 
ship government; origin and history of the New England township. 
Pure democracy. 

County Government. — Departments; officers constituting each; 
manner of election; time; duties; the county board; meetings; powers; 
relation of the county to the state; origin of the county; history of 
the New England and Virginia county. Representative democracy. 

State Government. — Historical sketch of Illinois; the Northwest 
Territory; ordinance of 1787; influence on the history of the State; 
Illinois as a Territory; admission as a State; legal boundaries; three 
constitutions; government provided for by the constitution of 1870; 
relation of constitution to constitution of the United States. Legis- 
lative department; legal title; senatorial districts; advantage of two 
houses; members in each house; qualifications; pay; officers of each 
house; powers and privileges of members; duties and obligations; 
minority representative plan; advantages claimed. Executive depart- 
ment; consists of what officers; qualification of each; time and manner 
of election: duties; term of office; pay; responsibility. Judicial de- 
partment; consists of what courts; jurisdiction of each; original and 
appellate jurisdiction; judicial districts and circuits; judges of each; 
juries: grand and petit; duties. State boards; duties; state institu- 
tions, name, location, purpose, support, and government. How taxes 
are levied for state, county, town, and district purposes; equalization 
of taxes. Duties of the citizen to the State; duties of the State to 
the citizen. 

Government of the United States. Thorough review of United 
States History as a basis for the work. Government of the colonies; 
relation of the colonics to each other and to England; the Revolu- 
tionary War: Declaration of Independence; Articles of Confederation; 
need Of a stronger bond: steps leading to formation of consti- 



Illinois State Normal University. 23 

tution: advantages over The Articles; opposition; ratification; ori- 
gin of American political parties. Legislative department; compare 
with British Parliament; how each house is constituted, qualifica- 
tions, election, term, pay, privileges, and obligation of members; 
when Congress convenes; life of one Congress; number of sessions; 
manner of transacting business; committees, journals, etc.; power of 
Congress in regard to taxes; how the government is supported; pur- 
poses of tariff; history of the tariff legislation; commerce; naturali- 
zation: bankruptcy; money; financial doctrines; banking systems; 
postal matters; patents; copyright; piracy; war; armies; militia; Ter- 
ritories; immigration; the writ of habeas corpus; bills of attainder; 
ex post facto laws; a study of English history bearing on these facts; 
titles of nobility; prohibitions on the states; rights of the states; im- 
plied powers of Congress. Executive department; power vested in 
whom; ability to execute the laws; qualification of the President; 
manner of nominating and electing the President; his term of office; 
pay; the Cabinet; responsibility; comparison with English and French 
cabinets; functions of the different departments; principal bureaus 
in each; civil-service reform. Judicial department; consists of what 
courts; appointment of judges; tenure of office; comparison with State 
judiciary; advantages and disadvantages of each system; necessity of 
Federal courts: danger of clashing with State courts. Amendments; 
purpose; further safeguards around the rights of individuals; relig- 
ious liberty; freedom of speech and of the press; right of petition; to 
bear arms; to be secure in person and papers; trial by jury; abolition 
of slavery; civil rights; impartiality in the elective franchise. 

ANCIENT HISTORY. 

What history is; what it treats of; sources, ''monuments, relics, 
and records;" aids to history— ethnology, archeology; philology. Di- 
visions of history; history a continuous whole. Races of mankind; 
the historic race; its divisions. Geographical sketch of the ancient 
oriental nations; historical darkness in Northern Asia; twilight in 
Central Asia; sunlight in Western Asia. 

Hindoostan. The Aryans; early home; migration; plains of the 
Indus and Ganges; conquest of non- Aryans; caste; purpose; effect; re- 
ligion; sacred books; arts; sciences. 

China. The Turanians; early home; migration; conquests; Con- 
fucius; education; civil service; non-intercourse; effect on civilization; 
present condition; the Chinese in the United States. 

Egypt. Geography; influence of the Nile; reason for rise of the 
Nile; brief histories of the dynasties; the pyramid builders; Shepherd 
kings; the Hebrews in Egypt; Seti; Rameses II; Necho; conquest by 
the Persians; Greeks; the Ptolomies; Cleopatra; conquest by Rome; 



24 Annual Catalogue 

religion; tombs; Sphinxes; arts; sciences. Supplementary reading: 
Wilkinson's "Ancient Egyptians;" Eber's "Uarda," and Shakespeare's 
''Anthony and Cleopatra." 

Chaldasa. Description of Tigro-Euphrates basin; the Hamites; 
Semites; civilization; education; books and libraries; religion; arts; 
science. Supplementary reading: Bible history and the "Builders of 
Babel." 

Assyria. Chaldean Colony; growth; power; Sargon; Sennacherib: 
intercourse with the Hebrews; civilization; arts; sciences; Nineveh; 
Bible history; Byron's "Destruction of Sennacherib." 

Babylonia. Overthrow of Assyrian power; Nebuchadnezzar; De- 
struction of Tyre; Captivity of the Jews; Splendor, strength and 
downfall of Babylon; Cyrus the Great; modern researches. Supple- 
mentary reading: Bible history; Rawlinson's "Six Great Monarchies 
of the Ancient Eastern World." 

The Hebrews. Semites; importance in history; our indebtedness 
to them; their origin; Abraham; Jacob; Joseph; Moses; the Exodus; 
Judges; kings; captivity; destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans; 
present condition. 

Phoenicia. Geography; government: T} r re and Sidon; colonizers; 
commerce; alphabet; diffusers of civilization. 

Persia. Geography; Medes and Persians; Aryans; Astyages; Cy- 
rus; Cambyses; Darius I; Revolt of the Asiatic Ionians; Marathon; 
Xerxes, etc.; Alexander the Great; government; religion; art; sci- 
ences. 

Greece. Geography, in full; influence of its geography on its his- 
tory. People; legendary age, a shadowy period; the Heroes. Argo- 
nautic expedition; twelve labors of Hercules; Golden fleece; Trojan 
War; modern explorations of Schliemann. Religion: the twelve great 
deities; minor deities; character of gods; improvement on eastern 
gods; Elysian fields; oracles; sacred games; influence of games on civ- 
ilization; Amphictyonic council; sacred wars. Government; kings; 
Oligarchies; Archons; Tyrants. Sparta: Classes; Lycurgus; govern- 
ment; lands; money; occupations; institutions; education; Messenian 
wars; Tyrteus. Athens: Codrus; Draco; Solon; Public Assembly; Ex- 
pulsion of Tyrants; Clisthenes; ostracism. Wars with Persia; Mara- 
thon. (Read account of battle in Creasy's Fifteen Decisive Battles). 
Aristides; Themistocles; Thermopylae; value of Thermopylae to us; 
Athens destroyed; Salamis (Read Byron's poem: The Isles of Greece); 
Plataea; treachery of Pausanlus; memorials; trophies. Rebuilding 
the walls of Athens; jealousy of Sparta; Confederacy of Delos; effect 
on Athens; "'Age of Pericles;" .strength and weakness of Athens. Pe- 
loponnesian War; cause: character; principal events; pestilence in 
Athens: Peace of Nlcias; Alcibiades: Sicily; defeat; close of the war; 



Illinois State Normal University. 25 

effect on Athens. Spartan supremacy; abuse of power; Theban su- 
premacy; Epaminondas; Leuctra; Mantinea. The Ten Thousand; 
Cyrus; Clearchus; Cunaxa; Xenophon; the retreat. Macedonian su- 
premacy; Character of Macedonians; Philip; effort of Demosthenes; 
Chaeronea; Alexander; Wars in the North; Issus; Thebes; Invasion of 
Asia; Granicus; Tyre; Egypt; Alexandria; Arbela; Babylon, etc.; Bac- 
tria; India; down the Indus; desert of Gedrosia; Babylon; death; burial; 
influence of conquests; division of empire; history of each division. 
Arts and sciences. Architecture; sculpture; painting - ; poetry; great 
poets;. great epic; compare with English arid Italian epics; lyrics; com- 
pare with English lyrics; drama and great dramatists; compare with 
English drama; history and historians; orators and oratory; compare 
with Webster, Pitt, etc. Philosophy and philosophers; comparison of 
deductive and inductive reasoning; the Stoics; Epicureans; influence 
of Greek philosophy on modern thought. Mathematics; astronomy; 
geography; social life; education; position of women; theatrical en- 
tertainments; banquets; Symposia; slavery; homes; domestic economy. 
The Greeks, the schoolmasters of the world. 

Rome. — Geography of Italy; people; beginnings of Rome; 
legends; the kings; expulsion of the kings; efforts to regain power 
(Read Macaulay's "Horatius"). Religion; comparison with religion 
of the Greeks; Lares and Penates. Social classes; names of Romans. 
The Republic; officers; senate; first session of the Plebs; cause; re- 
results; Coriolanus (Read Shakespeare's "Coriolanus"); Cincinnatus; 
"The Cincinnatus of the West;" the Decemvirs; their work; miscon- 
duct (Read Macaulay's "Virginia"); overthrow; Military Tribunes; 
Censors; destruction of Rome by the Gauls; Rome rebuilt; death of 
Manlius; laws of Licinius Stolo; effect on Rome; Samnite wars; re- 
volt of the Latin cities; war with Pyrrhus; cause; events; results. 
First Punic War; Rome and Carthage compared; cause of war; Sicily; 
Rome builds fleets; Regulus; close of war. Second Punic War: Han- 
nibal; Spain; Saguntum; the Alps; Ticinus; Trebia; Trasimenus; 
Fabius the delayer; the American Fabius; Cannae; Capua; Metaurus 
(Read account of battle in Creasey's "Fifteen Decisive Battles"); 
Zama; close of the war; results. Third Punic War; cause; Masinissa; 
perfidy of Rome; defense of Carthage; destruction. War with Mace- 
don; conquest of Greece; destruction of Corinth; compare with de- 
struction of Carthage and Numanti. The Servile War; cause; result; 
public lands; the Gracchi; fate. Jugurthine war; bribery; Marius; 
Sulla. The Cimbri and Teutones; destruction of the barbarians. The 
Social War; cause; results. The Civil War: Mithridates; conflict be- 
tween Marius and Sulla; flight of Marius; return; ferocity; death; re- 
turn of Sulla; proscriptions; death. Pompey the Great in Spain; the 
Gladiators; defeat; destruction; Ferres in Sicily; conquest of Pirates 



26 Annual Catalogue 

by Pompey; Mithridates; description of Raman triumph; Catiline: 
Cicero. The First Triumvirate; Duumvirate; rivalry; Caesar in Gaul; 
Great Britain; the Rubicon: flight of Pompey; Pharsalus; death of 
Pompey; Caesar in Egypt; Pontus; Thapsus; death of Caesar: funeral 
oration; fate of the conspirators; Caesar as a Statesman (read Shake- 
speare's "Julius Caesar"). The Second Triumvirate; Antony and 
Cleopatra; Antony and Octavius; Actium; founding of the Empire; 
Augustus. Rome, the law giver of the world. 

MEDIAEVAL HISTORY. 

Rome under Augustus; boundaries of the empire; nature of the 
government; public buildings; education; literature; social conditions; 
the birth of Christ. Tiberius; the crucifixion of Christ. Nero; Ves- 
pasian; the taking of Jerusalem; Titus; the destruction of Hercula- 
neum and Pompeii; Trajan; the Antonines; Diocletian; persecution of 
the Christians; Constantine the Great; Christianity favored; Constan- 
tinople; Julian the apostate. 

The Goths; Theodosius; Alaric; Attila and the Huns; Genseric and 
the Vandals; fall of the western Roman Empire; influence of the fall 
upon the history of the world. Clovis and the Franks; other Teutonic 
tribes; conversion; monasticism; fusion of the Latin and Teutonic 
peoples; the three elements of civilization. 

Mohammed and the Saracens: conquests, east, west, and north; 
contact with the eastern Roman Empire; conquest of Spain; invasion 
of France; battle of Tours; result. The Crusades; cause; history; 
results; influence on civilization. Charlemagne: dominion; purpose; 
achievements. The Northmen and their aggressions. Rise of the 
Papal power; mission of Rome; the great schism; the iconoclasts; 
feudalism; chivalry. 

The Celts in Britain; the Romans; the Saxons; rivalry between 
the Celtic and the Roman church; the Heptarchy; the Danes; Alfred 
the Great; Dunstan; Edward the Confessor; the Norman conquest; 
influence of the conquest upon the history of England; conflict of 
kings and the church; Thomas a Becket; conquest of Ireland; Magna 
Charta; first parliament; wars with the French; wars with Scotland; 
War of the Roses; the Tudors; Henry VIII and the Reformation; 
Mary I; Elizabeth; literature of the period; the Spanish Armada. The 
Stuarts; James I, and the colonization of America; trouble with the 
Puritans; war between Charles I and parliament; Cromwell; the res- 
toration; the revolution of 1689; cause; result; effect upon American 
colonics. 

France; Germany; Spain: Ftaly; Luther and the Reformation in 
Germany; Loyola and the Jesuits. Rise and growth of the Ottoman 



Illinois State Normal University. 27 

Empire; invasion of the eastern Roman Empire; downfall of Constan- 
tinople; influence of fall upon Europe. Growth of cities; conflict 
between cities and nobility. Printing - . Discovery of America. 

DRAWING.— Two Years, Two Lessons Per Week. 

1. Aim — 1. To teach Drawing- as a language. 2. To lead pupils 
to seek culture from the beautiful in nature and art. 3. To promote 
mental development. 

2. General Points.— 1. Drawing a language. 2. Drawing based upon 
form study. 3. Three divisions of drawing as to use: Drawing show- 
ing construction. Drawing showing- appearance. Drawing- of the 
enrichment or decoration. 4. An object may be pictured by repre- 
senting its outline, its light and shade, or its color. 

3. Form Study. — In clay, (a) Natural objects: Fruits, leaves, veg- 
etables. (b) Geometric Forms: Sphere, cube, cylinder. 

4. Drawing. — Suggestions for movement and position. Geometric 
views. Construction drawing - . 

Color. — 1. Source of color. 2. Use of color. 3. Effect of color. 
4. Theory of color. 5. Color harmony. 6. Drawing in color: 1. From 
nature. 2. From common objects. 

DRAWING.— Second Year. 

History. Architecture. Ornament. 

Ancient Period. — Egyptian school. Greek school. Roman school. 

Mediaeval Period. — Byzantine school. Saracenic school. Gothic 
school. 

Modern. — Renaissance. 

Pupils make drawing's of the characteristic elements of construc- 
tion and ornamentation. 

Light and shade (with pencil). From cast. From nature. From 
common objects. From models. 

Illustrative drawing. From nature; cast; copy. This work is an 
effort to acquire skill in rapid illustrative work, and the material is 
gathered from any source. 

PENMANSHIP. 
Outline of work. 

Aim.— I. To fix clearly in the minds of the pupils the following- 
fundamental ideas: 1. To write well requires a correct conception of 
what is to be written. 2. Ability to execute that conception with 
pen, pencil, or crayon. 3. This ability must be gained through care- 
ful practice, for it is an acquired habit, and habit comes from repeti- 
tion. 4. The practice must be careful, else, instead of eliminating, 
the pupil will only be confirming a faulty habit. 5. It requires but 



28 Annual Catalogue 

little time to acquire a correct mental picture of a letter compared 
with the time required to train the muscles to make it rapidly 
and easily. Hence, by far, the greater share of the time should be de- 
voted to training - the muscles. 6. Movement is the mainspring of anj 
good writing system, and the muscular movement is by all authorities 
conceded to be the best. 7. To improve writing, we must improve 
our habits of making the individual letters. To do this, the best waj 
is to repeat the same letter in an exercise with constant effort at im- 
provement. 

II. To make the transition— for with most pupils it is a transi- 
tion — to muscular movement, and give as much drill as the time will 
permit in movement exercises for the purpose of securing control of 
this movement. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

Purpose: 

1. To furnish relief from mental effort. 2. To develop a robust 
physique. 3. To correct unequal development and faulty carriage of 
body. 4. In some measure to secure gracefulness. 5. To prepare the 
student to assist his own pupils physically as well as mentally. 

The work: 

1. Free gymnastics throughout the year. 2. Apparatus work dur- 
ing the Winter Term and part of the Fall and Spring Terms, work 
with pulleys, on bars, horse, ladders, ropes, and poles. 3. Dumb bell 
work. 4. Club swinging. 5. Games for children and Delsarte part of 
Spring and Fall Terms. 

Although the work is done in classes an effort is made to adapt it 
to the individual needs. The classes meet twice per week. 

For the apparatus work a special suit is necessary costing from 
$3.0(i to $6.00. Flannel (navy blue or black) is the best material for 
this purpose. It is better to have it made after arrival. 

VOCAL MUSIC. 

1. Methods of instruction in elements of vocal music. 

2. Practice in reading in five keys. 

3. Philosophy of transposition. 

4. Choral practice. 

GRAMMAR. 
Relation of thought to language. Nature of a thought and a sen. 
tence. Simple, complex, and compound thoughts and the correspond- 
ing forms of sentences. Classification of sentences on the basis of 
relation of speaker to listener. Simple, complex, and compound ideas 
necessitating words and phrases. The clause, and the thought form 
that gives rise to it. Principal and subordinate ideas in the thought 
and tin- modi lied and modifying elements in the sentence. Objects, 



Illinois State Normal University. 29 

attributes, and relations, ideas of them, and the language forms ex- 
pressing these ideas. Nature of each part of speech. Analysis of 
some short classical selection. Constant drill in application. Method 
of induction followed, the laws being the outcome of the direct exam- 
ination of numbers of all varieties of thought and language forms 
discussed. The last three weeks of the term are devoted to a discus- 
sion of the necessary incidental work and of how to select, arrange, 
and present the language work proper to the primary grades. 

Third Term. Etymology. Each part of speech discussed fully. 
Double nature and function of words. Modification within the word. 
English idioms, their growth from natural expressions and their ele- 
ments. A thorough study of a standard selection from the standpoint 
of grammar. A term essay on some grammatical subject. 

The last three weeks are given to a discussion of method in lan- 
guage work in the intermediate and grammar grades. 

OUTLINE OF WORK IN RHETORIC. 

1. Principles controling the Choice of Words. 

2. The Nature and Structure of the Sentence. 

3. The Nature and Structure of the Paragraph. 

4. The Whole Composition: The choice of subject, Plan, Devel- 
opment. 

5. Processes of Composition: Description, Narration, Exposition, 
Argumentation. 

An effort is made to awaken the critical instinct in the hope of 
securing three ends: A purer diction of speech; a greater enjoyment 
of good English in books; and an appreciation of the fundamental 
qualities of good composition, — unity, directness, clearness, and sim- 
plicity. Constant practic is given in working out special problems 
of composition. 

LITERATURE. 

The work in Literature runs through three terms, one of which is 
given up wholly to the drama. Twenty-seven weeks are left, there- 
fore, for the study of the whole body of English literature. Very 
little of this time can be spared for the study of mere literary history. 
A text-book, either Stopford Brooke's Primer of English Literature, 
or Shaw's New History of English and American Literature, revised 
edition, is put into the hands of pupils to be used for reference, and 
the library is freely drawn upon for the same purpose. 

We prefer to the historical hand-book the careful study of a few 
authors in their best works. The works thus studied are chosen for typ- 
ical excellence, that is, as well representing the author himself, his 
period, and a type of literature. Through the study of these works 
we seek acquaintance with individual authors, with literary forms, 



30 Annual Catalogue 

and with the relation of literature to life. Some change is made 
from year to year in the authors and works chosen, but every year we 
make a study of the drama, the epic, the narrative poem, or minor 
epic, various minor poetic forms, the essay, the novel, and the argu- 
mentative speech. 

During- the year 1896-7 the works studied have been, Chaucer: 
The Prologue, Knightes Tale, and Nonne Prestes Tale; Shakespeare: 
Macbeth, King Lear, Hamlet, Merchant of Venice, and Richard II; 
Marlowe: Edward II; Milton: Paradise Lost, I-II; Wordsworth: Se- 
lected Poems; Tennyson: The Idylls of the King; Scott: Waverly; 
George Eliot: Silas Marner; Thackeray: Peadennis; Emerson: The 
American Scholar, Self-reliance, and Compensation; Matthew Ar- 
nold: Sohrab and Rustum, and Culture and Anarchy. Of these 
works, those by Chaucer, Milton, Wordsworth, and George Eliot, to- 
gether with three of the plays from Shakespeare, and Arnold's Soh- 
rab and Rustum, have received detailed study in the class-room. The 
rest have all been read by all the members of the class; four critical 
essays have been prepared upon them by each member of the class, 
and have been presented before the class, where they have formed 
the basis of discussion lasting several days. 

SHAKESPEARE AND MARLOWE. 

1. Plays read: Macbeth, King Lear, Hamlet, Merchant of Venice, 
Richard II, and Marlowe's Edward II. 

2. Object sought: An intelligent reading of dramatic literature. 

3. Points emphasized: 1. The Drama is Literatuie, not Philoso- 
phy, not Ethics, not History; yet, the Drama is philosophical, ethical, 
historical. 2. Whatever philosophical, ethical, or historical lessons 
the drama has to teach, these lessons are best reached through a. sym- 
pathetic study of the Drama as Literary Form. Therefore, in the first 
dramas read we follow closely the Dramatic Construction, observing 
the Induction of the action, the Development, the Climax, the Evolu- 
tion, and the Catastrophe. 

4. Along with Dramatic Construction, and belonging to it, we 
study Characterization; Dramatic Motives; Dramatic Dialogue; Solilo- 
quy; Sequence of Scenes and Actions; Dramatic Illusion; Dramatic 
Time; Tragic Retribution; Differences between Tragedy and Comedy. 
After the class has become somewhat accustomed to following the 
dramatic development of an action, less close attention is paid to this 
in class, and we proceed at once to the characterization and motiving, 
and the consideration of the play as a revelation of life. 

5. Macbeth, Lear, and Hamlet were read in the class-room and 
discussed at length. The others were read in private by all the mem- 



Illinois State Normal University. 31 

bers of the class; essays were then prepared by all; two or three of 
these essays were read in class and formed the basis of a general dis- 
cussion lasting two or three days for each play. In all this work, the 
student is urged to postpone the reading of commentators until he 
has studied the plays themselves, and begun, at least, to form his own 
judgments. Independence of opinion, and a willingness to hold the 
judgment in suspense and wait for further light are always encour- 
aged. 



Course in Natural Sciences. 



ZOOLOGY. 

1. Collection of Insects; Study of Insects; Principles of Classifica- 
tion developed by comparing and contrasting several kinds of Insects. 
2. The Crayfish, studied alive and then dissected (type of Crustacea) . 3. 
External characteristics of Birds. Analysis of Birds (Jordan's Manual). 
4. Study of the following animals alive; dissection as types: (a) Earth- 
worm (Vermes); (6) Clam (Molluska); (c) Perch (Pisces); (cl) Frog 
(Batrachia); (e) Snake (Reptilia); (f) Pigeon (Aves); (g) Rabbit 
(Mammalia). 5. Study of live Hydra. 6. Study of a few Protozoa. 
7. Study of Starfish and Sea-urchin (alcoholic). 

Drawings and descriptions of animals studied preserved in perma- 
nent note-book. 

Text-books: Packard; Colton's Practical Zoology. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

1. Muscle. (1) Experiments on the Muscles in our bodies. (2) 
Models of Human Muscles. (3) Dissection of hind leg of rabbit. (4) 
Structure of Muscle, (a) gross; (b) minute. (5) Action of muscle (ex- 
periment on frog's muscle). (6) Training of Muscles (symmetrical 
development). 

2. Bone. (1) Bones as levers. (2) Bones as protectors (brain and 
spinal cord). (3) Bone structure, (a) gross; (6) microscopic. (4) Joints, 
(a) Dissection of joints of rabbit's leg, and beef joints. 

3. General Functions of the Nervous System, Sensation, and Mo- 
tion. 1. Experiments on frog, reflex action of the Spinal Cord. 2. 
Dissection of Spinal Cord and Brain of cat. 3. Voluntary Motion. 4. 
Sensation of Touch. 

4. Circulation. 1. External indications of the Circulation of 
Blood: Heart beat, pulse, blushing, pallor, experiments on veins, etc. 
(a) Microscopic Examination of frog's blood, (b) Circulation of blood 
in web of frog's foot under microscope. 2. Internal proofs of the Cir- 
culation of the Blood; (a) Dissection of heart and lungs (sheep or 



32 Annual Catalogue 

pig-), (b) demonstrative of the action of the heart, (c) injection of 
arteries, (d) tracing injected arteries and veins. 3. Description of 
Organs of Circulation and their action, (a) Action of frog's heart, 

(b) action of the heart, (c) experiments illustrating the action of the 
large arteries, (d) action of the medium-sized arteries (plain muscle 
fiber), (e) veins (valves). 4. Blood and Lymph, (a) Microscopic ex- 
amination of drop of blood from finger, (b) composition of blood, (c) 
coagulation of blood, (d) injection of thoracic duct (lymph). 5. Hy- 
giene of Circulation. 

5. Respiration. 1. Org-ans of respiration. 2. Mechanical process 
of respiration. 3. Experiments illustrating respiration. 4. Capacity 
of the lungs. 5. Composition of air. 6. Experiments illustrating the 
chemistry of respiration. 7. Experiments showing the differences 
between inspired and expired air. 8. Production of heat and motion 
in the body. 9. Comparison of the human body and a locomotive. 
10. Hygiene of respiration. 

6. Excretion. 1. The Skin. Functions: (a) Excretory, (b) heat- 
regulating-, (c) protective, (d) sensory, (e) absorptive. 2. The Kidneys, 
(a) dissection of pig's or sheep's kidneys, (b) action of the kidneys, 

(c) relation of the lung's, kidneys, and skin. 

7. Digestion. 1. Foods and cooking. 2. Dissection of the digestive 
organs of a cat. 3. Study of cross and longitudinal sections of teeth. 
4. The salivary glands. 5. Experiments with artificial digestion. 
6. Absorption. 7. Hygiene of dig-estion. 8. Taking "cold," diarrhoea, 
bathing. 

8. The Nervous System. Functions of the Brain and Spinal Cord. 
Hygiene of the Nervous System. 

9. The special senses. Sight, (a) dissection of the eye, (b) ex- 
periments on accommodation, (c) experiments on blind spots, (d) 
experiments on color contrast, (e) experiments on adaptation to 
amount of light. Defects in vision. Hygiene of the Eyes. Smell and 
Taste. Hearing. The voice and speech. Dissections of the Larynx. 

Drawings and descriptions of dissections made in books. 
Text-book: Martin's Human Body (briefer course). 

BOTANY. 

1. Planting seeds (corn and beans); their structure and growth. 
2. Buds, structure, protection, arrangements, kinds, growth. 3. Study 
of early flowers, Ilepatica, Spring- Beauty, Trillium, Blood-root, etc. 
Study of Types: 1. G reen slime (Protophyta). 5. Moss (Bryophyta). 
6. Fern and Horsetail (I'teridophyta). 7. Scotch Pine and Austrian 
Pine (Gymnosperms). 8. Common flowering plants (Anglosperms). 

I [erbarium required. Notes and drawings of plants studied. 

Text- book: Gray's School and Field Book. 



Illinois State Normal University. 33 

PHYSICS.— First Term. 

The following is a list of the exercises which are worked out ex- 
perimentally by the student, and recorded in a note-book. This labor- 
atory work is preceded by the study of a manual and by preliminary 
directions by the instructor, and is followed by the study of a text- 
book. Recitations are upon both experimental work and text. 

1. Mensuration. — 1. Length in metric units. 2. Relation between 
circumference and diameter of a circle. 3. Volume of an irregular 
bod} r . 4. Cross-section and diameter of a tube. 5. Weight of a cubic 
centimeter of water. 6. Weight of a dollar and a dime. 

..'. Density and Specific Gravity, Including Mechanics of Fluids. — 1. De- 
termination of density of a solid. 2. Specific gravity of a liquid by 
specific gravity bottle. 3. Weight lost by a body immersed in liquid. 
4. Specific gravity by immersion. 5. Floating bodies. 6. Liquid pres- 
sure due to weight. 7. Pressure on bottom of vessel. 8. Specific grav- 
ity of liquid by balancing columns. 9. Comparison of gases and liquids. 
10. Measure atmospheric pressure— barometer. 11. Specific gravity 
of liquids by balancing against the atmospheric pressure. 12. Boy e's 
law. 13. The siphon. 14. The "Hero's fountain." 

3. Mechanics of Solids, Dynamics. — 1. Action of a force upon a body. 
2. The force of friction. 3. Composition of forces. 4. Parallel forces. 
o. Action and reaction. 6. Comparison of masses by inertia. 7. Accel- 
erated motion. 8. Pendulum. 9. Levers. 10. Pulley. 11. Inclined plane. 
12. Wedge and screw. 13. Tenacity. 14. Elasticity. 

4. Heat. — 1. Effect of heat upon size. 2. How heat travels. 3. Test- 
ing thermometers. 4. Temperature and physical form. 5. Laws of 
cooling. 6. Melting and boiling points. 7. Heat capacity. 8. Deter- 
mination of specific heat. 9. Latent heat. 10. Coefficient of linear 
expansion. 11. Coefficient of expansion of gas. 12. Coefficient of ex. 
pansion of a liquid. 13. iVbsorption and radiation. 14. Solution. 

Second Term. 

5. Magnetism. — 1. General study of a magnet. 2. Action of at- 
tracted body on magnet. 3. Mutual action of two magnets. 4. In- 
duced magnetism and breaking magnets. 5. Law of induced magnets. 

6. Lines of magnetic force. 7. Terrestrial magnetism. 8. Theory of 
magnetization. 

6. Static 'Electricity. — 1. Mutual action of electrified bodies. 2. The 
pith-ball electroscope. 3. Transferring electrification. 4. Induced 
electrificatior. 5. Law of induction. 6. Charging by conduction. 

7. Charging by induction. 8. The electrophorus. 9. The electrical 
machine. 10. The condenser and Leyden jar. 11. Electromotive force 
and resistance. 

-3 



34 Annual Catalogue 

7. Current Electricity.— 1. Production of current by chemical action. 

2. Conditions for producing current. 3. Action of currents on mag- 
nets. 4. Conditions affecting resistance. 5. Effect of series and par- 
allel resistances. 6. Methods of connecting cells. 7. Resistance 
measured by substitution. 8. Resistance measured by Wheatstone 
Bridge. 9. Electro-magnetism. 10. Induced currents. 11. The dy- 
namo and motor. 12. The induction coil and telephone. 

8. Light. — 1. How light spreads from a center. 2. Intensity. 

3. Shadows. 4. Images through small aperture. 5. Reflection from 
plane mirrors. 6. Curved mirrors. 7. Images from plane and curved 
mirrors. 8. Refraction and total reflection. 9. Refraction by lenses. 
10. Images from lenses. 11. The spectrum by dispersion. 

9. Sound. — 1. Vibratory and wave motion. 2. The vibration of 
strings. 3. Speed of sound waves. 4. Reinforcement. 5. Interfer- 
ence. 

Manual — Allen. Text — Avery. 

CHEMISTRY.— Third Term. 

The course consists of a systematic study of the most common 
elements and compounds, and the development of the laws and the- 
ories of chemistry. Students follow the direction of the text in doing 
work in the laboratory, and recite upon this experimental work. All 
processes, laws, and theories are illustrated and verified by experi- 
ment. Careful records of all work are kept in permanent notebooks. 
Reactions are shown by diagrams and equations. 

1. Elements and Compounds. — Iron, oxygen, iron oxide, phosphorus, 
phosphorus oxide, mercury, mercury oxide, carbon, carbon monoxide, 
carbon dioxide, hydrogen, water, sulphur, sulphur oxides, sulphurous 
acid, sulphuric acid, phosphoric acid, carbonic acid, zinc, zinc oxide, 
iron sulphide, hydrogen sulphide, iron sulphate, copper, copper oxide, 
magnesium, magnesium oxide, magnesium sulphate, calcium, calcium 
oxide (quick lime), calcium hydroxide (slaked lime), calcium sulphate 
(gypsum and plaster of Paris), calcium carbonate (marble or chalk), 
sodium, sodium oxide, sodium hydroxide, sodium sulphate, sodium car- 
bonate (sal soda), sodium amalgam, chlorine, hydrochloric acid, so- 
il in in chloride (salt), calcium chloride, potassium, potassium oxide, 
potassium hydroxide, potassium sulphate, nitrogen, nitrogen oxides, 
nitric acid, potassium nitrate (niter or saltpetre), ammonia, ammo- 
nium hydroxide, ammonium chloride, ammonium sulphate, ammonium 
nitrate. 

l',(tcrss(s. Lausand Theories. Analysis, synthesis, oxidation, re- 
duction, allol ropy, crystallization, reaction, metalhesis, deliquescence, 
efflorescence, neutralization, relation of acids, bases and salts, law of 



Illinois State Normal University. 35 

Boyle, law of Dalton (or Charles), law of conservation of mass, atomic 
theory, law of definite proportions by weight, law of multiple propor- 
tions, Prout's hypothesis, law of definite proportions by volume (Gay- 
Lussac), molecular theory, hypothesis of Avogadro (or Ampere), 
theory of Dulong and Petit, periodic law (Mendeleeff). 
Text— White. 

ELEMENTS OP PEDAGOGY.— First Year, First Term. Two Hours 

a Week. 

The purpose of this work is the introduction of those who have 
just entered the Normal School to the subject of Pedagogy. The stage 
of their professional scholarship necessitates the selection of subject 
matter that shall be simple and interesting. The course begins with 
two introductory lessons in which an attempt is made to show in what 
especial fields their study will lie, the way in which the child has been 
regarded, generally, in the older systems of education, and a few defi- 
nitions which are intended to set certain limits to the work of the 
term. 

Following these lessons come discussions of the general equipment 
of the average child when he enters school, the discipline through 
which he has acquired the equipment, the general principle of apper- 
ception, and the modern movement in child-study with its relation to 
the work of the teacher. 

In order to make clear the successive steps by which modern edu- 
cational ideas have made a place for themselves, the study of educa- 
tional reformers occupies the remainder of the term. 

Beginning with the Revival of Learning, the educational ideals 
are carefully examined and their peculiar forms explained. The trans- 
formations of these ideals through the work of the reformers are 
studied and the contributions of Comenius, Rosseau, Pestalozzi, and 
Froebel are especially noted. The Orbis Pictus, Emile, and Leonard 
and Gertrude are examined and commented upon quite fully. 

The thought movement for the term is the introduction of the idea 
of sense training by Comenius, and its historical development by the 
later reformers. 

PEDAGOGY.— First Year, Second Term. 

CHAPTER I. 

The work opens with Special Method in History and Literature 
for the eight grades. It is the object of .this work to discuss and 
illustrate the principles underlying the arrangement of a complete 
course in History and Literature for the eight grades and the method 



36 An mod ( Catalogue, 

of presenting such material to a class. Some time is spent in becom- 
ing acquainted with stories from history and literature that are suit- 
able for children, as a basis for more intelligent discussion of their 
educative value. The teacher needs to be acquainted with many of 
the classic fairy stories, such as those prepared by Scudder, or the 
Grimm brothers; he should be familiar with the story of Robinson 
Crusoe, with many of the classic myths of the Orient, and the Pioneer 
History Stories of America. 

This preliminary work is followed by a discussion of the text of 
McMurry's "Special Method in History and Literature." 

1. Introduction: The relation of Literature, as the great ethical 
power in culture, to the main aim of education, — character-building, — 
to the cultivation of the child's aesthetic tastes, his sympathies, and 
powers of thought. Duty of the school in bringing the influence of 
literature to bear upon the masses. Relation of school to home. 

2. Fairy Tales in First Grade: Sympathy between child and fairy 
tale. Popular objections to fairy stories. Their validity. The five 
requirements of a classic fairy story. The oral presentation of the 
fairy stories and their reproduction by the children. Relation of the 
stories to the other work of the first year, c. g., as furnishing suggest- 
ive materials for drawing and language and as cultivating the power 
of oral speech. Relation of stories to first work in teaching reading. 
Discussion of the methods of teaching reading to beginners. 

3. Robinson Crusoe in the Second Grade: History of the story of 
Robinson Crusoe. Comparison with the Fairy Tales. Discussion of the 
moral, industrial, and economic value of the story. Relation of the 
story to the other work of the second year, especially to nature study, 
drawing, modeling, and language. Method of presentation suitable 
to the story of Robinson. 

4. Myths in the Fourth Grade: Definition of the myth. Distin- 
guished from the legend and history. How valued by literary artists. 
The characteristics of the myths and their value to child culture. 
Methods in teaching the myths. 

5. Pioneer History Stories in the Fourth and Fifth Grades: Tran- 
sition from the mythical to the historical hero. Child's interest in 
attractive biography. Lists of Pioneer History Stories suited to the 
Fourth and Fifth Grades. Character of the early pioneers of America. 
The value of oral presentation in history; method of oral presentation; 
reproduction of the stories by the pupil; difficulties in adopting an 
oral presentation of history stories. 

History in the Seventh, Eighth, and Ninth Grades: Full and de- 
tailed treatment of typical periods. Use of the biographical element. 
Arrangement of topics and relation of the history to the other work 
of these grades. 



Illinois State Normal University. 37 

CHAPTER II. 

The "Special Method in Geography" is given in Ihe regular class 
work in geography, the last half of the first term being devoted to 
that purpose. 

CHAPTER III. 

In the work in Special Method, both in history and literature, 
and in geography, illustrative lessons are given, making use of some 
of the materials discussed. A few lessons, especially in literature, 
are given before the students, by the assistant training teacher, with 
a class of little children in the practice school. These lessons are 
made the subject of discussions on methods and devices employed. 

PEDAGOGY.— First Year, Third Twrn. 

CHAPTER I. 

The first month is devoted to Special Method in Reading. A num- 
ber of readers for the earlier grades, and of literary masterpieces 
suitable to the different grades, are read and discussed; 1, as to 
whether they meet the requirements of interesting and instructive 
thought content, and, 2, as to whether they are well adapted to ad- 
vance the child in his mastery of the mechanical phase of reading. 
The text of McMurry's "Special Method of Reading," is then read 
and discussed. Lists of classic literary masterpieces suited to the 
different grades are noted, and their culture values, both to the child 
and to the teacher, are discussed. The work is closed with some ex- 
position of the method of teaching reading in the different grades. 

CHAPTER II. 

The second month of the term is devoted to a discussion of the 
Special Method in Teaching Natural Science. Early in the term, the 
students are set to work to make observations upon some of the ob- 
jects of nature about them, c. g. the red maple and the robin, for the 
purpose of acquiring some idea of the meaning and value of the di- 
rect observation of nature, both as furnishing the basis for true 
scientific knowledge, and as a preparation for the work of teaching 
natural science. These objects are watched during the spring 
months, and their development and habits noted daily, as accurately 
as possible. These observations are later made the basis of a full 
discussion of the objects observed, for the purpose of illustrating the 
principles of selection and treatment of materials in teaching nat- 
ural science to children. After these type objects have been fully 
treated, the principles involved are discussed, as follows: 1. Selection 
of materials for nature study. 2. Preparation of the teacher. 3. Ex- 



38 Annual Catalogue 

cursions and observations by the children. 4. Methods and devices in 
the discussion of topics. 5. Type studies in natural science. 6. Value 
of nature study to the child and to the teacher. 

CHAPTER III. 

The third month is devoted to a discussion of the general laws 
underlying" the method of instruction (or the so-called "Formal Steps 
of instruction"), and of kindred pedagogical principles bearing upon 
the work of the teacher in the class room. It is the aim of this work 
to show what the laws of thought are that determine how the teacher 
must present a subject to the class. 

PSYCHOLOGY— First Term. 

1. Psychology and Its Relations to the Teacher. 

2. The Educational Limitations of Psychology. 

3. The Treatment of Psychology adopted. 

4. The Bases of Psychical Life, (a) Sensation, (b) Interest, (c) 
Impulse. 

5. The Psychical Processes, (a) Introduction: Classification of 
contents of our minds, (b) Classification of processes corresponding 
to these contents, (c) the processes: 1. Non-voluntary attention. 
2. Association. 3. Voluntary attention. 4. Educational Principles. 
5. Apperception and Retention. 

6. Forms of Intellectual Development, (a) Principles of intellec- 
tual development, (b) Stages of intellectual development: 1. Train- 
ing of perception. 2. Training of the memory. 3. Training of thought. 

7. The forms of Emotional Development, (a) Conditions of inter- 
est, (b) Principles of emotional growth, (c) The forms, or stages of 
emotional growth. 

8. Forms of Volitional Development, (a) Factors of volitional 
development. (6) Stages of volitional development. 

9. Mind and Body, (a) Importance of body for soul, (b) Struc- 
ture of nervous system in man. (c) Elementary properties of nervous 
structure, (d) Psychological equivalents, (e) Localization of func- 
tion, if) Educational principles. 

10. Summary of Principles, (a) Bases of instruction, (b) Ends of 
instruction, (c) Methods of instruction, (d) Relation of knowledge, 
feeling, and will, (e) Criticisms of maxims. 

11. The method of interrogation. Art of Questioning, (a) Intro- 
duction, (b) Objects of questioning: 1. Testing retention. 2. Train- 
ing of apperception, (c) Qualifications of the questioner, (d) Matter 
and form of questions, (e) Matter and form of answers. 

Text-book. Applied Psychology. Mc Lellan and Dewey. 



Illinois Stale Normal University. 39 

ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY.— First Term. 
Introductory. 

1. Science and Method of Psychology. (a) Subject matter of 
Psychology, (b) Methods of Psychology: (1) Introspective; (2) Ex- 
perimental; (3) Comparative; (4) Objective. 

2. Mind and Modes of Activity, (a) Aspects of Consciousness, (b) 
Relations to each other, (c) Relations to the whole self. 

3. Knowledge. 

1. Elements of knowledge: («) Sensation in General. 1. Physical 
Stimulus; 2. Psychical Factor; 3. Relat ior s of Psychical and Physical; 

4. Functions of Sensation in Psychical Life, (b) Special Senses — Re- 
lations to Touch. 1. Touch: I. Weber's Law and Psycho-physical 
Methods. I[. Muscular Sensation. 2. Smell. 3. Taste. 4. Hearing. 

5. Sight. 6. Temperature. 7. General Sensation. 

2. Processes of Knowledge: (ce) Nature of Problem: I. Sensations 
and Known Objects. 2. The Knowing Self . (b) Apperception: 1. Prob- 
lem of Apperception. 2. Kiuds of Apperception, (c) Association: 1. 
Conditions. 2. Forms. I. Simultaneous or Fusion. II. Successive: 
By Contiguity; by Similarity. III. Functions of Association, (d) Dis- 
sociation. 1. Relation to Association. 2. Conditions. 3. Functions in 
Psychical Life, (e) Attention. 1. Attention as Selecting Activity. 
2. Attention as Adjusting Activity. 3. Attention as Relating Activ- 
ity. (/) Retention. 

3. Stages of Knowledge: (a) Perception. 1. Of Objects. 2. Of 
Space. 3. Of Externality in General, (b) Memory. 1. Definition and 
Problem. 2. The Memory Image. 3. Memory of Time. 4. Self as Past 
and Present, (c) Imagination. 1. Definition. 2. Ideals in Imagina- 
tion. 3. Practical and Theoretical, (d) Thinking. 1. Definition and 
division. 2. Conception; growth of knowledge. 3. Judgment; Belief. 
4. Reasoning. I. A priori and a posteriori. II. Inductive and. Deduc- 
tive. 5. Systematization. (e) Intuition. 1. Intuition of the World. 
2. Intuition of Self. 3. Intuition of God. 

Feeling.— Second Term. 
1. Introduction. 2. Sensuous Feeling. 3. Formal Feelings, (a) Of 
present adjustment. (6) Due to past experience, (c) Directed toward 
the Future. 4. Development of Qualitative Feeling, (a) In Universal- 
ity. (6) In Denniteness. (c) Abnormal, (d) Conflict of . 5. Intellectual 
Feeling, (a) General Nature, (b) Spring to intellectual action, (c) 
Objective side. 6. ..Esthetic Feeling. I. General Nature, (a) Con- 
nection with Idealization, (b) Universality of Beauty, (c) Factois of 
^Esthetic Feeling— Harmony. II. As a Spring to Action, (a) The 
fine arts. III. The ^Esthetic Judgment— Taste. 7. Personal Feeling. 



40 Annual Catalogue 

1. General Nature, (a) Social, (b) Moral, (c) Religious. II. As a 
Spring to Action, (a) Social Institutions. III. The Personal Judg- 
ment — Conscience. 

The Will. 

1. Sensuous impulses, (a) Keflex action, (b) impu'ses of percep- 
tion, (c) instinctive impulses, (d) Instincts of expression. 

2. Development of volition, (a) Desire, (b) Choice — Motive. (c) 
Realization of motive. 

3. Physical control, (a) Localization of motor impulses, (b) Com- 
bination of motor impulses. 

4. Prudential control, (a) Development of desire, (b) Choice of 
ends and means, (c) Forms of prudential control. 1. Practical. 

2. Intellectual. 3. Emotional. 

5. Moral control, (a) Development of ethical desire, (b) Ethical 
choice, (c) Results of moral action. 1. Generic volition. 2. Regula- 
tion of desires. 3. Accurate and intuitive choice. 4. Effective exe- 
cution. 

Text: Dewey's Psychology. 

PHILOSOPHY OP EDUCATION.— Third Term. 

Parti. Education in its general idea: (a) Its Nature. 1. Possible 
only to self-active beings. 2. Education by Divine Providence, by 
experience, or teachers. Relates to body, intellect, and will; must be 
systematic; conducted in schools, (b) Its form. 1. Self -estrangement, 
work, play. 2. Habit. 3. Authority, obedience, punishment, (c) Its 
Limits. 1. Subjective limits in the pupil's capacity. 2. Objective 
limit in the pupil's wealth and leisure. 3. Absolute limit in the 
pupil's completion of school work. 

Part II. Education in its special elements, (a) Physical. 1. Die- 
tetics. 2. Gymnastics. 3. Sexual (omitted), (b) Intellectual. 1. Psy- 
chological epochs, (a) Intuitive- sense-perception, (b) Imaginative — 
fancy and memory, (c) Logical. II. Logical order, (a) of development 
of the pupil, (b) of development of the subject, (c) of demonstration. 

1. Analytic. 2. Synthetic. 3. Dialectical. III. Instruction, (a) Pupil's 
capacity, (b) Pupil's act of learning. 1. Mechanical. 2. Dynamical. 
.'{.Assimilative. {<•) Method of instruction. 1. Living example. 2. Text- 
book. 3. Oral, id) Will training. 1. Social usages. 2. Moral training. 
(a) The Virtues, (b) Discipline, (c) Character. 3. Religious education 
(omitted). 

Part [II. Education in its particular systems, (a) National. 1. Pas- 
sive, (a) Family— China, (b) Caste— India, (c) Monkish— Thibet. 

2. Active, (a) Military Persia. (6) Priestly— Egypt, (c) Industrial — 
Phoenicia. 3. Individual. (a) Aesthetic— Greece. (b) Practical — 



Illinois State Normal University. 41 

Rome, (c) Abstract Individual — German tribes, (d) Theocratic — The 
Jews, (e) Humanitarian, or Christian. I. Monkish. II. Chivalric. III. 
Citizen. 1. For special callings, (a) Secular, (b) Jesuits, (c) Pietistic. 

2. To achieve an ideal of culture, (a) Humanist, (b) Philanthropist. 

3. For free citizenship. Text-book, Rosenkranz. 

PEDAGOGY— First, Second, Third Term. Three Hours a Week. 

Topics for Study. 1. The Chief Aim of Education. 2. The Rela- 
tive Value of Studies. 3. Nature of Interest. 4. Concentration. 5. Ap- 
perception. 6. Induction. 7. The Formal Steps. 

Examination of the Course of Study below the High School. 1. 
Fields which the course of study must cover. 2. Value of Literature 
as an introduction to the life of the school. 3. Essential nature of a 
story. 4. Method of estimating- the value of the story for the primary 
grades. 5. List of stories suitable for first grade. 6. Place of science 
in primary grades. 7. Suitable topics for fall term, winter and spring 
terms. 8. Reading. What is it? What associations should be formed? 
9. What error often made? 10. How help the child to help himself? 
11. How can literature and science be utilized? 12. Illustrative exer- 
cises given by training teachers with class. 13. Careful study of the 
exercise. Similar illustrative exercises in other parts of the course 
with a review of special methods. 



Practice Work in Model School. 



(See Courses of Study.) 

Each Normal student is required to teach four terms in the Prac- 
tice School, for forty-five minutes each daj , not less than three terms 
of which shall be actual work of instruction. At least one term must 
be spent in the Primary Grades. All practice work is performed 
under the immediate oversight of the training teachers. The work of 
criticism is both personal and general. The general criticisms are 
given in teachers' meetings, one of which is held each week. The 
special criticisms are given in grade meetings and in personal inter- 
views. Pupil teachers must submit plans of work to their supervisor, 
which must be approved before being put into execution. They are 
held responsible for the control and general management of their 
classes. They are expected to make personal studies of the pupils, 
so that they may give accurate descriptions of their character, per- 
sonal peculiarities, habits of study, and general disposition. 

Generally each pupil teacher is under the observation of one or 
more pupil teachers, who make careful notes of the work. By this 



42 Annual Catalogue 

arrangement the training teachers are enabled to determine accur- 
ately the skill with which discipline is maintained in their absence. 

The practice work of the pupil teachers reaches from the first 
grade of the Primary School through the iirst year of the High 
School. In addition to the work of instruction, pupils are required 
to take charge of a room during opening exercises, and to have the 
management of children as much as possible. 

Frequent illustrative exercises, conducted by training teachers, 
are given to the whole body of pupil teachers. These cover a variety 
of subjects, but are usually given in those studies in which there is 
the greatest probability of a lack of skill on the part of the pupil 
teachers. 

Persons desiring to fit themselves for primary teachers are per- 
mitted to put in all of their time with the training teacher having 
the lowest departments in charge. 

During recesses and noons children are under the general oversight 
of pupil teachers, who make careful studies of individual pupils as 
they manifest their dispositions in games or other recreations. 



Department of Ancient Languages. 



LATIN. 



1. Collar and Daniell's First Latin Book. 

Roman pronunciation with careful attention to long vowels. Con- 
stant drill in pronunciation, paradigm forms, translation, and compo- 
sition. Thoroughness in all this elementary work will be insisted 
upon. The ability slowly and painfully to recall forms is of no value. 
Twenty-one weeks. 

2. Eutropius or Viri.Romae. Six weeks. 

The purpose of this course is to give practice in translating easy 
Latin. 
:{. Beginning Caesar. First ten chapters of Book I and all of Collar's 

Latin Composition, based upon the same. The Lineal Belationship of 

Latin and English. 
A treatment of the two-thirds of English classically derived. The 
laws of the derivation and all the important types of the words com- 
ing from Latin (1) through Popular French, (2) through Learned 
French, (3) directly. Special pains will be taken to explain those 
whose derivation has been obscured by Popular French changes, as 
quaint from cognitum, gist tromjacet,joy from gaudia, queue from caudam, 
marvel from mirabilia, city from civitalem. A printed outline of this 
work will be furnished the student. Course {.'») occupies twelve weeks. 



Illinois State Normal University. 43 

4. Second and Third Terms Caesar. Twenty-seven weeks. 

Drill upon the uses of the various cases, the subjunctives, the 
gerund and gerundives, the indirect discourse. Extended study of 
minor grammatical principles. The advance lesson each day is trans- 
lated as literally as is consistent with fair English; the review more 
freely. Parts of the text are translated slowly and critically; rapid 
translation of other portions; sight translations. Life of Cassar. 
Geography of Italy and Gaul. History of the age. Books 1, II, IV, 
and the historically interesting portions of V-VI1. The historical worth of 
Caesar's Commentaries. Their literary value. Character of Caesar as 
shown in his own story. 

Collar's Composition based upon Book II. 

Cognate Belationship of Latin and English. 

It is the aim to give in simple form instruction in such main re- 
sults of modern philological thought as arelndispensable to those who 
wish to teach Latin and English as related languages. This will in- 
clude: 

A preliminary glance at Old English and its development into 
Modern English. 

The relation of the native one-third of English in a cognate way to 
Latin. The Latin correspondent of each English vowel and consonant 
will be shown. Quite a mass of material in the way of cognate words 
and suffixes will be used in illustration, — thus, frater and brother, hostis 
and guest, lacrima and tear, ring and circus, fagus and book, anscr and 
goose. A printed outline of this work will be furnished the student. 

5. Cicero. Four Catiline Orations, Archias, Ligarius, Manilian Law. 

Collar's Composition, Part 1 V. 
Critical translations of some portions; rapid translation of other 
parts. Syntax. Life of Cicero. Related history, geography, and biog- 
raphy. The Augustan Age. Thought analysis of orations. Written 
re-review of two in exceptionally smooth English. A persistent effort 
is made to secure from the pupil clear, forcible English that is at once 
worthy of the masterpiece he is translating and indicative of the 
constructions in the original. Continued attention to the lineal and 
to the cognate relationship of Latin and English. Sight reading. 
Twenty-seven weeks. 

6. Ovid. Selections, mostly from the Metamorphoses, 1,500-2,000 lines. 

Life and works of Ovid. Elementary principles of versification. 
Scansion. Kelsey's Greek and Boman Mythology. Twelve weeks. 

7. Vergil. JEneid, Books I- VI. 

Related biography, history, geography, and mythology. Careful 
study of versification. Facility in scansion required. Sight reading 
The literary value of the ^Eneid. Twenty-one weeks. 



4i Annual Catalogue 

8 and 9. Horace. Selections from Odes. Livy. Selections from hooks 
XXI, XXII. 
These courses are offered that our graduates who teach Latin 
may have had a taste of work more advanced than is found in a high 
school course. Study of Horace's versification and new construc- 
tions. Study of comparative syntax based upon Livy and Caesar. 
Related history, biography, etc. Eighteen weeks. 
10. Tacitus (optional). Germania, or Agricola, or both. Twelve weeks. 

GREEK. 

1. Beginning Greek. Frost's Greek Primer and Goodwin's Grammar to 

match. 
Constant drill in pronunciation, translation, and composition. 
Thoroughness in all this work will be insisted upon. The ability 
slowly and painfully to recall paradigm forms is of no value. Fifteen 
weeks. 

2. Zenophon. Anabasis I-l\ : or Anabasis 1-11, and selections from Ilel- 

lenica and Memorabilia. Sight translation. Greek prose composition. 
Critical translation of portions of the text; free translation of 
other parts. More extended study of minor grammatical principles. 
Related geographjr, history, and biography. Composition work based 
upon the text. Elementary derivation work. Goodwin's chapter on 
word-formation. Thirty-nine weeks. 

3. Herodotus. Selections from Persian Wars. 

Study of Ionic forms and comparison with corresponding Attic 
forms. Classical geography studied in so far as useful for an intelli- 
gent exposition of the text. Sight translation. Related geography 
and history. Twelve weeks. 

4. Homer. Iliad, Books I-1V; or I-1I, and an equivalent for III-IV from 

the Odyssey. 
Related history and geography. Greek mythology. Homeric 
forms compared with Attic and Ionic. Careful study of versification. 
Facility in scansion required. Rapid translation of portions of text. 
Critical exposition of other parts. Derivation work. Twelve weeks. 

5. Philological Work. 

During the Greek course the cognate relationship of Greek to 
English and to Latin will be systematically studied, the rules for con- 
sonant and vowel correspondents learned and fully illustrated. 



Illinois State Normal University. 45 

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN. 

1. Joynes-Meissner's German Grammar and Boisen's German 

Prose. Fifteen weeks. 
Three weeks are spent upon a brief synopsis of grammatical 
paradigms and the translation of illustrative sentences. Then from 
80-100 pages of prose are read and the grammatical work based upon 
the text. Inductive study of the cognate relationship of English and 
German. The pupils discover for themselves, by means of a classifi- 
cation of the German words that they have had, the vowel and the 
consonant correspondences existing between German and English. 

2. Minna von Barnhelm. Eight weeks. 

3. Jungfrau von Oreeans. r Ten weeks. 

4. Hermann und Dorothea. Six weeks. 

During the reading of (2), (3) and (4) the student is led to acquire 
a vocabulary. Attention is paid to helpful English cognates of new 
German words. Especial study of the conversational idioms that 
occur in the texts read. Some drill in composition. Considerable 
use of German as the language of the class room. English— German 
philology. 

The above comprises the first year's work in German. The sec- 
ond year's work varies somewhat, from year to year, as to the texts 
read. The following would be a representative program: Schiller's 
Wilhelm Tell, Buchheim's Deutsch Lyrik (The selections from Heine, 
Schiller,Gcethe, and some others), Goethe's Egmont, Heine's Hartzreise, 
Freytag's Soil und Haben; some easy sight reading. Philological, 
conversational and composition drill. 



POLITICAL ECONOMY. ( Twelve weeks. ) 

1. Production.— Land and Natural Agents, Labor, Origin, and 
Office of Capital, Productive Capability of a Community. 

2. Exchruvji.— Theory of Value, Theory of International Ex- 
changes; Money and its Value, Debased Coin, Seigniorage, Incon- 
vertible Paper Money, Bank Money; Reaction of Exchange upon 
Production. 

3. Distribution.— Parties to the Distribution of Wealth: Rent, In- 
terest, Profits, Wages, Minor Shares, Reaction of Distribution upon 
Production. 

4. Consumption. — Subsistence, Population, Appearance of New 
Economic Wants, Consumption, the Dynamics of Wealth, Reaction 
of Consumption upon Production. 



46 Annual Catalogue 

5. Application of Economic Principles. — Usury Laws, Banking 
Functions, Co operation, Trades Unions and Strikes, Unearned Incre- 
ment of Land, Political Money, Bi-Metallism, Pauperism, Revenue of 
the State, Principles of Taxation, Protection and Free Trade. 



Courses of Study for the Practice School, 



In the following outlines for the work of the Practice School the 
work in Music and Gymnastics does not appear. Systematic exer- 
cises in both Singing - and Physical Culture are introduced in all 
grades. 



Primary Department. 

FIRST GRADE. 

LITERATURE. 
First Term— Fall. 
Stories 1-0 in "Classic Stories for the Little Ones." Thanksgiv- 
ing - and Christmas stories. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Stories 7-11, in "Classic Stories for Little Ones/' Stories of Lin- 
coln, Washington, Longfellow, and Lowell. 

Third Term— Spring. 

Stories 12-15, in "Classic Stories for Little Ones." Stories of 
Froebel and stories in connection with Arbor Day and Memorial Day 
exercises. 

Children memorize many beautiful poems throughout the entire 
year. 

NATURE STUDY. 
First Term- Fall. 

1. Life History of Dog, < !ow, Sheep, Squirrel, Rabbit, Mouse, Rat. 

2. Preparation of familiar trees with large buds, as walnut, hick- 
ory, buckeye, and poplars for winter rest, associated with gathering 
Of aiil uiiin leaves. 



Illinois State Normal University. 47 

Second Term— Winter. 
1. Winter study of Austrian Pine as type of Evergreen Trees. 
2. Scotch Pine, Hemlock, and Norway Spruce by comparison with 
Austrian Pine. 3. Horse, Cat. 4. Chicken (type of birds). 

Third Term— Spring. 

1. Plant seeds of Lima Bean, Sweet Pea, and Nasturtium. Watch 
development throughout term. 

2. Buds of Apple, Cherry, and Plum. This study is begun before 
the buds are swollen at all. The study of the cherry is continued until 
cherries are ripe, and the other fruits are watched throughout the 
term. 

3. Duck (type of water bird). Goose by comparison with the duck. 

READING. 

The children are introduced to Reading through games for which 
directions are given at the board in writing. The vocabulary which 
the child has used in his plays and games becomes his first reading 
vocabulary. Later the following books are used: 

Cyr's Primer. 

Stickney's Primer. 

Cyr's First Reader. 

Thompson's Fairy Tale and Fable. 

Thompson's Fables and Rhymes for Beginners. 

Hodskin's Little People's Reader. 

Phonics. — Sounds of the vowels and consonants in most common 
use in the readers. Letters not marked. Children are taught to 
recognize new words as fast as possible by making use of their knowl- 
edge of the sound values of letters. 

NUMBER. 

There are no regular classes in number work. Incidentally to the 
other -subjects, especially nature study, the children learn to count 
and to perform simple operations, basing their work upon the need 
of quantitatively measuring their experiences. 

WRITING— WRITTEN LANGUAGE— SPELLING. 

The writing begins with blackboard exercises. The children 
draw, with large, free movements, many objects (such as the cart- 
wheel, bushel basket, etc.,) in which they are interested and which 
supply plenty of opportunity for movement. This work in movement 
is then carried over into the large, free writing of the names of 



48 Annual Catalogue 

objects drawn. Later they write short sentences about the animals 
and plants studied. Needed capitalization and punctuation taught. 
First desk work as large as the desk will permit. 

DRAWING. 

Holding of simple objects studied in science, as eggs, nuts, fruits, 
animals, etc. Drawing of similar colored objects with crayons, such 
as buds, leaves, etc. Painting of same in water colors. Paper cut- 
ting and pasting. Blackboard and pencil illustrations of stories in 
literature. Drawings of human form, a child posing as model. 

The teacher's method leaves the child wholly free in his execu- 
tion, merely directing his observation or arousing his imagination 
preliminary to the effort at expression. 

SECOND GRADE. 

LITERATURE. 
First Term— Fall. 
Robinson Crusoe, chapters 1-10; or Hiawatha, sections III, VI, VII, 
VIII, IX. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Robinson Crusoe, chapters 11-20; or Hiawatha, sections X, XI, 
XIV, XVIII, XX. 

Third Term— Spring. 
Robinson Crusoe, chapters 21-29; or Hiawatha, sections V, XIII, 
XXI, XXII. 

The chapters referred to above are to be found in "Robinson 
Crusoe for Boys and Girls." 

NATURE STUDY. 
First Term— Fall. 
Continue and complete study of apple and plum begun in spring. 
The Grape, ripened fruit on vine. 
Watermelon and Muskmelon from flower to fruit. 
Cabbage butterfly. 

Caterpillars frequenting a»ny of the trees previously studied or 
the grape, and their preparations for winter. 
Preparation of plants for winter. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Snow ( Irystals. 

Sail, sulphur, and Quartz Crystals by comparison with Snow Crys- 
tal*. Kinds and formation of pebbles and stones. 



Illinois State Normal University. 



4 ( .) 




50 Annual Catalogue 

Crow and owl. 

Goat (by comparison with sheep, if the latter has already been 
studied). 

Arrival of early spring- birds — time noted. 

Watch for any change in the buds of linden, larch, birch, and 
willow trees. 

Third Term— Spring. 

Continuation of study of trees as in preceding term. 

Brown thrush and yellow-winged woodpecker. 

Seeds of melon, corn, and morning-glory sown. Watch develop- 
ment. 

Grape — buds and blossoms. 

Violet. Lily. 

Honey bee. Firefly. Fish. 

READING FOPv THE YEAR. 

"Classic Stories for the Little Ones." 

"Nature Stories for Young Readers,"' Vols. I and II. 

Poems connected with Literature and Nature Study. 

Grimm's Fairy Tales, Vol. I, Wiltse. 

"Pets and Companions," Stickney. 

"Seed Babies," Morley. 

Second Reader, Cyr. 

Continuation of work in phouics as outlined for first year. 

NUMBER FOR THE YEAR. 

The work in number for the year is based upon actual measure- 
ments. The children are led to ideas of numbers and their relations 
by the measurement of things within their experience. Through this 
work of measurement the following number facts and processes are 
developed and fastened by drill: 

(a) The forty five facts in addition. 

(b) Addition of single columns of figures by grasping the tens, sum 
not to exceed 20; thus, add 7, 4, 3, 2; the children see a ten in the seven 
and the three, which put with the four and two makes sixteen. 

(c) Addition of two-place numbers, sum of neither column to ex- 
ceed nine. 

(d) Since 3+4=7, 13+ 4 = 17, and 23+4=27, etc. Similar additions 
carried to 100. 

(c) Understanding of all two-place numbers as composed of tens 
and units. 

(f) Subtractions suggested by (a) and (c). 



Illinois State Normal University. 51 

(g) Figures, Roman numerals, and names of numbers to 100. 
(li) All tables of compound numbers in common use. 
(i) Divisions, Multiplications, and Partitions, to 20. 
(./) Multiplication tables of 2s, 5s, 10s, and lis. 
Hall's Arithmetic Reader is used in Review. 

WRITTEN LANGUAGE— WRITING- SPELLING. 

Stories based on Nature Study and Literature, the sentences 
being" connected in thought. 

Poems copied. 

Short stories reproduced by children as tests. 

In addition to the points insisted upon in the first year, the chil- 
dren learn to paragraph. 

Blackboard and desk exercises for freedom of movement in 
writing. 

Bath writing and spelling are taught incidentally to the work in 
written language. 

DRAWING. 

The method of the first grade is continued with new and more 
difficult materials. The child is especially stimulated to reproduce 
animal and human forms in action. Stories are illustrated by paper 
cuttings. 



Intermediate Department. 



THIRD GRADE. 
LITERATURE. 
First Term— Fall. 
Hawthorne's Wonder Book. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Hawthorne's Tanglewood Tales. 

Third Term— Spring. 

Lamb's Adventures of Ulysses. 

Church's Story of the Iliad. 

Oral presentation. Use of good pictures. Develop a healthful 
imagination. Secure full and clear reproductions. Let the moral 
judgment of the children be developed by estimating the characters 
and their deeds. Develop outlines and let each child preserve them 
in his blank book. 



52 Annual Catalogue 

NATURE STUDY. 
First Term— Fall. 

The corn plant; life history, parts, uses. 

The grasshopper. 

Dissemination of seeds. Cocklebur, milkweed, thistle, golden- 
rod, sunflower, sycamore, etc. 

The bullfrog". 

The crow. 

Migration of birds. Time. 

Heat. Production, effects, effects upon vegetation. Frost. The 
thermometer. Boiler house, a study of our system of heating and 
ventilation. 

Second Term— Winter. 

Gray hare. Home, habits, enemies, manner of living. 

Crystals. Snow, sugar, salt, alum, saltpetre. 

The hard maple's preparation for spring. Sap in February. Vapor- 
ization, clouds, rain. 

The stars and larger constellations; the moon and its changes. 

Arrival of early spring birds. Bird calendar. 

Third Term— Spring. 

Changes in the buds of the soft maple, box elder, birch, and wil- 
lows. Blossoms, seeds, leaves, seedlings. 

Continue study of birds as above. Include nesting, rearing of 
young, food, songs, etc. 

The robin. The woodpecker. 

The honey bee. 

The potato. 

Excursions are to be taken with the children throughout the year 
as often as necessary and as the weather permits, in order that the 
work may be based on the pupils' personal experiences. 

BEADING FOR THE YEAR. 

Scudder's Fables and Folk Lore. 

Mrs. McMurry's Robinson Crusoe. 

Stickney's iEsop's Fables. 

Stickney's Hans Andersen's Fairy Talcs, First Series. 



Illinois State Normal University. 53 

HOME GEOGRAPHY. 
First Term— Fall. 
Visit to cupola of Normal School. Home neighborhood, prairies, 
forests, city, village, roads, bridges, slopes, brook. 
Farmer's fall work. Preparations for winter. 
An October garden. 

The campus. Slopes and drainage. Sand modeling. Map drawn 
to a scale. Miller Park relief. Forest Trees. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Farmer's winter work. Feeding stock. Stockyards. Shipping. 
The nursery. Grafting. 

The carpenter shop. The wagon shop. Blacksmith shop. 
School-room drawn to a scale. 

Third Term— Spring. 

The nursery. Kind of trees, packing, shipping. 

The garden in April, May, and June. Relation to hot-bed. 

The green-house. 

Farmer's spring work. 

Court house, records, court rooms, trials, etc. 

Local history and management of the town. Council, streets, 
police, etc. 

Parks and monuments, with their history. 

In the study of each of the phases of industrial home geography, 
(blacksmith, wagonmaker, nurseryman, farmer) especial attention is 
given to bringing out their relations to one another, looking ulti- 
mately towards notions of the division of labor, inter-dependence of 
trades and industries. Notions of physical geography are drawn from 
excursions in the neighborhood. During the year the stories of the 
"Seven Little Sisters" are presented orally wherever they are best 
suited to the work in home geography, and as the first introduction 
to other countries. 

NUMBER FOR THE YEAR. 

Mastery of tables in addition and subtraction. 

Understanding of all three-place numbers as composed of hun- 
dreds, tens, and ones. 

Addition of columns of three-place numbers. Thorough under- 
standing of reduction. 

Mastery of subtraction. 

Drill on such examples as, What number added to 4 makes 10? 
Added to 5, 7, 6, 8, etc.? Sums and difference up to 20, as 9+9, 8+7, 
7+6; drill on endings, as 48+3, 68+3, 98+3. 



54 Annual Catalogue 

Reading and writing - numbers to millions. Test understanding of 
composition by frequently asking" "what" and "how many."' 

Tables of linear, liquid, dry measure; of time, weight, and money. 

Cook & Cropsey's "Elementary Arithmetic," pp. 7-130. Make the 
arithmetic class a reading class at times when necessary. 

Concrete examples from excursions in geography and science; 
draw on child's environment for materia's. 

Exact mathematical language in analysis; accurate, neat form in 
board work. 

LANGUAGE— SPELLING-WRITING. 

Language, spelling, and writing are taught in connection w T ith 
the other studies, especially geography, literature, and science. 
These furnish abundant, familiar, and interesting subject matter, and 
the motive for either oral or written expression. The aim is fluency, 
freedom, variety. Corrections spring wholly from the child's needs. 
Thirty to forty short compositions from each child during the year, 
written, corrected, and copied under the supervision of the teacher. 

Special drill hours for writing are devoted to securing good move- 
ment and form. In other subjects requiring writing the child is ex- 
pected to preserve, first of all, good position and movement. Form 
to be left to time. 

DRAWING FOR THE YEAR. 

Perspective of large, coarse, curved-edged objects. Work for 
freedom and proportion. 

Studies from nature in both fall and spring. 

Studies from the subject matter of literature, geography, and 
science. Holiday illustrations. 

Clay work in ths fall and spring. Blackboard work. 

The following list suggests the character of the studies: 

Tub, drum, peck measure, bushel basket, kettle, keg, crock, bucket, 
coffee-pot, flag, gun, hatchet, sword, cap, Christmas stocking, tree, 
common tools, sled, basket, gray hare, thermometer, oil can, water 
sprinkler, mittens, kite, small alarm clock, broom, brush, views of 
human form, branching of trees, leaves, flowers. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

HISTORY. 
First Term— Fall. 
McMurry's Pioneer History Stories. Oral presentation of the 
stories of Joliet and Marquette, Hennepin, LaSalle, The Sioux Mas- 
sacre, George Kogers Clarke. 



Illinois State Normal University. 55 

Second Term— Winter. 
From the same source the stories of Boone, Robertson and Sevier, 
Lincoln, Cincinnati and Marietta. 

Third Term— Spring. 
From the same source the stories of Lewis and Clark, Fremont, 
De Soto. 

For method see under Literature for Third Grade. See page 51. 

NATURE STUDY. 

First Term— Fall. 
Cabbage butterfly. Caterpillars. 
Turtle. 

Grape— the ripened fruit. 
Wild grasses. 

Preparation of animals and plants for winter. 
Migration of birds. Time. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Winter study of evergreens on campus. 
The sun — sunlight, sunglass, prism, colors, position of sun. 
Sources of springs, rivers, wells. Porosity. 
The pump. Construction. 

Third Term— Spring. 
Review third grade work on maple, boxelder, birch. 
Fertilization and the part insects play in the fertilization of plants. 
Grape — buds and blossoms. 

Germination. Bean, corn, buckeye, walnut, maple. Seeds 
watched. 
Crayfish. 

Apple and plum blossoms. Formation of fruit. 
Robin, woodpecker, turtle dove. 



READING FOR THE YEAR. 

Hawthorne's Wonder Book and Tanglewood Tales. 

Eliot's six stories from the Arabian Nights. 

Francillon's Gods and Heroes. 

Bryant's Translation of Ulysses among the Phseacians. 

Kingsley's Water Babies. 

Use of dictionary acquired. 



56 Annual Catalogue 

GEOGRAPHY. 
First Term— Fall. 
The Illinois river; the x>rairies of Illinois; corn and live stock in 
Illinois; the coal mines of Illinois; a trip on the Upper Mississippi; 
pineries and lumbering in Minnesota; Minneapolis as a trade center; 
the great wheat region of the Northwest; several great trade routes 
to Chicago. 

Second Term — Winter. 

Lake Superior. St. Mary's Canal and Falls. 

The iron mines of Michigan. (Blast furnace). 

Chicago as a trade center. 

Tobacco raising in Kentucky. Tobacco region. 

The surface of Tennessee. 

The lower Mississippi. Jetties. 

Third Term— Spring. 

Cotton raising in Mississippi (cotton belt). 
Springfield and State government. 
Sugar in Louisiana. 

Cattle ranch in Texas (great grazing region). 
Pike's Peak and vicinity. 
Irrigation and the Big Ditch at Denver. 
Yellowstone Park. 

Oral presentation as described under Literature for third grade. 
See page 51. Free use of sand and chalk. 



ARITHMETIC FOR THE YEAR. 

Mastery of multiplication tables. 

Principles underlying multiplication. Relation to addition. 

Multiplication of six-place numbers by 1, 2, 3, and 4-place num- 
bers. 

Short division. Six-place dividend. 

Mastery of long division. 

Review old tables of denominate numbers. Add square and cubic 
measure. 

Cook & Cropsey's Elementary Arithmetic, p. 131-224. 

LANGUAGE— SPELLING— WRITING. 
Expansion of work for third grade. See third grade, page 54. 



Illinois Shite Normal University. 57 

DRAWING FOR THE YEAR. 

Perspective of simple straight-edged objects. 

Studies from nature. 

Studies suggested by history, geography, science. Holiday illus- 
trations. Clay work. Blackboard handling. 

The following list is suggestive: Boxes, baskets, pans, telescope, 
satchel, sled, bench, table, coffee-mill, trunk, book shelves, wheelbar- 
row, tent, vegetables, sprays of leaves, entire plants (root, stem, 
leaves, etc.,) flowers. 

FIFTH GBADE. 

HISTORY. 
First Term— Fall. 
Champlain, Hudson, John Smith, Sir Walter Raleigh. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Columbus, Magellan, Cortez. 

Third Term— Spring. 
The Pilgrims; Washington to Braddock's Defeat; Fremont, trip 
across plains and mountains to California in 1849. 

NATURE STUDY. 

First Term- Fall. 
Clam. Catfish. 
Apple. Plum. 
Migration of birds. Time. 
Steam engine. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Light and the eye. Eye of an ox. Human eye. 
The moon and its phases. Tides. 

The crust of the earth; geologic strata; pebbles; limestone; gran- 
ite; marble; gravel bank; gorge; erosion; glaciers; volcanoes; fossils. 

Third Term— Spring. 
Milkweed butterfly. 
Honey bee. 

Review of work of fourth grade in germination and budding of 
trees. See page 55. 

Hepatica and marsh-marigold. 

Blackbird. Bobwhite. 

Movements of the earth about the sun. 



58 Annual Catalogue 

READING FOR THE YEAR. 

Hiawatha, Parts I and II. Memorize selections. 
Ruskin's King- of the Golden River. 
Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome. 
Whittier's Barefoot Boy. 



GEOGRAPHY. 

First Term— Fall. 
Hudson river; Mt. Washington (White mountains): Boston (his- 
tory and commerce); a cotton mill at Lowell (Merrimac river); Ship 
building at Philadelphia (ship and navy yards). 

Second Term— Winter. 
Washington (national government); oyster fisheries of Chesa- 
peake bay (comp. Long Island Sound); James river and surface fea- 
tures of Virginia; the pineries of Carolina; the orange groves of 
Florida (comp. California). 

Third Term— Spring. 
The Alleghany mountains as a whole; New York city as a trade 
center; a gold mine in California; the salmon fisheries of the Colum- 
bia; the St. Lawrence river; City of Mexico (plateau and climate); 
the Rocky mountains as a whole; the river systems and slopes of North 
America. 

ARITHMETIC FOR THE YEAR. 
Factoring; least common multiple; cancellation; common and 
decimal fractions. 

Cook and Cropsey, pp. 224-267. 

LANGUAGE— SPELLING— WRITING. 
Continuation of work of Third and Fourth Grades. See Third 
Grade. 

DRAWING FOR THE YEAR. 
Perspective of both curved and straight edged objects. (See 
Third and Fourth Grades). Development of exact work. Artistic 
handling. Much outdoor sketching. Development of first expression 
in light and shade. 



Illinois Slate 'Normal University. 59 

Grammar and Preparatory Department. 



The Grammar School is intended for those who wish to prepare 
for the Normal School, for a High School, or for general business. 

Young men and young women not fully prepared for the Normal 
Department are enabled to enter after spending a term or two in the 
rigorous preparatory drill of the Grammar School; while to those 
who are preparing for a High School, it offers excellent academic 
training. It is in the direct charge of a Principal, and his assistant 
teachers are under the constant supervision of the Principal Train- 
ing Teacher. 

Pupils often fail in their effort to get a higher education, simply 
because their elementary education has been poor; hence, great care 
is taken that each shall be well-grounded in elementary knowledge. 

Those who wish merely a common-school education will find the 
course comprehensive enough for all ordinary business purposes. 
Much care is taken that pupils shall become good penmen, and that 
they shall acquire a ready knowledge of arithmetic, in order that 
they may make good accountants. Those more advanced will have 
the opportunity of studying bookkeeping, taught according to the 
most practical methods. 

The grading is such that pupils may take the work which they are 
best fitted to do; and, during the second year, those who may wisely 
do so are allowed to take any of the languages in the Normal School, 

The moral influence of the school and its surroundings is good. 
Vicious boys who are outcasts from other schools will not find admit- 
tance here. Saloons and other places of evil resort are not allowed 
in the town. Tuition is charged at the rate of $25 a year. 

SIXTH GBADE. 

HISTORY. 
First Term— Fall. 
Colonial History— Massachusetts and Virginia. Biographies of 
Miles Standish, Raleigh, and John Smith. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Colonial History— New York and the Iroquois; Pennsylvania and 
Maryland. Biographies of Stuyvesant, Franklin, and William Penn. 

Third Term— Spring. 
Colonial History — Georgia (Oglethorpe). Review of three type 
colonies. French and Indian wars. Washington and Braddock. 



60 Annual Catalogue 

NATURAL SCIENCE. 
First Term— Fall. 
Study of seeds and fruits and the preparation of plants and ani- 
mals for winter. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Experiments in condensation and evaporation. 
Application to physical geography. 
Erosion in various forms. 
World water partings. 
World river basins. 
World river systems. 

Third Term— Spring. 
Animal life of brooks, — lish, frogs, reptiles; germination spring 
flora. 

READING. 
First Term— Fall. 
Courtship of Miles Standish. Autobiography of Franklin. 

Second Term- -Winter. 
Legend of Sleepy Hollow. 
Snow Bound. 

Third Term— Spring. 
Evangeline. 

Burrough's Birds and Bees. 

Vocal and phonic drill throughout the year to meet the needs of 
the class. 

GEOGRAPHY. 
First Term— Fall. 

The World Whole — Position, shape, and area of continents- 
Long and short slopes. Primary and secondary highlands. River 
basins, general appearance and character. Formation of mountains. 
Origin of soils. General ideas of a river as to origin, as a carrier of 
soil and leveler, as to formation of deltas and lakes in river valleys. 
Work based on direct observation of home water courses. 

Collateral reading: Frye's Brooks and Brook Basins: Jane An- 
drew's Seven Little Sisters, and Each and All. 

Second Term -Winter. 
North America.— Review of slopes, highlands and river-basins as 
presented in preceding term. Careful study of North America ;is a 
type for study of continents. Continental divide. Long and short 



Illinois State Normal University. 61 

slopes. Mountain ranges, height and character. Plateaus. Close 
study of Great Basin and of Colorado and Columbia Plateaus. Close 
study of Mississippi, MacKenzie, St. Lawrence, Colorado, and Yukon 
basins. The Ice Sheet and the formation of the Great Lakes. Climate, 
vegetation, animals and industries. Chalk modeling and sand mod- 
eling. 

Third Term— Spring. 
South America. — Structure and relief compared with North 
America. Study South America in general according to plan sug- 
gested above for North America. Sand and chalk as above. 

ARITHMETIC. 
First Term— Spring. 
Percentage and its simple applications. 
Complete Cook & Cropsey's Elementary Arithmetic. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Review fractions and compound numbers. 
Analysis of miscellaneous problems. 

Third Term— Spring. 
Review percentage with fuller work in applications. Metric 
System. 

LANGUAGE-SPELLING-WRITING. 
Continuation of the work outlined for third grade. See page 51. 

DRAWING FOR YEAR. 
Continuation of studies in form, light and shade and perspective 
as in 3d, 4th, and 5th grades. Outdoor and indoor sketching. Color 
work in spring. Selections as before. 



SEVENTH GRADE. 
HISTORY. 
First Term— Fall. 
Revolutionary War — Biographies. 

Second Term— Winter. 
From the Revolutionary War to the Close of the War of 1812. 
Framing of Constitution. Northwest Territory. Biographies of 
Adams, Jefferson, and Madison, 



62 Annual Catalogue 

Third Term— Spring. 
Tariff and state's rights. Slavery question. Mexican war. Ter- 
ritorial growth. War for the Union. Biographies of Lincoln, Lee, 
and Grant. 

NATURAL SCIENCE. 

First Term— Fall. 
Physiology — Circulation, respiration, digestion, effects of alcohol 
and narcotics. 

Second Term— Winter. 

Heat — Convection and radiation. 
Air pressure. 

Third Term— Spring. 

Study of Type Trees— Maple. 

Birds — Woodpecker, bluejay, wild pigeon, blackbird. 

READING. 
First Term— Fall. 
Study of national poems bearing on history work, as Paul Re- 
vere's Ride, Lexington, Ballad of the Boston Tea Party. 
Selections from Lamb's Tales of Shakespeare. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Hale's Man Without a Country. 
Hawthorne's Tales of the White Hills. 
Andrew's Ten Boy's on the Road from Long ago to Now. 

Third Term— Spring. 
Scott's Lady of the Lake. 
Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal. 
Burrough's Birds and Bees. 
For phonic and vocal drill see sixth grade. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

Fall and Winter Term. 

Europe and Asia as a whole. Trend of continental axis, long and 

short slopes. Basins of the Rhine, Rhone, Danube, Volga, Indus, 

Yankste, Hoang, Lena and Yenesei. Relation of relief to climate, 

soil, vegetation and industries. Much use of sand, chalk, and flour 

modeling. 

Spring Term. 

Africa and the islands of the sea. Use outline suggested for 
North America; see work for sixth grade. 



Illinois State Normal University. 63 

MATHEMATICS. 
Fall Term.' 
Hornbrook's Geometry to p. 88. 

Lines and angles, circles, arcs and angles, rectangles, triangles, 
and lines. 

Winter Term. 
Finish Hornbrook's Geometr}'. Quadrilaterals, ratio and propor- 
tion, polygons, circles and lines, squares and cubes. 

Third Term— Spring. 
Arithmetic— More difficult applications of percentage. Cook & 
Cropsey's New Advanced Arithmetic, pp. 224 to 305. 

LANGUAGE FOR THE YEAR. 
Fall and winter terms devoted to technical grammar from a text 
book (Southworth and Goddard, to p. 155). Frequent essays on topics 
of history, science, literature, and geography. Oral and written re- 
productions of short poems. Spring term devoted chiefly to language 
work in connection with nature study. Spelling and writing as before. 

DRAWING. 
Continuation of work of sixth grade, with more difficult studies. 



EIGHTH GRADE. 

HISTORY. 
First Term— Fall. 
English History — The Teutons, Feudalism, Magna Chart a, Ren- 
aissance, Discovery of America. 

Second Term— Winter. 
English History— Tudor period, period of discovery and explora- 
tion, colonization of America; House of Hanover and American Rev- 
olution. 

Third Term— Spring. 
Review American History in light of preceding English History; 
Critical period, growth and development of Union, War for Union, 
reconstruction and later development. 

NATURAL SCIENCE. 
First Term— Fall. 
Air — Elasticity, expansion, air currents, air pressure, barometer. 
Manual work in application of scientific principles; construction of 
pump and barometer. Or 



64 Annual Catalogue 

Heat— Evaporation, condensation, construction of steam engine, 
study of thermometers. 

Second Term — Winter. 
Magnetism and Electricity. Construction of electric bell system; 
telephone and telegraph. 

Third Term— Spring. 
Type trees— Austrian Pine. 
Spring flowers — Fertilization and germination. 

READING FOR THE YEAR. 

Scott's Ivanhoe and Kenilworth, Rolfe's Tales from English His- 
tory in Prose and Verse, Emerson's Fortune of the Republic, Burke's 
American Orations, Lincoln's Gettysburg Speech. Short poetical 
selections, as the Launching of the Ship, bearing on history. 

For phonic and vocal drill see sixth grade. 

MATHEMATICS. 
First Term— Fall. 
Algebra— Giffin's Grammar School Algebra, to page 52. 
Exercise in algebraic language. Addition, subtraction, multipli- 
cation and division. Simple equations. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Finish Giffin's Grammar School Algebra. 

Third Term— Spring. 
Arithmetic— Review percentage and applications; involution, 
evolution, and mensuration. Finish Cook & Cropsey's New Advanced 
Arithmetic. 

LATIN OR GRAMMAR FOR THE YEAR. 

In this year Latin is accepted as an alternative for grammar 
from those who desire to begin Latin at this time in order to be bet- 
ter prepared for High School or Normal work. 

Latin— Fall term to p. 67, winter term to p. 125, spring term to the 
end of Collar & Daniell's First Latin Book. 

Grammar for Pall and Winter terms: Continuation of seventh 
grade work. Complete Southworth and Goddard. Spring term de- 
voted to essay work. 

DRAWING FOR YKAK. 
Continuation of work for seventh grade. Ten and ink work. 



Illinois State Normal University. 65 

NINTH GBADE. FlliST YEAR HIGH SCHOOL. 

Pupils entering this grade are allowed to complete a regular high 
school course in the Normal department if they so desire. 



LATIN FOR THE YEAR. 

See page 42 in this catalog. 

MATHEMATICS. 
First and Second Terms— Fall and Winter. 
Algebra. ' See Normal Course. 

Third Term— Spring. 
Review of Arithmetic. Time and topics determined by the needs 
of the class. 

LITERATURE. 
First Term— Fall. 
Seven American Classics. Thought and interpretation empha- 
sized; daily practice in oral reading to cultivate ease, flexibility, and 
naturalness in expression. 

Second Term— Winter. 
Tales of a Wayside Inn. Longfellow's preparation for this work. 
The characters of the introduction. Paul Revere's Ride, Student's 
Tale, The Falcon of Sir Frederigo, Robert of Sicily, Saga of King 
Olaf. 

Third Term— Spring. 

Masterpieces of British Literature. Treatment as before. Oc- 
casional essays in connection with the selections. 

SCIENCE. 
First Term— Fall. 
Heat, air, and water, with special reference to their bearings on 
the problems of physical geography. Daily work in the laboratory. 

Second Term— Winter. 

Brief survey of typical vertebrate structures. 

The cell, independently and as a basis of organic life. Lower 
many-celled animals: Starfish, jellyfish. Dissection of the oyster. 
Mollusca and insecta characterized in general. The lobster, cray- 
fish and perch, as types, with dissection. Observations recorded. 



6G Annual Catalogue 

Third Term— Spring. 
Seeds — Kinds and characteristics. Covering- and protection. 
Modes of dissemination. 

Stems — Kinds and structure. 

Buds — Kinds, structure, arrangement. 

Flowers and fruits. 

Drawing's and recording of observations. 



Preparatory Department. 



The work of this department, which is connected with the Gram- 
mar department, is designed especially for those who need a special 
preparation before entering the Normal department. 

LITERATURE AND READING. 
Seven American Classics: Snow Bound, Evangeline, Vhion of Sir 
Launfal. Special attention to thought and interpretation and to good 
habits of enuciation and expression in reading. Phonic and vocal 
work to meet the needs of the class. 

GEOGRAPHY. 
North America. Relief as basis of study: Slope the unit of 
relief; mountain ranges and plateaus compared as to altitude and 
area; effect of same on climate, vegetation and industries. Drainage 
of continent. Comparison of river systems and basins. 

SCIENCE. 
Correlated with geography. Problems from heat, air, and water. 
In the spring, seeds and the trees of the campus. 

ARITHMETIC. 
Common and decimal fractions, compound numbers, percentage. 
Careful work in analysis and oral and written expression. 

GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION. 
Themes from the work in Literature, Science, and Geography. 
I'm pose, facility in the use of clear, correct English, both oral and 
written. Attention to thought, organization, and paragraphing as 
preparation for composition. 

WRITING. 
Fifteen minutes daily instruction in vertical script, 



Illinois State Normal University. 



67 



The Two- Year Course. 

Graduates of approved high schools, or persons possessing 
alent qualifications, will be admitted to the following course: 



equiv- 



FIRST YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Reading", 18 hours per month. 
Arithmetic, 18 hours per month. 
Elementary Psychology, 18hours 

per month. 
Zoology, 18 hours per month. 
Elements of Pedagogy, 8 hours 

per month. 
Drawing, 8 hours per month. 

SECOND TERM. 

Pedagogy, 18 hours per month. 
English Grammar, 18 hours per 

month. 
Geography, 18 hours per month. 
Ancient History, 18 hours per 

month. 
Drawing, 8 hours per month. 
Practice Teaching, 20 hours per 

month. 

THIRD TERM. 

Pedagogy, 18 hours per month. 
English Literature, 18 hours per 

month. 
Algebra, 18 hours per month. 
Botany, 18 hours per month. 
Practice Teaching, 20 hours per 

month. 
Drawing, 8 hours per month. 
Vocal Music, 8 hours per month. 



SECOND YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Advanced Psychology, 20 hours 

per month. 
Illustrative Teaching 12 hours 

per month. 
English Literature, 20 hours per 

month. 
Civil Government, 18 hours per 

month. 
Physics, 20 hours per month. 

SECOND TERM. 

Advanced Psychology, 20 hours 

per month. 
Illustrative Teaching, 12 hours 

per month. 
Practice Teaching, 20 hours per 

month. 
Shakespeare and Themes, 20 

hours per month. 
Geometry, 18 hours per month. 

THIRD TERM. 

Philosophy of Education, 20 

hours per month. 
Illustrative Teaching, 12 hours 

per month. 
Practice Teaching, 20 hours per 

month. 
Physical Geography, 18 hours 

per month. 
Bookkeeping and School Law, 

20 hours per month. 



The two-year pupils recite with the three-year pupils. The ex- 
planation of the course of study, consequently, applies to both courses. 

A course in penmanship and vocal music is given in addition to 
the above. 



68 



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69 



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United States History. 

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Vergil or Science. 
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Practice Teaching. 
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Elementary Psychology. 


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Physics. 
Ps3 7 chology. 
Pedagogy, 3 hours a week. 




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Annual Catalogue 
The Christian Associations. 



There are two such societies, one for young men, Y.M.C.A ; and 
one for young women, Y.W.C.A. While they are separate organiza- 
tions, union meetings are regularly held. As their name implies, 
they are Christian associations. All members of evangelical churches 
may become active members, while others may become associate 
members. 

The work of these associations is many-sided, including religious 
devotion, instruction and study, missionary work, social culture, and 
the furtherance of religious culture and work along all 'lines. On the 
one side the body of students has in these societies the best opportu- 
nity for religious growth, organization, and social contact, and on 
the other the Sunday schools and churches are reinforced by the 
work of the societies. 

The devotional meetings consist of prayer meetings, held each 
Tuesday evening by each of the associations, and a union meeting of 
the two each Sunday afternoon at four o'clock. The Tuesday evening 
meetings are conducted by the students, while the Sunday afternoon 
meetings are led sometimes by the pastors of the churches, some- 
times by teachers or students of the Normal school. 

The Bible-study class meets each Friday evening. For some years 
it has been conducted by Dr. E. C. Hewett, ex-President of the Nor- 
mal School. It consists of a careful and comparative study of the 
Bible testimony or important religious topics. 

The sociables given near the opening of each term furnish oppor- 
tunity to the new students to become acquainted with each other and 
with older students, thus introducing them to the religious and social 
life of the school. 

The associations cultivate systematically the mission spirit, and 
carry on some of its work. The students raise annually three hundred 
dollars with which, in co-operation with five of the churches in the 
town, live native missionaries are supported in foreign fields. A stu- 
dents" volunteer band is made up of those who intend eventually to 
enter upon the work in foreign fields. A missionary study class meets 
each Friday afternoon. The library of the Normal School has also 
been supplied; through the efforts of the association, with a collec- 
tion of forty-five volumes of missionary literature. 

Students are welcomed at all the meetings of the associations, 
and to Ltfl opportunities for religious devotion and culture. 



Illinois State Normal University. 71 

The Oratorical Association. 



This association had its origin in the winter term of 1889, the 
prime mover being" Mr. Charles Beach, an enterprising student. 
Annual contests were held until the last school year when the 
association sent a representative to a meeting of delegates from the 
Normal schools of Kansas, Iowa, Illinois, and Missouri, who met for 
the purpose of organizing an Inter-State League of Normal Schools. 
As a result of that meeting an association was formed and the first 
oratorical contest was held at Warrensburg, Mo., May 8, 1896. 

Five States sent contestants, viz: Wisconsin, Kansas, Illinois, 
Iowa, Missouri. The honors were awarded in the order named. The 
contestant from Illinois was Robert J. Wells, a student in this school. 
Although Mr. Beach left the school several years ago, his interest 
in the association is evinced by the fact that he has made provision 
for an annual prize of one hundred dollars and a gold medal for the 
winner of the preliminary contest, the same to be known as the 
Beach prize. 

The second contest was held at Emporia, May 7, the same States 
sending contestants. Illinois was represented by Chester M. Echols. 
The rank of the contestants was as follows: Iowa, Missouri, Illinois, 
Wisconsin, Kansas. 



Accredited High Schools. 



Graduates of accredited high schools may be admitted to the 
two-year course upon presentation of their diplomas. School author- 
ities desiring to have their school placed upon this list should corre- 
spond with the president. The course should be not less than four 
years in-length. 



The University of Illinois. 



Arrangements have been made by which graduates of this school 
will be admitted to the junior classes of the University of Illinois. 
Graduates from the four-year course and from the two-year course 
will be able to get the degree of A.B. or B.S. at the end of two years 
at the University. Graduates of the three-year course will be credited 
with sufficient work to enable them to rank as juniors in courses lead- 
ing to the degree of B.S. 



Annual Catalogue 



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26 




29 


30 


31 












27 


28 












Sept. 








i 





3 


4 


Men. 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 1 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




12 


13 


1 1 


15 


L6 


1; 


IS 




13 


1 1 


15 


1H 


17 


IS 


19 




19 


■Jd 


21 


.).) 


23 


21 


25 




20 


21 


22 


23 


21 


25 


26 




26 


27 


28 


29 


30 








27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






Oct. 












i 


2 


Apr. 












1 


2 




3 


1 


5 


'g 


7 


8 


9 




3 


"4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




in 


ll 


12 


[3 


14 


15 


16 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




i; 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




r; 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




•21 


25 


26 


2? 


28 


29 


30 




24 


25 


26 


■>', 


2S 


29 


30 




31 














May 
















Nov. 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


*6 


; 




■; 


8 


9 


Hi 


II 


12 


13 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


1 1 




1 1 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




15 


16 


17 


IS 


19 


20 


21 




■.'I 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


■'_', 




22 


23 


21 


25 


26 


27 


28 




28 


29 


30 












29 


30 


31 










Dec. 








i 


2 


3 


1 


June 








1 


2 


3 


1 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


II 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 




12 


13 


1 1 


15 


16 


i; 


IS 




12 


13 


1 1 


15 


16 


17 


IS 




19 


2(1 


21 


.i.j 


23 


24 


25 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


21 


25 




26 27 


28 29 


30 


31 




26 


2; 


28 


29 


30 







Calendar for 1897=98. 

The school year of 39 weeks is divided into three terms. 

The iirst term of 15 weeks begins on Monday, September 13, 1897, 
and closes on Thursday, December 23. Examinations at' the close of 
the term. Annual Contest of Literary Societies on Thursday even- 
ing, December 23. Semi-amiual meeting of the Board of Education 
on Wednesday, December 9. 

Vacation of one week. 

The second term begins on Monday, January 3, 1898, and closes on 
Thursday. March 24. Examinations at the end of the term. 

Vacal ion of one week. 

The third term begins on Monday, April 4, and closes on Wednes- 
day. .June 22. Examinations during the last week of the term. Annual 
meeting <>i the A.lumni June 22. Annual meeting of the Board of 
Education on Wednesday, June 22. Commencement exercises on 
Thursday, .1 line 2.'!. 

Vacal ion Of eleven weeks. 

The new school year opens on Monday, September 12, 1K!)7. 



Illinois State Normal University. 



7:: 



Pupil Teachers. 

1896=7. 



FIRST CLASS/ 



BAKER, CORA E. 
BAKER, ESTELLE K. 
BARRETT, MABEL. 
BLAND, HATTIE. 
BOYCE, EVA B. 
COOPER, ANNETTA B. 
COOPER, MABEL. 
DANIEL. OZELLO H. 
DARBY, GERTRUDE. 
EDMUNDS, ELMA R. 
EDWARDS, CARLIE. 
EMERY, FANNIE. 
FAIRFIELD, ETTA M. 
FARMER, HATTIE. 
FELTON, JESSIE. 
FENTON, GRACE. 
FLETCHER, MARY. 
FLINN, SARAH L. 
HALL, ELIZABETH. 
HAMBLIN, MRS. FRANK A. 
HIMES, ETTA A. 
HUNT, FANNIE FERN E. 



KERNS, CARRIE. 

KING, ANNA. 

LANGE, OTTILIE. 

LEE, EMMA L. 

LIGGITT, MYRTLE M. 

LURTON, BLANCHE. 

MICHAELIS, EDNA. 

MITCHELL, ANNA T. 

MIZE, EDITH. 

MOON, EVA. 

PHILLIPS, ALICE. 

PIKE, EFFIE. 

RHINESMITH, WILHELMINE. 

ROSS, SILVA. 

SCHLATTERER, LAURA. 

SIKKEMA, A. ALICE. 

SIMMONS, NORA M. 

SNELL, CLARA M. 

VAN HORN, MARGARET. 

WASHBURN, EMMA. 

WILLIAMS, JULIA. 



ALLEN, CHARLES. MARTIN, WM. WOODROW. 

CARSON, FRANKLIN B. MEZE, A. ROY. 

ECHOLS, CHESTER M. PATCH, FRED. 
ELLIOTT, CHARLES HERBERT. PERRY, BENJAMIN. 

HALL, JOHN ( '. PIKE, WALTER F. 

HOFF, GEORGE S. RISHEL, WARREN HALE. 

HUNT, GEORGE W. ULLENSVANG, MARTIN L. 

JOHNSON, RILEY O. WELLE3, WINTHROP S. 
McKINNEY, JOHN R. 



*The first list consists of those who have been in school during the year 1896-7' 
and have taught four full terms or more of approved work in the Practice School- 
Those of the second class have taught less than four terms, but at least three 
terms: those of the third class less than three terms, but at least two; and those 
of the fourth class less than two terms. 



Annual Catalogue 



SECOND CLASS. 



ANDERSON, EMMA. 
CAMPBELL, EVA L. 
COLBY, LYDIA. 
CORSON, MAUDE. 
CROUCH, RACHEL. 
DILLON, JESSIE M. 
HENAUGHAN, MARY. 
HUMPHREY, ANABEL. 
KAISER, WILHELMINE. 
McCREA. EDITH 
MARKEE, ALMA. 
PITTS, HENRIETTA. 

ASHWORTH, ARTHUR E. 
BAKER, GEORGE. 
BOWMAN, CHARLES T. 
EASTWOOD, BYRON E. 
HESS. ARDIE D. 
JOHNSON, JOHN T. 
PFINGSTEN, GEORGE F. 



PORTER, EVA A. 
RILEY, MRS. MAGGIE P. 
ROSE, BERNEICE. 
SCOTT, SADIE. 
SMITH, NANO P. 
STEVENSON, BESSIE B. 
STOWELL, GERTRUDE. 
SULLIVAN, MARY. 
THEIS, FLORA. 
THOMPSON, KATIE A. 
TRAVIS, CARRIE E. 

RUDOLPH, HENRY M. 
THAYER, WILLIAM. 
THOMPSON, FRANCIS. 
WAITS, H. E. 
WOLF, ALBERT E. 
YOUNG. NOAH A. 



THIRD CLASS. 



ADAMS, ELLA. 
ALTES, MARY. 
BLAIR, NETTIE M. 
CHICKEN, SAD A R. 
COWLES, BESSIE A. 
DAWSON, OLIVE L. 
DUNHAM, EVA M. 
EDMUNDS, LUCY. 
ELLIOTT, GEORGIA. 
FALCONER, 1 1 ATT IK J. 
FARMER, RHODA. 
FILE, NELLIE. 
FINCHAM, NELLIE. 
FRANK, MARGARET. 
FOLEY, MINERVA V. 
GASTMAN,MRS.CORA M JOHN 

8TON. 
HAMILTON. IX A E. 
HASBROUCK, MARY. 
Mice INS. MABEL A. 
HILTS, EPPIE. 



HITCHCOCK, ELIZABETH. 
HUNTING, OLIVE. 
JOHNSTON, J. WINIFRED. 
KIMBALL, LURA C. 
LA RUE, ORA. 
LESEM, JOSEPHINE. ' 
LONG, MRS. DORA B. 
LOVE, MARY. 
McCREA, IDA. 
McKINNEY, BERNEICE. 
McWHERTER, MARY. 
MERRIAM, NELLIE D. 
MILLER, LURA.- 
MOORE, HARRIET M. W. 
MORSE, KANNIE EDNA. 
NEUMAYER, LENA. 
NEWHALL, MARY. 
NIMMO, LIZZIE M. 
NORWOOD, MAN'. 
OXLEY, MARY. 
RAILSBACK, MRS. LILLIE 



Illinois State Normal University. 



75 



reno, cora. 
riggs, mrs. lillad. 
robinson, adeline, 
ropp, theresa, 
schickler, rosa, 
skillin, florence b. 
smi'll, lizzie e. 
ta vlor, helen m. 

borsch, charles j. 
crocker, william. 
dawson, russell, 
gunnell, o. j. 
kern, john w. 
Mcdonald, dalton. 

McINTYRE, GEO. W. 
PALMER, GEORGE M. 



TODD, FLORENCE. 
TRAVIS, ALIDA B. 

WASSON, FRANCES E. 
WHITE, DAISY P. 
WILSON, ESTELLE. 
WISE, ANNA. 
WRIGHT, EDNA MAY. 

PFEEFFER, FREDERICK. 
PRATT, LANSON H. 
PRICE, HOLLIS. 
READHEIMER, J. E. 
REECE, JOHN S. 
WILSON, GEORGE S. 
WILSON, JOHN T. 



FOURTH CLASS. 



ALBERTSON, SARAH. 
ANDREW, METTA. 
ANDREWS, MARGARET G. 
ARONSON, HILMA A. 
AUGUSTINE. ORA M. 
BABBS, MARY I. 
BAIRD, CLEMENTINE MAUD. 
BAIRD, MILDRED. 
BAIRD, TINA. 
BALDWIN, LETTA MAY. 
BARGER, HELEN M. 
BERRY, W. ELMA. 
BIEHL, CAROLENA W. 
BLAIR, EMILY. 
BOHRINGEPv, CORA L. 
BOSWORTH, MRS. ANNIE E. 
BOWMAN, FLORENCE M. 
BRACEY, ELIZABETH D. 
BRADLEY, CARRIE F. 
BURLINGAME, IDA M. 
BURNETT, LAURA. 
(ALLAN, CATHERINE. 
CARPENTER, KATIE. 
CARPENTER, MARY EMMA. 



CARTER, LUVICY. 
CHAMBERLAIN, L1NNIE. 
COOK, LORENA. 
COOPER, NANCY B. 
CRONIN, ANNA. 
DANIELS, LUCRETIA, E. 
DARRAH, MRS. ANNIE. 
DOLPH, ALICE A. 
EMINGER, CORA MAY. 
FALCONER, EMMA. 
FINCH, HELEN C. 
FLESCHER, IDA L. 
FOSTER, KATHLEEN L. 
FRANKLIN, LOIS G. 
GILBERT, BLANCHE. 
GRASSMANN, ADELAIDE. 
GVILLO, MAY. 
HALL, ARA B. 
HAMEL, A. CECILIA. 
HANCE, MILLIE B. N. 
HANDLIN, ADAH C. 
HARPOLE, EMMA. 
HAWKES, JESSIE B. 
HESS, RUTHA B. 



Annual Catalogue 



HITCHCOCK, MARY E. 
HOLDER, JESSIE. 
HOLLERING, TILLIE. 
HOLMES, EASTER M. 
HORNISH, LULU. 
HOWELL, MINNIE. 
HUSSEY, ANNA L. 
JACKSON, MAUDE. 
JOHNSON, BLANCHE. 
JOHNSTON. BERTHA H. 
JOHONNOT, KATHERINE. 
KEMPH, MARY. 
KINTZ, DAISY. 
KNOTT, ELIZABETH. 
KRAEGER, GRACE. 
KRAUSE, HETTIA. 
KREIS, IDA. 
KUMPF, ANNA C. 
LEE, EVA. GRACE. 
LELAND, ELLA POND. 
LENTZ, MARY. 
LESSLEY. MAE. 
LOVERING, HATTIE II. 
LYONS, ROSE LOUISE. 
McCALL, ADA. 
McCORD, GRACE A. 
McKINNEY, MARGARET M. 
MCNAUGHTON, MARTHIA M. 
MARSH, JENNIE M. 
MARTIN, PEARL B. 
MAYBACH, KM MA S. 
MILLER, JESSIE W. 
MILLS. BERTHA. 
MILLS, FLORA. 
MITTEN, RUTH E. 
MONROE, GRACE. 
MONTAGUE, BLANCHE E. 
NEEDHAM, BESSIE. 
NEELY, MARY ETTA. 
NEU, ELIZABETH A. 
NICOLLS, ELLEN A. 
NIXON. ISIDORE A. 
PATTERSON, ELSIE. 



PATTERSON, GERTRUDE. 
PATTERSON. LIDA McF. 
PATTERSON, MAUD. 
PEELER, LIZZIE, E. 
PORTER, ELIZA. 
PORTER, NELLIE. 
POTTER, EFFIE, X. 
PROTSMAN, PEARL E. 
RECORD. MAE E. 
REGENOLD, MABEL Z. 
REEDER, GRACE. 
RENICH, MARY. 
RICE, LENA H. 
RICKARDS. MARY. 
RILEY. MAUD. 
RYAN, CATHERINE. 
SALINE, EFFIE C. 
SCANLAN, LENA G. 
SCHEMPP, BERTHA. 
SCHNEIDER, MARY L. 
SEELEY, HELEN E. 
SEGUINE, NELLIE. 
SMITH, CORA D. 
SMITH, DAISY M. 
SMITH, KATE B. 
SMITH, MARGARET E. 
SMITH, LEILA H A. 
SNIDER, NELLIE M. 
SNYDER, NELLIE. 
STA I 'LETON, A LBERTA F. 
ST AVER, BERTHA. 
STOVER, TELMA. 
STRONG, FRANCES. 
STUBBLEFIELD, EDITH E. 
SYLVESTER, FLORENCE. 
TAYLOR, VIRGINIA. 
TRIMBLE, MARY S. 
TROXEL, MABEL. 
VAIL, JENNIE. 
VEACH, LUELLA. 
VOORHEES, LUCIA I. 
WALLACE, CAROLINE L. 
WALLACE, MARGARET. 



Illinois State Normal University. 



WALLING, MRS. ANNA. WHIGAM, JEAN. 

WALSH. MAMIE G. WILLIAMS, ELSIE. 

WALZ, EMMA. WILMER, ANNA. 

WAHNICK, ANNA A. WILSON, MAMIE EVA. 

W ATSON, ALICE P. WILSON, MAY. 

W EBSTER, N. GRACE. WILSON, THEODORA. 

W ENDLAND, ANNIE F. WORMLEY, BLANCHE. 

WHEELER, CORA. WORTH, CLEORA. 

WHEELER, MARY. YOUNG, GRACE H. 

BAKER, FRED A. MORRELL, JOHN F. 

BARGER, THOMAS M. MORTON, J. B. 

BENEDICT, WILLIAM A. MOULTON, GEORGE D. 

BENNETT, WILLIAM E. MYALL, CHARLES A. 

BOGGESS, ARTHUR M. MYERS, CHARLES O. 

BONNELL, CLARENCE. NAFFZIGER, SIMON EDW. 

CARROLL, FRED E. NORTON, ARCHIE. 

( JA VINS, STANLEY. PATTENGILL, IRA. 

COLEMAN, LYMAN H. PUFFER, WILFRED E. 

CONGER, GARY R. SOLOMON, GEORGE W. 

COOK, ISAAC. STEWART, FRANK. 

DEWHIRST, JOHN. STEWART, JOHN POQUE. 

EDMUNDS, HAROLD. STOKES, GEORGE C. 

FLENTJE, LEWIS E. TROXEL, CECIL W. 

GROSSCUP, LAWRENCE W. URBAN, HARVEY B. 
HAWKES, WILLIAM. WAKELAND, CHARLES R. 

HIETT, A. B. WALTER, HENRY. 

HIMES, ROBERT P. WALTERS, HENRY. 

KEINER, FREDERICK W. WHETSEL, J. C. 

LINDSEY, WYLLARD B. WHITE, ALBERT E. 

LUKE, EDWARD. WILSON, ARTHUR McC. 

MADDEN, GEORGE B. WILSON, FRANK L. 

McGUFFIN, RALPH. WORRELL, JOSEPH CARL. 

MILLER, HARRY E. WRIGHT, WILBUR H. 

MILLS, LEROY. WYND, ROBERT S. 

MINER, THOMAS D. YOUNG, JAMES W. 

MORGAN, ORA S. 

SUMMARY. 

Men. Women. Total 

First class 17 43 60 

Second class 13 23 36 

Third class 15 56 71 

Fourth class 53 153 206 

Total 98 275 373 



78 



Annual Catalogue 



Students, 



Post=Graduate and Special. 



NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE. 


Anderson, Emma Rachel 


(Iowa) 


Cedar ftajnds 


Barrett, Mabel Winslow 


McLean, 


Normal 


Bohringer, Cora Louise 


Whiteside, 


Morrison 


Clark, Lulu 


St Clair, 


Belleville 


Dawson, Olive Leonora 


Boone, 


Belvidere 


Dillon, Jessie M. 


McLean, 


Normal 


Farmer, Hattie E. 


(Nebraska) 


I&mball 


Gunsolus, Harriet 


Winnebago, 


Bockford 


Maybach, Emma Louise 


(Ohio) 


Dundee 


Patterson, Lida McFall 


Warren, 


Monmouth 


Rosenberry, Mrs. Flora 


Macon, 


Decatur 


Wendland, Annie F. 


(Arkansas) 


Helena 


Cowan, Alan DeWain 


Mason 


JSaston 


Dillon, Alpheus 


■ McLean, 


Normal 


Wright, Wilbur Hoyt 


Iroquois, 
Senior Class. 


Watseka 


Baker, Cora Ethel 


Shelby, 


Prairie Home 


Baker, Estelle Katherine 


St. Clair, 


Belleville 


Bland, Harriet 


Shelby, 


Shelbyville 


Boyce, Eva Belle 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Cooper, Mabel Anna 


Jo Daviess, 


Hanover 


Darby, Gertrude 


Sangamon, 


Springfield 


Fairfield, Etta Melissa 


McLean, 


Normal 


Felton, Jessie 


''McLean, 


Bloomington 


Fenton, Grace 


Vermilion, 


Danville 


Fletcher, .Mary 


Carroll, 


Millcdgeville 


Hall. Elizabeth Twining 


Mr Lean, 


Downs 



n'licsc ii;i iiks marked with a star are names <>r persons who have given their 
e of Intention to teacb and who are pursuing the regular Normal Coins.-; 
i. ut by reason of residence in McLean count v, or wishing to be free t<> teach in 
othei tatea 01 because not of legal age, thev have noi been admitted to the Nor- 
mal School as stale beneficiaries. They pay tuition as Model students, at ttie rate 
oi |32 a year. 



Illinois State Normal University. 



79 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Lee, Emma Louise Boone, 

Liggitt, Myrtle Margaret Livingston 

Lurton, Blanche Jersey, 

Michaelis, Edna Bell Hancock, 

Mitchell, Anna T. Sangamon, 

Mize, Edith Belle Madison, 

Moon, Eva Mary Douglas, 

Patterson, Elsie ^McLean, 

Phillips, Alice Frances Vermilion, 

Pike, Effie Madison, 

Rhinesmith, Wilhelmine Piatt, 

Schlatterer, Laura DeKaTb, 

Sikkema, Amelia Alice St. Clair, 

Simmons, Nora Mae Hancock, 

Stevenson, Bessie Bedell ^McLean, 

Washburn, Emma ^McLean, 

Carson, Franklin Benjamin Washington, 

Hall, John Calvin McLean, 

Harley, Joel Alva Jo Daviess, 

Holf, George Stephen Vermilion, 

Hunt, George Warren Fulton, 

Johnson, Riley Oren Coles, 

Patch, Fred Granville Warren, 

Perry, Benjamin Ford. 

Rishel, Warren Hale Stephenson, 

Thompson, Francis Perry, 

Ullensvang, Martin Lewis Lee, 

Welles, Winthrop Selden Champaign, 



POSTOFFICE. 

Clinton (Wis.) 

Nevada 

Neivbern 

Plymouth 

Springfield 

Manix 

Tuscola 

Normal 

Danville 

St. Jacobs 

Bement 

Sycamore 

Belleville 

Joetta 

Bloomington 

Bloomington 

liichview 

Downs 

Galena 

Danville 

Ipava 

Hindsboro 

Jioseville 

Melvin 

Lena 

Pinckneyville 

Steward 

Penfield 



Students Who Have Completed Two Years' Work or More. 



Adams, Ella Sarah Jefferson, 

Aldrich, Blanche McLean, 

Biehl, Carolena Wilhelmina Douglas, 

Blair, M. Nette Tazcivell, 

Broadhead, Annie Maple Tazewell, 

Campbell, Eva Lorena Fulton, 

Chicken, Sada Rosanna Woodford, 

Cleveland, Lida McLean, 

Colby, Lydia Henry, 

Cooper, Annetta Belle McLean, 

Corson, Maude McLean, 

Cowles, Bessie Abiah J\.ankakee, 



Opdyke 

Normal 

Camargo 

Mackinaw 

Mackinaw 

Lewistown 

Secor 

Normcd 

Atkinson 

Normal 

Normal 

Kankakee 



80 



Annual ( 'atalogue 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Crouch, Rachel Pierson Henderson, 

Edmunds, Lucy Grundy, 

Edwards, Carlie Anne McLean, 

Emery, Fannie Christian, 

Fairfield, Grace McLean, 

Fincham, Nellie McLean, 

Fleischer, Ida Lena McLean, 

Flinn, Sarah Louvilla Christian, 

Foley, Minerva Vian LaSalle, 

Foster, Kathleen Lorena McLean, 

Hamblin, Mrs. Frank A. Knox, 

Hilts, Effie McLean, 

Himes, Etta Abigail McLean, 

Hitchcock, Elizabeth McLean, 

Hitchcock, Mary Ella McLean, 

Humphrey, Anabel McLean, 

Hunting-, Olive McLean, 

Kaiser, Wilhelmine Piatt, 

Kerns, Carrie Iroquois, 

King-, Anna T. Bichland, 

Knott, Elizabeth '-'McLean, 

Lentz, Mary Stephenson, 

Love, Mary Jean Ogle, 

Langc, Ottilie Meta McLean, 

McWherter, May Edith Bo«d, 

Monroe, Grace Adela McLean, 

Morse, Fannie Edna Lake, 

M oulton, Julia Kt ndall, 

Nimrno, Lizzie Maude Livingston, 

Pitts, Henrietta Betsey *McLean, 

Porter, Eva Amanda LaSalle, 

Ritfgs, Mrs. Lilla Belle *McLean, 

I Joss. Silva Macon, 

Scott, Sarah Ilachel Ogle, 

Smith, Lucretia Mott PiCtnam, 

Smith, Nano Pearl Ogle, 

Smull, Lizzie Eleanor Macon, 

Snell, Clara May Carroll, 

Sullivan, Mary Kllen McLean, 

Taylor, Belen Mary McLean, 

Thompson, Katie Alice Jo Daviess, 

Travis, Alida Belle .shell,,/, 



POSTOFFICE. 

Bosetta 
Oardm r 

Normal 
Taylorville 

Normal 
Towanda 

Normal 
Pan a 

LaSalle 

Nor /mil 

Galesburg 
Towanda 

Normal 

Norm <il 

Normal 

Towanda 

Normal 

Alwood 

Onarga 

Olney 

Normal 

Freeport 

Byron 

Bloomington 

Sorento 

Leroy 

Gihner 

Pavilion 

Fairbury 

Bloomington 

Strcator 

Bloomington 

Argenta 

Elida 

Mt. Palatine 

Creston 

Macon 

Milledgeville 

Bloomington 

Bloomington 

Apple Hirer 

Prarie Home 



Illinois State Normal University. 



81 



NAMES. 

Travis, Carrie Estclla 
Watson, Alice Perle 
Williams. .lulia 
Wilmer, Anna Elizabeth 

Allen, Charles Henry 
Allen, Walter Harry 
Ashworth, Arthur Elmer 
Baker, George Lee 
Bowman, Charles Thomas 
Bright, Bruce 
Burtis, Clyde Lewis 
Clark, Samuel C. 
Coleman, Lyman H. 
Covey, Hyatt Elmer 
Covvies, Robert Andrew 
Crocker, William 
Dawson, Russel 
Eastwood, Byron Evans 
Echols, Chester Madison 
Edmunds, Harold 
Elliott, Charles Herbert 
Gunnell, Orville James 
Johnson, John Thomas 
Johnston, Milford L. 
Kern, John Winfred 
Mclntyre, George Washington 
McKinney, John R. 
McMurry, Karl Franklin 
Marquis, Chester Dubois 
Martin, William Woodrow 
Mize, Addison Roy 
Moulton, George Dykeman 
Pike, Walter Franklin 
Pratt, Lanson Henry 
Pricer, John Lossen 
Pattingill, Ira 

Pnngsten, George Frederick 
Rudolph, Henry Madison 
Stevenson, Ralph Ewing 
Stewart, Frank 
Stewart, John Pogue 
Stokes, George Curran 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE. 


Shelby, 


Prairie Home 


Pike, 


Griggsville 


(Missouri) 


Hannibal 


Shelby, 


Oconee 


Shelby, 


Oconee 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


Pope, 


Golconda 


Shelby, 


Lakewood 


*McLean, 


Normal 


*McLean, 


Hudson 


Edgar, 


Chrisman 


DeKalb, 


Sandwich 


*McLean, 


Bloomington 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Macon, 


Blue Mound 


Woodford, 


ElPaso 


Lee, 


Franklin Grove 


Hamilton, 


McLeansboro 


Grundy, 


Gardner 


St. Clair, 


Belleville 


' yc McLean, 


Normal 


Perry, 


DuQuoin 


^McLean, 


Bloomington 


Moultrie, 


Gays 


Tazewell, 


Tremont 


Christian, 


Assumption 


McLean, 


Normal 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Tazewell, 


Green Valley 


Madison, 


Manix 


Kendall, 


Pavilion 


Madison, 


St. Jacobs 


Tazewell, 


Delavan 


Vermilion, 


Muncie 


Shelby, 


Oconee 


St. Clair, 


Millstadt 


Champaign, 


Ludloio 


* McLean, 


Bl 'Omington 


Crawford, 


Oblong 


Henderson, 


Biggsville 


Kankakee, 


Kankakee 



82 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. 

Thayer, William John 
Waits, Harmon Bert 
W T ilson, George Shirley 
Wilson, John Thomas 
Wolfe, Albert Benedict 
Young, Noah A. 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE. 


Ford, 


Sibley 


Perry, 


Tamaroa 


Putnam, 


Magnolia 


Piatt, 


Deland 


Bureau, 


Arlington 


Vermilion, 


Bismark 



Students Who Have Completed One Year's Work or flore, But 
Not Two Years. 

Adams, Harriet Elizabeth 

Altes, Mary 

Aronson, Hilma Augusta 

Babbs, Mary Irene 

Baird, Clementina Maude 

Barber, Cora 

Barth, Mary Elizabeth 

Beam, Grace Elva 

Berry, Willis Elma 

Birckett, Bessie Bird Ellen 

Blair, Emily 

Blakley, Jessie Isabelle 

Bosworth, Mrs. Annie Elizabeth 

Bowman, Florence Margaret 

Bracey, Elizabeth M. 

Bright, Bernice Alena 

Burlingame, Ida May 

Burnett, Laura May 

Callan Catharine 

Campbell, Martha P. 

Carpenter, Charlotte Evaline 

Carpenter, Mary Emma 

Carter, Luvicy Elizabeth 

Clancey, Nellie Gertrude 

Clark, Caroline Irving 

( look, ( Jarrie Estella 

('ook, Lor en a 

Coriell, Ada 

Cox, Theresa Kebekah 

Cronin, Anna 

Daniel, O/.cl Lo I larriet 

Davenporl . I lertha Lea 

Davenport, Lulu Lea 



Hancock, 


Bowen 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Mercer, 


Aledo 


Coles, 


Fair Grange 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Carroll, 


Milledgeville 


Stark, 


Wyoming 


Warren, 


Boseville 


Pike, 


Pleasant Hill 


Wayne, 


Marion 


Tazewell, 


Velavan 


Mercer, 


Preemption 


Cook, 


Fvanston 


McHenry, 


Harvard 


Woodford, 


Lota Point 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Tazewell, 


Delavan 


Champaign, 


Villa Grove 


Kane, 


Aurora 


*Fulton, 


Lewistown 


Lee, 


Dixon 


Lee, 


Dixon 


Madison, 


Collinsville 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


(Arkansas) 


Helena 


McLean, 


Danvers 


Pnllon, 


Fairvievo 


McLean, 


Normal 


LaSalle, 


Peru 


< 7/ ristian, 


Assumption 


St. < 'lair, 


Belleville 


.Will, 


Joliet 


Will, 


Jolkt 



Illinois State Normal University. 



83 



NAMES. 

Dillon, Mertie May 

Dolph, Alice Amelia 

Dunham, Eva Myrtle 

Edmunds, Elma Ruth 

Elliott, Georgia 

Falconer, Emma Victoria 

Falconer, Hattie Josephine 

Farmer, Rhoda Saletha 

File, Nellie 

Fisher, Mary Elizabeth 

Frank, Margaret Julia 

Franklin, Lois Gertrude 

Garwood, Anna 

Gastman, Mrs. Cora M. Johnson 

Grassman, Addie 

Gray, Jessie Fenton 

Gvillo, May 

Hallock, Minnie Juiina 

Hamel, Adeline Cecelia 

Hamilton, Ina Estelle 

Harpole, Emma 

Hasbrouck, Mary 

Hawkes, Jessie Belle 

Hazen, Minnie Amy 

Henaughan, Mary Ellen 

Henaughan, Nora 

Higgins, Mabel, Acqua 

Hiltabrand, Jennie Elizabeth 

Holder, Jessie M. 

Hollering, Tillie 

Hornish, Lulu Elizabeth 

Howell, Minnie 

Hummel, Ida Rose 

Hummel, Sarah Matilda 

Hunt, Fannie Fern Emily 

Hussey, Anna Laura 

Ingels, Lou Carrie 

Irwin, Clara May 

Jackson, Maude 

Jacob, Mrs. Ella Leone 

Johnston, Bertha Helen 

Johnston, Elizabeth Jane 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE. 


McLean, 


Normal 


Kendall, 


Piano 


Macon, 


Decatur 


Grundy, 


Gardner 


Macon, 


Decatur 


Macon, 


Decatur 


Macon, 


Decatur 


Marion, 


Patoka 


31acon, 


Decatur 


Piatt, 


Bement 


Whiteside, 


Sterling 


Livingston, 


Dwight 


Fulton, 


Ipava 


McLean, 


Hudson 


St. Clair, 


Belleville 


Mason, 


Havana 


Madison, 


Fosterburgh 


Stark, 


Osceola 


LaSalle, 


LaSalle 


McLean, 


Bloominqton 


White, 


Carmi 


Effingham, 


Effingham 


Kane, 


Aurora 


Woodford, 


El Paso 


Bichland, 


Olney 


Richland', 


Olney 


Kane, 


Elgin 


LaSalle, 


Lostant 


McLean, 


Normal 


Kane, 


Aurora 


Tazewell, 


Washington 


Schuyler, 


Bushville 


Ford, 


Boberts 


Ford, 


Bobdrts 


Jo Daviess, 


Hanover 


Sangamon, 


WilliamsviUe 


Cook, 


Chicago 


Logan, 


Beasqn 


Peoria, 


Brimfield 


( Washington) 


Pioneer 


Macon, 


Latham 


Sangamon, 


Illiopolis 



84 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Johnston, Julia Winifred Kane, 

Kemph, Mary Will, 

Kent, Bessie Grace McLean, 

Kerr, Fannie Vermilion, 

Kimball, Laura Caldwell Kane, 

Kintz, Daisy Maude ^McLean, 

Krafft, Ella Elsie St. Clair, 

Kreis, Ida McLean, 

Lane, Gilberttena Ogle, 

La Rue, Ora Coles, 

Lee, Eva Grace La Lalle, 

Leischner, Sallie Olive Piatt, 

Leland, Ella Pond Carroll, 

Lesem, Josephine Adams, 

Long", Mrs. Dora Besley McHenry, 

Lovering, Harriet Moulton Christian, 

Lynch, Elizabeth *(Iowa) 

Lyons, Mamie *McLean, 

Lyons, Rosa Louise Kane, 

McCall, Ada Victoria Johnson, 

McCord, Grace Amanda Putnam, 

Mc( 'rea, Edith Burlingame Ogle, 

McCrea, Ida Harkness Ogle, 

Mclntyre, Mary Evalin Warren, 

McKinney, Bernice Christian, 

McKinney, Margaret Mildred Christian, 

McLeod, Florence La Salle, 

McNamara, Mary Whiteside, 

McReynolds, Dora Moultrie, 

Markee, Alma Eugenia Bureau, 

Marshall, Jessie Wilson, Hamilton, 

Martin, Pearl Buckman Cool; 

Merker, Susie Macon, 

Merriam, Nellie Emily Logan, 

Miller, Jessie Winifred LaSalle, 

Miller, Lura May Cumberland, 

Mills, Bertha Evelyn Putnam, 

Mills. Edna Gertrude Putnam, 

Mills, Ida Estella Put nam, 

Mil ten, I Jul ii Emma LaSalle, 

Montgomery, I'll la I '.irk, Bock Island, 

Moore, Harriet May Wilson /\ane, 



POSTOFFICE. 

St. Charlei 

Alpine Heights 

Gridley 

Boss ri lie 

Elgin 

Bloomington 

Belleville 

Bloomington 

Iiochelle 

Etna 

Triumph 

De Land 

Lanark 

Quincy 

West McHenry 

Assumption 

Bedford 

Bloomington 

Aurora 

\'/l IIIKI 

Granville 

Crcston 

Creston 

lurk wood 

Assumption 

Assumption 

Men dot a 

Prophctstown 

Bethany 

Neponset 

McLeanshoro 

Harvey 

Emery 

Atlanta 

Mendota 

Toledo 

Clear Cr<<k 

Clear Creek 

.]//. Palatine 

Troy Grove 

Reynolds 

Elgin 



Illinois State Normal University. 



85 



NAMES. 

Morgan, Mattie 
Morris, Daisy Alice 
Morse, Helen Sophronia 
Morse, Zoa Bertha 
Neu, E'izabeth Augusta, 
Neumayer, Lena 
Newhall, Mary Susan, 
Nicolls, Ellen Adelma 
Nixon, Isidore Alice 
Norwood, May 
Obenshain, Dorothy 
Oxley, Mary Delima 
Parkinson, Mae E. 
Patterson, Maude El ma 
Peeler, Lizzie E. 
Porter Eliza Wolfe, 
Porter, Nellie 
Potter, Effie Ximena 
Price, Grace Eva 
Quigg, Etta Grace 
Railsback, Mrs. Lillie 
Record, Mae Emerson, 
Reeder, Grace 
Regenold, Mabel Zoe 
Renich, Mary Emma 
Reno, Cora Lorena 
Renshaw, Jennie 
Rice, Lena Henrietta 
Rickards, Mary Amelia 
Riley, Mrs. Maggie P. 
Riley, Maude Emmarilla 
Robinson, Adaline Brown 
Rodgers, Clara Mabel 
Ropp, Theresa 
Rose, Berneice Evangeline 
Saline, Effie Cecelia 
Scanlan, Lena Gertrude 
Schempp, Berlha 
Schickler, Rose Mathilda 
Schneider, Mary Lizzie 
Seeley, Helen Edna 
Seguine, Nellie 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE. 


Shelby', 


Oconee 


* McLean, 


Leroy 


Hlallatin, 


Shawneetown 


Lake, 


Gilmer 


Christian, 


Pana 


Kane, 


Aurora 


Kane, 


Aurora 


Cumberland, 


Toledo 


DeWitt, 


Clinton 


Peoria, 


Hat 'kefs Corn ers 


McLean, 


Bhomington 


Marion, 


Centralia 


Marshall, 


Wenona 


Pike, 


Pearl 


* McLean, 


Normal 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Winnebago, 


liockford 


Putnam, 


Mt. Palatine 


Tazewell, 


Minier 


McLean, 


Normal 


Coles, 


Charleston 


McLean, 


Normal 


Putnam, 


Florid 


Mc Henry, 


Woodstock 


Hancock, 


Augusta 


Fulton, 


Table Grove 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Marlon, 


Centralia 


McLean, 


Normal 


Kane, 


Aurora 


Kane, 


Elgin 


Sangamon, 


Biverton 


Cook, 


Irving Park 


Whiteside, 


Prophetstown 


La Salle, 


Mendota 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


LaSalle, 


Troy Grove 


Kane, 


Aurora 


Kane, 


Elburn 


Schuyler, 


Littleton 


Bureau, 


Buda 



86 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. COUNTY. POSTOFFICE. 

Simmons, Margaret Miranda Hancock, Fountain Green 

Sitherwood, Grace *McLean, Bloomington 

Skillin, Florence Bessie Cook, Oak Park 

Smith, Cora Dean Moultrie, Lake City 

Smith, Leilah Augusta Macon, Maroa 

Snyder, Nellie Elise LaSalle, Peru 

Stapleton, Alberta Flora Christian, Assumption 

Stover, Zelma Etta Schuyler, Bushville 

Stowell, Gertrude Maria McLean, Bloomington 

Strong", Frances Warren, Boseville 

Taliaferro, Sallie Mac Warren, Boseville 

Theis, Flora McLean, Bloomington 

Todd, Florence Louise Kane, Aurora 

Trimble, Clara E. Tazewell, Tremont 

Trimble, Mary Lillian Tazewell, Tremont 

Unangst, Mabel Alicia Stephenson, Cockrell 

Vail, Fannie Jane Henry, Geneseo 

Van Horn, Margaret Tazewell, Pekin 

Veach, Luella Hancock, Bentley 

Voorhees, Lucia Isabella Stark, Wyoming 

Wahl, Nettie May Whiteside, Sterling 

Wallace, Caroline Louise Madison, Alton 

Walling, Mrs. Annie Senteney Douejlas, Areola 

Wasson, Frances Ella Edgar, Logan 

AVebster, Nellie Grace Iroquois, Woodland 

Wells, Mary Johnston Macon, Elwin 

Wheeler, Cora Blanche Pike, Milton 

Whigam, Jean Gertrude Lake, Aplakisic 

White, Daisy Paota Ogle, Stillman Valley 

White. Millie Esther Coles, Charleston 

Wilkerson, Anna Agnes Woodford, Seccr 

Williams, Elsie Douglas, Tuscola 

Williams, Mary Bradford Kendall, Yorkville 

Wilson, Estelle May Woodford, Secor 

Wilson, May Annetta Shelby, Shelbyville 

Wise; Anna Will, Joliet 

Worinley, Blanche De Kalb, Shabbona 

Wright, Edna May Iroquois, Watseka 

Young, Grace Harriet Montgomery, Jlillsboro 

Barker, Thomas M. McLean, Normal 

Beam, Walter Henry Warren, Roseville 

Benedict, William Alfred Kankakee, Waldron 



Illinois State Normal University. 



87 



NAMES. 

Bloomer, James Ward 
Boggess, Arthur 
Borsch, Charles Joseph, 
Burtis, Guy Seaman 
Carroll, Fred Ellis 
Cassaday, William Henry 
Cavins, Stanley Thomas 
Cavins, William Ferguson 
Conard, James Stiles 
Conger, Gary Roy 
Crowl, Emery Augustus 
Dewhirst, John Mark 
Dewhirst, Solomon Homer 
Dillon, Roy Adelbert 
Dutcher, Stephen Albert 
Fairchild, James Albert Leroy 
Flentje, Lewis Edwin 
Gott, Charles 

Grosscup, Lawrence Wilson 
Hall, Charles Elwood 
Hawkes, William 
Hayes, Frank Crawford 
Hess, Ardie Durward 
Hiett, Asa Burnett 
Hilyard, Horace Mann 
Himes ; Robert Pollock 
Hougland, Walter 
Hummel, Adam Albert 
Jackson, Charles Barrett 
Jacob, William James 
Keiner, Frederick William 
King, Charles Roy 
Klaas, Louis Henry 
Kofoid, Reuben Nelson 
Liggitt, Richard Clayton 
Luke, Edward 

McCormick, Henry Goodrich 
McDonald, Dalton 
McGuffin, Ralph Dudley 
Madden, George Bowman 
Miller, Harry Eugene 
Mills, Leroy Addison 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE. 


■ Mercer, 


Keithsburg 


Vermilion, 


Catlin 


Vermilion, 


Rankin 


*McLean, 


Hudson 


Ford 


Melvin 


Coles, 


Campbell 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


Piatt, 


Monticello 


Ford, 


Gibson City 


Shelby, 


Findlay 


Clay, 


Passport 


Clay, 


Passport 


Mason, 


San Jose 


Pike, 


Neiv Canton 


Edgar, 


Warrenton 


Macoupin, 


Palmyra 


Piatt, 


LaPlace 


Marshall, 


Wenona 


Douglas, 


Camargo 


Henry, 


Kewanee 


Schuyler, 


Camden 


Pike, 


Pearl 


Tazeivell, 


Pekin 


Monroe, 


Waterloo 


"-•McLean, 


Normal 


Coles, 


Cook's Mills 


Ford, 


Roberts 


Vermilion, 


Danville 


( Washington), 


Pioneer 


Clinton, 


New Memphis 


Macon, 


Flwin 


DeKalb, 


Hinckley 


*McLean, 


Normal 


Livingston, 


Nevada 


Vermilion, 


Danville 


McLean, 


Normal 


Vermilion, 


Potomac 


Lake, 


Libertyville 


McLean, 


Normal 


Warren, 


Monmouth 


Putman, 


Mt. Palatine 



88 Annual Catalogue 

NAMES. COUNTY. POSTOFFICE, 

Miner, Thomas Daniel Shelby, Quigley 

Morgan, Ora Sherman Kane, Hampshire 

Morrell, John Finley Pike, . Perry 

Morrissey, Martin Tazewell, HopcdaU 

Myall, Charles Arthur Cook, Oak Lark 

Myers, Charles Oscar Tazewell, Tazewell 

Naffziger, Simon Edward Tazewell, Miuier 

Ness, Henry De Kalb, Shahbona 

Norton, Archie Carlisle Fulton, Farmington 

Palmer, George Merit Kane, Aurora 

Patterson, Frank McLean, McLean 

Peasley, William K. ^McLean, Bloominglon 

Pfeiffer, Frederick *(Missouri) St. Louis 

Price, Hollis Hubert Shelby, Shelbyville 

Puffer, Wilfred Edward Livingston, Odell 

Readhimer, Jerome Edward ^{Louisiana) Saline 

Reece, John S. Woodford, Cruger 

Robison, Oliver Newton Moultrie, Windsor 

Smith, C. Henry Woodford, Metamora 

Solomon, George Washington Macoupin, Palmyra 

Stewart, William - *McLean, Normal 

Taylor, Samuel Martin ^McLean, Bloomington 

Troxel, Cecil Warren *McLean, Normal 

Urban, Harvey Benjamin McLean, Gibson City 
Wakeland, Charles Richard Pulaski, New Grand Cham 

Walter, Henry Pope, Golconda 

Walters, Arthur E. Whiteside, Colda 

Whetsel, Joseph Clarence Woodford, Secor 

White, Albert E. Livingston, Bhickslonc 

Wilson, Arthur McCandless Bock Island, Rural 

Wilson, Frank Lester McLean, Bloomington 

Wilson, Harry Scott Bock Island, Rural 

Worrell, Joseph Carl Hancock, Chili 

Wynd, Robert Smith Tazewell, Uopedale 

Yelch, George Henry Richland, Olney 

Young, James William Vermilion, Bismark 



Students Who Have Completed Less Than One Year's Work. 

Adee, Mary Leota Winnebago, Borkford 

Albertson, Sarah Marshall, Henry 

Anderson, Elsie Grace Macon, Maroa 

Anderson, Lola Belle Macon, Maroa 



Illinois State Normal University. 



89 



NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE 


Andrew, Metta 


Piatt, 


Monticello 


Andrews, Margaret G. 


Knox, 


Altona 


Augustine, Ora May 


McLean, 


Normal 


Bader, Blanche 


Schuyler, 


Baders 


Bader, Grace 


Schuyler, 


Baders 


Baird, Mildred Eliza 


*3fcLean, 


Bloomington 


Baldwin, Gertrude 


Fulton, 


Ipava 


Baldwin, Letta May 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Barger, Helen Merenda 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Barthel, Dorothea Emma 


Carroll, 


Milled gev die 


Beal, Sadie 


Bock Island, 


Joslyn 


Bear, Etta Myrtle 


Macon, 


Bear sd ale 


Bear, Jennie Rees, 


Hancock, 


Joetta 


Bedinger, Letitia 


* McLean, 


Norm tl 


Bedinger, Nellie 


^McLean, 


Normal 


Biehl, Gertrude Augusta 


Douglas, 


Camargo 


Bogenreif, Gertrude Marie 


Stephenson, 


Pearl City 


Boling, Sarah M. 


Tazewell, 


PeJcin 


Bosworth, Helen Florence 


Cook, 


Eranston 


Bosworth, Lucy Adelia 


Cook, 


Evanston 


Boyd, Myrtle May 


Woodford, 


Panola 


Boynton, Elmyra Ida 


McD no ugh, 


Prairie City 


Bradley, Carrie Florence 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Bricker, Eddeth Pearl 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Briggs, Fleta Agatha 


Tazewell, 


Minier 


Burtis, Pearl Edna 


* McLean, 


Hudson 


Calhoun, Florence Katie 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Campbell, Kate Belle 


Cook, 


Chicago 


Catron, Mary Delia 


FuHon, 


Ipava 


Chamberlain, Linnie 


Whiteside, 


Erie 


Chapman, Delia Virginia 


Woodford, 


El Paso 


Cleary, Minnie 


Bureau, 


Wyanet 


Cole, Delia Evalina 


Champaign, 


Sidney 


Conard, Lulu Florence 


Piatt, 


Monticello 


Conger, Hattie Edna 


Ford, 


Gibson City 


Conover, Clemence Ann 


Kendall, 


Piano 


Cooper, Nancy Burton 


(Kentucky) 


Bloom field 


Crosby, Lucie Claire 


LaSalle, 


Grand Bidge 


Cuddy, Marcella Elizabeth 


Will, 


Wilton Center 


Cunningham, Ella 


Warren, 


Monmouth 


Curry, Beulah 


Schuyler, 


Frederick 


Cutler, Emily Mae 


Bock Island, 


Edgington 



90 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Damert, Harriet Cora Stephenson, 

Daniels, Lucretia Ellen Vermilion, 

Darrah, Mrs. Annie Champaign, 

Davis, Lillian Agnes Hancock, 

Davison, May Will, 

Delaney, Lida Mabel Macon, 

Dennis, Myrtle Tazewell, 

Denny, Effie Tazewell, 

Deutsch, Bertha Jessie LaSalle, 

Dewhirst, Mrs. Alta H. Clay, 

Diehl, Erma Coles, 

Dihel, Bertha Jane Mercer, 

Dowdell, Anna Theresa Sangamon, 

Dunlap, Emma Allissia, Sangamon, 

Dunlap, Zylpha Myrtle Sangamon, 

Eastman, Mrs. Mary Donagh LaSalle, 

Elliott, Margaret Catharine, Fulton, 

Eminger, Cora May Ford, 

Ericksen, Belle Kendall, 

Evans, Mattie Blanche Woodford, 

Fairchild, Myrtle Florence, Vermilion, 

Feeney, Anna Elizabeth Champaign, 

Finch, Helene Whiteside, 

Finney, May Belle, Peoria, 

Fisher, Orpha Salome * Woodford, 

Foster, Margaret Emma Montgomery, 

Frazier, Laura May, Tazewell, 
Friedrich, Katharine Christine LaSalle, 

Fritter, Clara Theresa Piatt, 

Fritter, Edna Elizabeth Piatt, 

Fruin, Hannah Letitia *McLean, 

Fulton, Maude M. Cass, 

Galford Amy Alice Logan, 

Card, Josepha Pike, 

Gaston, Nannie Baird Marion, 

Gates, Carrie Alice McLean, 

Gibeaut, Stella Maud McLean, 

Gilbert, Blanche Eunice Woodford, 

Gillan, Violet Tazewell, 

Godwin, Lottie Pike, 

Goodwin, Mary Elizabeth Macoupin, 

(■Graves, Jessie Edna Bureau, 
\ Not permit ted to i eturn. 



POSTOFFICE. 

Lena 

Danville 

Sad or us 

Augusta 

Braidwood 

Maroa 

Minier 

Mackinaw 

Troy Grove 

Passport 

Mattoon 

Sunbeam 

Springfield 

Springfield 

Springfield 

Earlville 

Table Grove 

Gibson City 

Newark 

El Paso 

Danville 

Iresdale 

Fulton 

Peoria 

Roanoke 

Nokomis 

Delavan 

Mend at a 

Monticello 

Monticrllo 

Bloomington 

Ashland 

Elkhart 

New Canton 

Carter 

Shirley 

Bloomington 

El Paso 

Mackinaw 

Pleasant Hill 

Hunker Hill 

La Moille 



Illinois State Normal University. 



91 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Graves, Mary E. LaSalle, 

Graves, Vega ^McLean, 

Grawburg, Millie Maud Marshall, 

Greer, Sarah Cook, 

Gregory, Emma *McLean, 

Hackett, Georgia Ogle, 

Hafliger, Stella Tazewell, 

Hall, AraBeulah White, 

Hance, Millie Ber Nette Douglas, 

Handlin Ac ah Catherine Christian, 

Harding, Mae Donna * McLean, 

Harrah, Edith A. Coles, 

Harter, Mabel Bertha Marshall, 

Hausen, Minnie Adella Lee, 

Hayden, Mary Edams McLean, 

Haynie, Mary Marion, 

Heisey, Kansas May Marion, 

Hendron, Iva *McLean, 

Herrington, Cora Elizabeth McLean, 

Herrington, Minnie Peoria, 

Hess, Adah Belle Pike, 

Hess, Hattie Agnes Stephenson, 

Hess, Rutha Blanche Pike, 

Holden, Bertha Belle Iroquois, 

Holmes, Easter May Wayne, 

Homan, Lucy Fanchion Peoria, 

Howarth, Bessie Jane Livingston, 

Hunt, Florence Abigail Jo Daviess, 

Hussey, Halcyone Belle Sangamon, 

Iliff, Nellie Maude Woodford, 

Jackson, Mrs. Ida May Vermilion, 

Jackson, Louise Julia Bureau, 

Jenkins, Casaline Marion Fulton, 

Johnson, Amanda Bureau, 

Johnson, Helen Blanche Lake, 

Johnson, Ida Matilda Bureau, 

Johnson, Minnie Sigri Bureau, 

Johnston, Nina May *McLean, 

Johonnot, Katherine Frances McIIenrg, 

Jones, Mary Frances McHenry, 

Joynt, Sarah Elizabeth Logan, 

Judy, Laura May Vermilion, 

Kearney, Myrtle Ethel Moultrie, 



POSTOFFICE. 

Earlville 

Blooming ton 

Henry 

Evanston 

Normal 

Harper 

Dillon 

Carmi 

Newman 

Assumption 

Arroirsmi/h 

Diona 

Wenona 

Franklin Grove 

Bloomington 

Salem 

Iuka 

McLean 

Bloomington 

Brimjield 

Milton 

Orangeville 

Milton 

Wellington 

Mt. Erie 

Cramers 

Fail-bury 

Hanover 

Willianisville 

Washburn 

Danville 

Ohio 

Vermont 

Buda 

Waukegan 

Wyanet 

Princeton 

Hudson 

Richmond 

Hebron 

Latham 

Blue Grass 

Lovington 



, I nnual < 'dialogue 



NAME. 


COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE. 


Keith, Evalyn 


Hancock, 


I /una 


Keys, Etta 


Logan, 


Beason 


Kienzle, Isabelle Lena 


Champaign, 


St. Joseph 


Killian, Agnes 


* McLean, 


Towanda 


Killian, Katherine Camillus 


*McLean, 


Normal 


King-, Lulu Belle 


Ogle, 


Kings 


King, Winona Adelia 


Stephenson, 


L,en a 


Kingman, Myrtle 


Tazewell, 


Del a van 


Kingsbury, Charlotte Hannah 


Bond, 


Greenville 


Knight, Flora Edith 


Coles, 


Lerna 


Koehler, Emma Otillie 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Koehler, Houlda Emelia 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Kraeger, Grace Clark 


Kane, 


A nrora 


Krause, Emma Hettia 


Warren, 


Monmouth 


Kreitzer, Emma 


Ford, 


Elliott 


Kumpf, Anna Katharina 


Tazewell, 


Pekin 


Lantz, Anna Maud, 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Lessley, May, 


St. Clair, 


Mascoutah 


Lewis, Adelaide Belle 


Ford, 


Piper City 


Lewis, Alta May 


* McLean, 


Sagbrook 


Lloyd, Helen Ethel 


* Mc Lean, 


Bloomington 


Loew, Carrie 


Tazewell, 


East Peor'a 


Lubbers, Sarah Theda 


Logan, 


Enid en 


Lyons, Alice, 


Bureau, 


Arlington 


McDavid, Mary Edna 


Moultrie, 


Bethany 


McDowell, Mabel Kathryn, 


Whiteside, 


Emerson 


McDowell, Pearl Maxwell 


Tazewell, 


San Jose 


McGriff, Mary Barris, 


Richland, 


Olneg 


Mclntyre, May, 


1 At Salle, 


Streator 


McNaughton, Marthia May 


Ogle, 


Stillman Valley 


McKeynolds, Eunice, 


Moultrie, 


Bethany 


Maile, Anna Eva 


Will, 


Wilmington 


Major, Lessie 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


Maloney, Mamie Charlotte 


^McLean, 


Bloomington 


Mam men, Vera 


^McLean, 


Blooming/on 


Mann. Martha Klnora 


Edgar, 


Paris 


Marsh. .Jennie May 


Warren, 


Monmouth 


Martin, Blanche Bradford 


Stephenson , 


Win slow 


Maurer, Pauline Marie 


Sangamon, 


CrOSS Plains 


Mayne, Edith Mabel 


Bureau, 


Van Orin 


Meier, A una Catharine 


Scott, 


Bluffs 


Michael. ( lora 1 Eelen 


Doug la 8, 


Newman 


Miller, Thena Ellen 


Douglas, 


Tuscola 



Illinois State Normal University. 



93 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Mills, Flora Lavinia Putnam, 

Montague, Blanche Elvira Stephenson, 

Mowry, Adah Champaign, 

Mover, Verna Alberta ^McLean, 

Mulroy, Florence DeKalb, 

Myers, Nettie Carroll, 

Needham, Bessie Agnes, Cumberland, 

Neely, Mary Etta Mason, 

Neikirk, Viola Lucretia Mason, 

Nelson, Nellie Constance {Wisconsin) 

Newell, Agnes Montgomery 

Osborne, Lora Jane Mercer, 

Paas, Sophia Amelia Mason, 

Parker, Carrie Juliet Kankakee, 

Parry, Elsie Delia Fulton, 

Patterson, Gertrude Winnebago, 

Perkins, Marie Ethel Warren, 

Perry, Carrie (Nebraska) 

Polhemus, Georgia Du Page, 

Porter, Rilla Fulton, 

Prather, Josie Cumberland, 

Pressey, Lilian Dale Vermilion, 

Protsman, Pearl Elizabeth Shelbg, 

Putnam, Helen Clifford Sangamon, 

Pyatt, Pearl Moultrie, 

Raney, Nettie Grace La Salle. 

Ratekin, Lola Dell Warren, 

Reinmiller, Louise Margaret Livingston, 

Reiterman, Catherine Cook, 

Rengel, Elisabeth Bertha *McLean, 

Riddell, Ethel Grace La Salle, 

Riley, Katharine, Agnes Marshall, 

Robertson, Grace D. Piatt, 

Robertson, Lura May, Pope, 

Robertson, Purl McLean, 

Rogers, Edith May Boone 

Rollins, Halcyon Rebecca Vermilion, 

Ross, Bertha Pearle Edgar, 

Rowe, Rose Etta Champaign, 

Ryan, Katharine Agnes Tazewell, 

Sallenger, Mary Vienna Christian, 
Sandeson, Minnetta Christa Vermilion, 

Sawyer, Ida Sophia Kane, 



POSTOFFICE. 

Clear Creek 

Len a 

Champaign 

Say brook 

Hinckley 

Chiduiek 

Xeoga 

Easton 

Forest City 

S tough' on 

Farmersville 

Cable 

San Jose 

Manteno 

A storia 

Rockford 

Roseril/e 

Tecumseh 

A nrora 

Lpava 

Neoga 

Potomac 

Prairie Home 

Pleasant Plains 

Bethany 

Lostant 

Swan Creek 

Wilson 

Evanston 

Danvers 

Earlrille 

Lacon 

Monticello 

Hart stile 

Blooming ton 

Belvidere 

Rankin 

Redmon 

Ludlow 

Minier 

Palmer 

Danville 

Aurora 



94 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Sayle, Inezella Carroll, 

Schiek, Christena Will, 

Scott, Gertrude May Coles, 

Scott, Vernie Irene Ogle, 

Schroeder, Frieda Adelaide *McLean, 

Searles, Alice May Grundy, 

Seymour, Carrie Vaughan Bond, 

Simcox, Anna Maude, Marion, 

Simmons, Jessie Josephine Hancock, 

Simpson, Elizabeth Morgan, 

Sinclair, Marietta, LaSalle, 

Smith, Carrie Elizabeth, Tazewell, 

Smith, Daisy May Tazerell, 

Smith, Georgia LaSalle, 

Smith, Kate Belle Tazewell, 

Smith, Margaret Elizabeth 'Tazewell, 

Smith, Mina May Tazewell, 

Smith, Ruth Belle Tazewell, 

Snider, Nellie M. Peoria, 

Snow, Cora *McLean. 

Spargrove, Lura Lucile Marshall, 

Spear, Lurene Caroline Vermilion, 

Speer, May Mercer, 

Staver, Bertha Cornelia Stephenson, 

Stephan, Edith May Jo Daviess, 

Stites, Lena Katherine *McLean, 

Strohm, Mary Ann, Stephenson, 

Stubblefield, Edith Eliza *McLean, 

Sutter, Anna Dawson Moultrie, 

Sylvester, Florence Cool;, 

Taylor, Virginia Cook, 

Thompson, Iva Irene Effingham, 

Thompson, Josephine West Kane, 

Thorp, Luella May McLean, 
Titter ington, Susan Edgington Rock Island, 

Trorrip, Bertha Elizabeth Tazewell, 

Troxel, Mabel Edith -McLean, 

Turnbull, Jessie Junkin Warren, 

Turner, Gladys Shelby, 

Turner, I rene Whiteside, 

Wallace, Lura Margaret Warren, 

Wallace, Margaret Emma Macon, 



POSTOFFICE. 

Hanover 

Mokena 

Mattoon 

Elida 

Bloomington 

Minooka 

Sorento 

Pat oka 

Joetta 

Murrayville 

Meriden 

Hoped ale 

Deer Creek 

Men dot a 

Lilly 

Morton 

Dillon 

Morton 

Peoria 

Normal 

Wenona 

Rankin 

Sunbeam 

Freeport 

Scales Mound 

Bloomington 

Winslow 

Normal 

Lovington 

Chicago 

Chicago 

Shumway 

Elgin 

Normal 

Rock Island 

Minier 

Normal 

Monmouth 

Oconee 
Tampico 

( 'oldlirook 
Decatur 



Illinois State Normal University. 



95 



NAMES. 

Walsh, Mary Genevieve 
Walz, Emma 
Wamsley, Emma Mae 
Warnick, Anna 
Waters, Eva May 
Waters, Gertrude 
Weldon, Margaret Rose 
Wells, Gertrude 
Wells, Jennie Blanche 
Wells, Jennie Entrekin 
Wells, Jessie Belle 
Wells, Pearl Amanda 
Wesenbaum, Elizabeth Henriett 
Wheeler, Hattie May 
Wheeler, Mary 
Whitmore, Maude Amelia 
Wierman, Edna Susannah 
Williams, Winifred Sue 
Wilson, Mamie Eva 
Wilson, Theodora 
Woltman, Helena Olga 
Worth, Cleora Ann 
Wyckoff, Irene Bessie 

Adams, Oscar 
Anderson, George Emanuel 
Baker, Frederick Alva 
Baker, Joseph Howard 
Barkmeier, Hiram Jonathan 
Bennett, William Everett 
Birdzell, Charles Allen 
Blevins, Robert Alexander 
Bonnell, Clarence 
Branaman, John 
Brooks, Samuel John 
Buhan, George Ellwood 
Bullock, Forrest Minor 
Burroughs, Dillon 
Burton, John Franklyn 
Camp, John Jay 
Campton, Thomas 
Carpenter, Walter Hubert 
Conard, Solon Eli 



COUNTY. 

Will, 

Stephenson, 
Champaign, 
Lee, 

Sangamon, 
McDonongh, 

* McLean, 
Winnebago 
Schuyler ; 
Macon, 
Mac n, 
McLean, 

a Christian, 

* McLean 
Stephenson, 
Kankakee, 
Putnam, 
Douglas, 
Fulton, 
Putnam, 
(Missouri) 
De Kalb, 
Macon, 

Edgar, 

(Kansas) 

Clark, 

McLean, 

Mason, 

DeWitt, 

Champaign, 

Macoupin, 

Christian, 

Moultrie, 

Logan, 

(Pennsylvania) 

Woodford, 

Crawford, 

Schuyler, 

Woodford, 

De Witt, 

DuPage, 

Piatt, 



POSTOFFICE. 

Joliet 
Freeport 

JJrbana 

Lee Center 

Mechanicsburg 

Table Grove 

Normal 

Winnebago 

Littleton 

El iv in 

Elwin 

Normal 

Assumption 

Normal 

Freeport 

Momence 

Mount Pal dine 

Newman 

Fair view 

Magnolia 

Neeper 

Rollo 

Harristown 

Scott Land 

Lola 

West Union 

McLean 

San Jose 

Lane 

St. Joseph 

Atwater 

Taylorville 

Bruce 

Natrona 

Kantner 

Eureka 

Oblong 

Brooklyn 

Melamora 

Waynesville 

Jtoselle 

Monticello 



96 



AlllilKll ('ll/ldoi/ltl' 



NAMES. 

Cook, Isaac 
Cowan, Henry 
Dawson, Judge Leighton 
Dodson, Ira 

Doud, Robert Freeman 
Dunlap, Matthew William 
Dunlap, William Lindsey 
Eaton, Charles David 
fElkins, George L. 
Evans, Aylmer Hunt 
Francis, Charles Henry 
Fry, William 
Gammill, Finis Isgrig 
Gaston, William Tracy 
Gigley; John Frank 
Graffis, Runnion T. 
Hainline, Jesse 
Hamilton, Albert Dilline 
Hartsell, William Webster 
Hausen, Henry Warren 
Hess, Absolom 
Hohnke, Robert Ernest 
Honn, Franklin Edward 
Hunt, Orson Earl 
Jackson, John Wesley 
Jaeckel, Henry Charles 
Jaeckel, William John 
Jeffries, William Jerdell 
Jolly, Jasper 
Jones, Roy Herbert 
Kennel, John J. 
King, Wirt Charles 
Lauterbaugh, Walter Delacour 
Lindsey, Wyllard Briston 
Linn, Joseph Henry 
Li una bar v. John Druce 
McKnight, Joseph 
McWherter, Robert Franklin 
Markland, Lucien Daniel 
Marxer, A Lois Joseph 
Mathison, George 
M 1 1 ler, John I 'eter 

■ NTol pei mitted to return. 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFF1CE. 


Fulton, 


Farmiia/loii 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Edgar, 


Scott La ml 


Vermilion, 


S,,i(h r 


Hancock, 


Elvastm 


Livingston, 


BldJckston'e 


Livingston, 


Blackstohe 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Johnson, 


Vienna 


Jo Daviess, 


Hanover 


LaSalle, 


Lostant 


Champaign, 


Santoul 


Coles 


Friiia 


Marion, 


Carter 


{Indiana) 


Remington 


Mason, 


Natrona 


McLean, 


Normal 


Marlon, 


Salem 


Shelby, 


Windsor 


Lee, 


Franklin Grove 


Pike, 


Pearl 


La Salle, 


La Salle 


Coles, 


Areola. 


Jo Detviess, 


Hetnover 


Sangeimon, 


Buffedo Hail 


Monroe, 


Heeler 


Monroe, 


Hecker 


Livingston , 


Cam j> as 


Christian, 


Petna 


Piatt, 


Monticello 


Tazewell, 


Morton 


Schuyler, 


Brooklyn 


Sangamon, 


Illiopolis 


Lawrence, 


i a rd.s 


SI. Clair, 


Mascoutah 


('ales. 


( 'liarltslon 


*McLean, 


Normal 


Hand, 


Sorento 


Liringslon, 


Pontiac 


St. ( 'lair, 


Millstadt 


Will, 


Peotone 


Monroe, 


1 ho risonviUe 



Illinois State Normal University. 



07 



NAMES. 

Mize, Wilbur Roseberry 
Moore, Alfred Newton 
Morse, Herbert Henry 
Morton, John Brown, 
Musskopf, Edward Adolph 
Nail, William Franklin 
Noble, Clark 
Noecker, Harry Moris 
Owen, David Brashareo 
Perkins, Orville Benton 
Petty, Clarence Melville 
Porter, Guy 

Pringle, Maurice Franklin 
Rennels, Albert Thornton 
Rice, Thomas Ernest 
Sale, Walter W. 
Schick, John Calvin 
Schoenberger, Egidius George 
Shields, John Elbert 
Shinkle, Vincent Garman 
Shoemaker, John David 
Simmons, J. Claude 
Smith, Gale 
Smith, Walter Earl 
Solomon, William Asburry 
Sparks, Robert Leslie 
Spencer, Charles H. 
Staub, Theodore 
Stipp, Daniel Crockett 
Stotler, Howard Arthur 
Stout, Henry Field 
Strayer, Martin Luther 
Sullivan, William 
Taylo, Myron DeWitt 
Turnbaugh, William Edward 
Ullrich, Frederick 
Victor, William Albert 
Virtue, Ira Sankey 
Waterman, Wilbur Ernest 
Waugh, Louis Herbert 
Weber, Edward Jacob 
Weber, William 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFPJCE. 


Madison, 


Manix 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


Stark. 


Wyoming 


Marion, 


Salem 


St. Clair, 


Millstadt 


Montgomery, 


Butler 


Jersey, 


Otterville 


Macon, 


Argenta 


Fayette, 


Brownstown 


Warren , 


Boseville 


Lawrence, 


Sumner 


Fulton, 


Ipava 


McLean, 


Normal 


Coles, 


Charleston 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


* Champaign, 


Fisher 


Lawrence, 


Sumner 


Knox, 


Yates City 


Coles, 


Oakland 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Clark, 


Westfield 


Hancock, 


Fountain Green 


*McLean, 


Normal 


Kankakee, 


Bonfield 


Macoupin, 


Palmyra 


Tazewell, 


Mackinaw 


(Ohio) 


Gilboa 


St. Clair, 


Mascoutah 


Bureau, 


Princeton 


*McLean, 


Hudson 


Fulton, 


Fairview 


Champaign, 


DeGraff 


Edgar, 


Chrisman 


McLean, 


Saybrook 


Pike, 


Pleasant Hill 


St. Clair, 


New Baden 


Pulaski, 


Wetaug 


Jo Daviess, 


Elizabeth 


Grundy, 


Wenona 


Union, 


Cobden 


Madison, 


Fosterburg 


Madison, 


Fosterburg 



—7 



98 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. 

Whitney, Emmett W. 
t Wiley, Oscar Randle 
Wilson, James William 
Wilson, Rufus Edgar 
Wright, George William 

tNot permitted to return. 



COUNTY. 

Champaign, 

Woodford, 

Coles, 

Fayette, 

Sangamon, 



POSTOFFICE. 

Ludlow 

Minonk 

Janesville 

Bingham 

Buffalo Hart 



Special students, 
Senior class 
Second class 
Third class 
Fourth class 



Summary. 



15 

39 

102 

280 
390 



Total 



826 



Illinois State Normal University. 



99 



Table 

SHOWING ATTENDANCE BY COUNTIES OF STUDENTS RECEIVING FREE 

TUITION. 



Adams 1 

Bond 4 

Bureau 12 

Boone 3 

Carroll 7 

Cass 1 

Champaign 15 

Christian 14 

Clark 2 

Clay 3 

Clinton 1 

Coles 23 

Cook 13 

Crawford 2 

Cumberland 4 

DeKalb 7 

DeWitt 3 

Douglas 10 

DuPage 2 

Edgar 8 

Effingham 2 

Fayette 2 

Ford 11 

Fulton 17 

Gallatin 1 

Grundy 5 

Hamilton 2 

Hancock 13 

Henderson 2 



Iroquois 5 

Jefferson 1 

Jersey 2 

Jo Daviess ... . 9 

Johnson 2 

Kane 20 

Kankakee 6 

Kendall 6 

Knox 3 

Lake 5 

LaSalle 24 

Lawrence 3 

Lee 7 

Livingston.. ]2 

Logan 7 

McDonough 2 

McHenry 6 

McLean 61 

Macon 22 

Macoupin 5 

Madison 10 

Marion 10 

Marshall 7 

Mason 8 

Mercer 6 

Monroe 4 

Montgomery 4 

Morgan 1 

Moultrie 10 

Ogle 9 



Peoria 6 

Perry 3 

Piatt 14 

Pike 13 

Pope 3 

Pulaski 2 

Putnam 12 

Richland 5 

Rock Island 6 

Sangamon 15 

Schuyler 10 

Scott 1 

Shelby 16 

Stark 4 

St. Clair 14 

Stephenson 13 

Tazewell 38 

Union 1 

Vermilion 22 

Warren 16 

Washington 1 

Wayne 2 

White 2 

Whiteside 10 

Will 10 

Winnebago 5 

Woodford 18 



Other States 



L6 



Henry 3 

Three other pupils from other states, and seventy-two additional 
students from McLean county, paid tuition at the rate of $39 per 
year. 



100 



Annual Catalogue 



Grammar Department. 





PREPARATORY CLASS. 




NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE. 


Bear, Jennie 


Hancock, 


Joetta 


Conger, Ethel 


McLean, 


Normal 


Carson, Estelle, 


McLean, 


Normal 


Grays, Emma 


Vermilion, 


Armstrong 


Dewhirst, Alta 


Richland, 


Passport 


Dixon, Lavina 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Dixon, Lillie 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Eaton, May 


McLean, 


Normal 


Frazier, Laura 


Tazewell, 


Delavan 


Gigley, Susan 


{Indiana) 


Remington 


Heller, Gertrude 


Woodford, 


Benson 


Herrington, Minnie 


Peoria 


Brimfield 


Hickey, Kate, 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Hussey, Pearle, 


Sangamon, 


Williamsville 


Killian, Agnes 


McLean, 


Towanda 


McDowell, Pearl, 


Tazewell, 


San Jose 


McKee, Mary 


Stark, 


Elmira 


Perkins, Marie 


Warren, 


Roseville 


Searles, Allie M. 


Will, 


Plavnfield 


Anderson, Frank 


(Kansas) 


Iola 


Brooks, Samuel 


Logan, 


Natrona 


Cook, Isaac 


Fulton, 


Farmington 


Fleisher, Harry 


Bureau, 


Kasbeer 


Franzen, Theodore C 


Livingston, 


Odcll 


Gigley, John F. 


(Indiana) 


Remington 


Hartsell, Webster 


Shelby, 


Windsor 


Hines, William 


McLean , 


Shirley 


Jeffries, W. D. 


Livingston, 


Pwight 


King, Wirt C. 


Schuyler, 


Brooklyn 


Laferty, George 


Mercer, 


Norwood 


Marxer, Alois J. 


St. Clair, 


Millstadt 


McKnight, .Joseph 


McLean, 


Normal 


Milner, .James B. 


( Indiana) 


Remington 



Illinois State Normal University. 



101 



NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE. 


McWherter, Robert F. 


Bond, 


Sorento 


Moots, Bert C. 


McLean, 


Normal 


Perkins, Orville, 


Warren, 


Roseville 


Ramsey, William G., 


Mercer, 


Norwood 


Rice, William 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


Russell. Robert 


[Indiana) 


Remington 


Sale, Walter W. 


McLean, 


Normal 


Skinner, Webster 


McLean, 


Normal 


Smith. Walter E. 


Kankakee, 


Bonfield 


Spencer, William 


McLean, 


Arroicsmith 


Waugh, L. Herbert 


Union, 


Cobden 


Total, 


- - - - 


44 


H 


igh School, First Year. 




Champion. Marie 


McLean. 


Normal 


Ferguson, Edith 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Graves, Vega 


McLean, 


Bloominqton 


Mammen, Vera 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Mavity. Louise 


McLean, 


Normal 


Richards, Florence 


McLean, 


Normal 


Vaile, Eleanor 


{California) 


San Diego 


Baker, Clarence 


Shelby, 


Prairie Home 


Capen, Bernard 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Carlock, Bruce 


McLean, 


Normal 


Dillon, Ray 


McLean, 


Normal 


Greenough, Charles 


McLean, 


Yuton 


Howell. Frank 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Hazle. Stephen 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Johnson, Walter 


McLean, 


Normal 


Mammen, Harry 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Total, 


GRAMMAR GRADES. 


16 


Alspaugh, Mamie 


McLean, 


Normal 


Bishop, Lulu 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Bos worth, Helen 


McLean, 


Normal 


Bright, Fannie 


McLean, 


Normal 


Broadhead, Lemma 


McLean, 


Normal 


Brock, Mabel 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Brown, Grace 


McLean, 


Normal 



102 



Annual Catalogue 



NAMES. 

Crays, Edith 
Courtright, Clara 
Dillon, Bessie 
Dunlap, May 
Hiett, Ola 
Humphre} 7 , Jessie 
Jackson, Virginia 
Johnston, Edna 
Proctor, Norma 
Roder, Mattie 
Schaffer, Lena 
Smith, Marian 
Smitson, Laura 
Snow, Vera 
Stewart, Nellie 
Tipton, Winona 
Wilson, Maude 
VanHook, Nelly 

Asher, Burt 
Beadle, Elbert 
Burtis, Ira 
Chambers, William 
Crigler, Clute 
Dick, Carl 
Dick, Fred 
Evans, Mark 
Gantz, Irvin 
Gardner, George 
Haitz, Charles 
Hayes, Wilson 
Helmick. Russell 
Ihbler, Herbert 
Hilyard, Perry 
Eutchin, Elberon 
Hi IT, Harry 
Johnson, Homer 
.Johnstone, Lyle 
Kent, Hoyal B. 
Lindblad, Edward 
Lord, Guy 
Mammen, Ernest 
John. Matron 



COUNTY. 

Vermilion, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

Will 

M<Lean, 

Mr Lean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

Tazewell, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

31c Lean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

Winnebago, 

McLean, 

Mc Lean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

Monroe, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McL(<in, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

Mc Lean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

(Arkansas) 



POSTOFFICE. 

Arms/ ro ikj 

Normal 
Peotom 

Normal 

Normal 
Normal 

Normal 

Normal 

Normal 

Deer Creek 
Normal 

Normal 
Normal 

Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 

Normal 

Normal 

Hudson 

Bloomi nylon 

Normal 

Bloomi nylon 

Bloomington 

Bloominyton 

Bloominylon 

Bockford 

Normal 

Bloominylon 

Normal 

Normal 

Waterloo 

Bloominyton 

Normal 

Bloomington 

Bloominyton 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 

Bloomington 
Little Hock 



Illinois State Normal University. 



103 



NAMES. 

Molesworth, Clyde 
Sage, Chester 
Sinclair, Uel 
Smith, Ward 
Stubbletield, David 
Weldon, James 
Wentz, Roy 
Witwer, Leroy 
Wrigley, Harry 
Veach, James D. 
Vencill, Albert 
Total, 60. 



COUNTY. 


POSTOFFICE. 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean , 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 



Summary, 



Preparatory class, 
First year, High School, 
Grammar grades, 



44 
16 

60 



Total, 
Girls 
Boys, 



120 
51 
69 



Total, 



120 



104 



Annual Catalogue 



Intermediate Department. 



Alspaugh, Willa 
Augustine, Myrtle 
Bates, Laura 
Benbrook, Leah 
Bosworth, Mabel 
Bricker, Jessie 
Brown, Etta 
Chrisman, Nellie 
Clough, May 
Coen, Eleanor 
Coen, Margaret 
Coith, Clara 
Coith, Edna 
Coleman, Juanita 
Courtright, Ada 
Courtright, Ruth 
Craig, Edith 
Crigler, Nina 
Crist, Lulu 
Dillon, Bessie 
Dillon, Ethel 



Felmley, Mildred 
Felmley, Ruth 
Goodspeed. Ada 
Goodspeed, Laura 
Gregory, Lois 
Haitz, Mamie 
Haney, Alice 
Haney, Ruth 
Hartley, Prances 
Heller, Lottie 
Hibler, Bruce 
Hiett, Lela 
Huffington, Grace 
Johnson, Edna 
Kennedy, Merle 
Knott, Gracie 
Lord, Mamie 
Lutz, Mabel 
Mace, Ruth, 
McNeil, Grace 
Martens, Anna 



Mavity, Mary 
Miller, Nellie 
Milliken, Ora 
Morse, Marguerite 
Myers, Irene 
Perry, Barza 
Railsback, Marie 
Railsback, Mary 
Rosenberry, Ethel 
Scott, Mildred 
Smith, Alice 
Smith, Helen 
Smitson, Nellie 
Stanger, Montana 
Taylor, Ocela 
Thompson, Ethel 
Tomlinson, Annie 
Triplett, Margaret 
Vencill, Lulu 
Wheeler, Jessie 
Wilson, Mabel 



Allen, Jay 
Beadle, Homer 
Beckwith, Harry 
Bedinger, Franklin 
Bowen, Vernon 
Bowman, Leverett 
Bricker, Norman 
Bright, Reuben 
Broadhead, Charles 
Burwell, Clyde 
( !oith, Alvin 
Colton, Jamie 
( ourtright, Harry 
< 'raig, Fred 



Gregory, Herbert 
Haitz, Charley 
Hargitt, Leslie 
Hargitt, Percy 
Hetfield, Miller 
Howard, Archie 
Hussey, Alfred 
Hutchin, Elberon 
.Jackson, Leigh 
Jackson, Lester 
Johnson, Roy 
Kennedy, Allen 
Kirkpatrick, Charles 
Kettering, Raymond 



Mace, Lamar 
Mowrer, Paul 
Patterson, Stephen 
Pollitt, Bert 
Pollitt, Thurman 
Railsback, Fay 
Reeves, Elton 
Reeves, Thornton 
Riley, Carl 
Riley, Dean 
Rosenberry, Ea.rle 
Schad, Stuart 
Schad, William 
Shinkle, Eddie 



Illinois State Normal tJniversity. 



105 



Crigler, Burr 
Denton, Earle 
Dick, Carl 
Dick, Harry 
Dillon, Chester 
Dillon, Claire 
Dillon, Ralph 
Duff, Walker 
Frost, Walter 
Goodspeed, James 



Kulm, Louie 
Kuhn, Waldo 
Leighton, Norman 
Lindblad, Arthur 
Lindblad, Edwards 
Loehr, William 
Lord, Emory 
Lutz, David 
McCord, Freeman 



Shirk, Willie 
Snow, Charley 
Stansbury, Leslie 
Stoltze, Carl 
Tipton, Herbert 
VanHook, Herbert 
Vencill, Albert 
Weinhart, Charley 
Wentz, Roy 



Girls enrolled, 63; boys, 70; total, 133. 



106 



Annual, Catalogue 



Primary Department. 



Baylor, Irene 
Bence, Leta 
Bowman, Ocla 
Brown, Verne 
Burwell, Alice 
Courtright, Minnie 
Craig-, Edith 
Darrah, Nita 
Denton, Florence 
Dillon, Alice 
Felmley, Mildred 
Fisher, Nellie 
Frost, Ina 
Gamble. Faith 
Goodale, Helen 
Graves, Helen 

Adams, Charles 
Alspaugh, John 
Bence, Walter 
Bowers, Homer 
Bowman, Leverett 
Bricker, Oran 
Burroughs, Alva 
Burwell, Clyde 
Clark, Earl 
Collins, Irl 
Dewhirst, Joseph 
Dick, Harry 
Dillon, Claire 
Edmunds, Olin 
Erskine, Ralph 



Haitz, Etta 
Hamill, Wahneita 
Haney, Alice 
Hargitt, Daisy 
Hill, Marium 
Hoff, Reva 
Huffington, Grace 
Irvin, Hazel 
Kerrison, Cora 
Kuhn, Nellie 
Lewis, Celia 
McCormick, Ella 
McKnight, Myrtle 
McNeil, Hazel 
Marshall, Clara 
Martens, Anna 

Ferguson, Claude 
Ferguson, Herbert 
Ferguson, Lowell 
Fry, Harold 
Hargitt, Merton 
Holder, Charles 
Houchin, George 
Irvin, Delmar 
Jackson, John 
Kennedy, Frank 
Kerrison, Marcus 
Kettering, Raymond 
Lantz, Roy 
Lindblad, Nelson 
Miner, Charles 



Martens, Louise 
Moore, Sadie 
Perrin. Eva 
Railsback, Mary 
Reeder, Sally 
"Schad, Irma 
Shanklin, Ada 
Shanklin, Olive 
Sinclair, Anna 
Smith, Lucia 
Stansbury, Anna 
Underwood, Marie 
VanHook, Ethel 
Walker, Mildred 
Wells, Grace 

Morse, Heber 
Moyer, Maurice 
Palmer, Charles 
Perry, Marion 
Perry, Myron 
Pitts, Joseph 
Pollitt, Thurman 
Reeves, Thornton 
Reid, Wayne 
Rollins, Dana 
Rosenberry, Earl 
Sage, Harold 
Saunders, George 
Vencill, Harold 
Wilson, Nat 



Girls enrolled 47; Boys, 45; Total, 92. 



Illinois IStale Normal University. 10" 



General Summary. 



Normal Department, ...... 826 

Preparatory, .... 44 

Grammar Grades, . . . .76 

Practice School < 

Intermediate Grades, . . . 133 

Primary Grades, . . . .92 

Total in Practice School, ...... 345 

Grand total in Normal University, .... 1,171 

Deduct names counted twice, ..... 46 

Whole number of Different Students, . . . 1,125 



Annual Catalogue 

AND COURSE OF STUDY 

OF 

The Illinois 
State Normal University 

NORMAL, ILLINOIS 



FORTY-FIRST YEKR 



FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR ENDING JUNE 23 



1898 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 

OF THE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 



Hon. WILLIAM H. GREEN, Cairo 

PRESIDENT 

Hon. S. M. INGLIS, Spring-field 

KX-OKFICIO MEMBER AND SECRETARY 



ENOCH A. GASTMAN, Esq., Decatur 

CHARLES L. CAPEN, Esq., Blooming-ton 
WILLIAM R. SANDHAM, Esq., Wyoming 
E. R. E. KIMBROUGH, Esq., Danville 
MATTHEW P. BRADY, Esq., Chicago 
MRS. ELLA F. YOUNG, Chicago 

PELEG R. WALKER, Esq., Rockford 
M. E. PLAIN, Esq., Aurora 

FORREST F. COOK, Esq., Galesburg 
JAMES H. NORTON, Esq., Ravenswood 
M. W. SH ANN AH AN, Esq., Chicago 
JACOB A. BAILY, Esq., Macomb 

GEORGE B. HARRINGTON. Esq., Princeton 



F. I). MARQUIS, Esq., Blooming-ton 
TREASURER 



C 







FACULTY. 



JOHN W. COOK. A.M., LL.D.. President, 
professor of Mental Science and Didactics! 

HENRY McCORMICK, A.M., Ph.D., Vice-President, 
Professor of History and Geography. 

BUEL P. COLTON. A.M.. 
Professor of Natural Sciences. 

DAVID FELMLEY. A.B.. 
Professor of Mathematics. 

CHARLES A. McMURRY. Ph.D.. 
Supervisor of Practice. 

O. L. MANCHESTER. A.M., 
Professor of Ancient and Moderu Languages. 

MANFRED B. HOLMES. B.L., 
Assistant in Mental Science and Didactics. 

J. ROSE COLBY, Ph.D.. Preceptress, 

And Professor of Literature. 

MARY HARTMANN. A.M.. 
Assistant in Mathematics. 

CLARISSA E. ELA. 
Teacher of Drawing - . 

EVA WILKINS. 
Assistant in History and Geography. 

B. C. EDWARDS. 

AMELIA F. LUCAS. 

Teachers of Reading and Gymnastics. 

ELIZABETH MAVITY. 

Teacher of Grammar. 

JOSEPH G. BROWN. 
Assistant in Natural Sciences. 

MARY R. POTTER, A.B.. 
Assistant in Ancient Langruayes. 

ANDREW H. MELVILLE. 
Principal of Grammar School. 

LIDA B. McMURRY. 
Assistant Training Teacher, Primary Grades. 

MAUD VALENTINE. 
Assistant Traiuin<r Teacher. Intermediate Grades. 

ANNE A.STANLEY, 
Assistant Training Teacher. Grammar Grades. 

HARMON B. WAITS, 
Principal Second Intermediate. 

CHARLES H. ALLEN, 
Principal First Intermediate. 

ANNA KING, 
Principal Second Primary. 

JESSE M. DILLON. 
Principal of First Primary. 

ELMER W. CAVINS, 
Teacher of Penmanship and On hography. 

ANGE v. MILNER, 
Librarian. 



1 1 i Q015 5tate [for/rial tlQiuersity. 



Early History. 



HE Illinois State Normal University was established by act of 
C*l\ the Legislature in 1857. The statute providing for its location 
\\ directed the governing board to solicit bids from competing 
points. Four cities were especially interested in securing it. Bloom- 
ing-ton, McLean county, having offered the most favorable induce- 
ments, was selected as the location of the school. In October, 1857, 
the school began its sessions in rented rooms in the city of Blooming- 
ton. In September, 1860, it was removed to what was then known at* 
North Blooming-ton, where a commodious building had been erected 
for its accommodation. The suburb of North Bloomington subse- 
quently became a separate town under the name of Normal. It has 
a population of about 4,000. It is a very desirable place of residence, 
having those qualities which are especially characteristic of school 
towns. The charter provides that intoxicating liquors shall never be 
sold within the limits of the town. There are no places of amusement 
nor resorts that are in any respect objectionable. Electric cars con- 
nect Normal with Blooming-ton. 



Material Equipment, 

fHE Normal School is comfortably housed in three buildings. The 
older contains three stories and a basement. It is about 100 by 
160 feet. It is built of brick and cost originally about $120,000. 
The basement contains dressing rooms for gentlemen, a shop, a room 
used for clay work, a lunch room, and several store-rooms. On the 
first floor are dressing rooms for ladies, the offices, a spacious room for 
drawing- classes, two assembly rooms and two class rooms. On the 
second floor are the main assembly room and eight class rooms. On the 
third floor are the halls of the two literary societies and a large audi- 
torium. 

The Practice School building is a substantial brick structure of two 
stories and a basement. The basement contains play rooms and dry 
closets. On the first floor there are five school rooms, each having a 



6 ANNUAL CATAl^OGUE 

seating- capacity of forty pupils. There is, besides, a smaller room 
that is used for recitation purposes. On the second floor there is a 
room for the grammar grade, with a seating capacity of 150. In addi- 
tion to this there are ten recitation rooms, each of which is suffi- 
ciently larg-e to accommodate a class of twenty-five. The peculiar 
construction of this part of the buildin-g is to be accounted for by the 
fact that it became necessary to secure as many class rooms as possible 
in order to furnish opportunities to a large number of pupil teachers 
to engage in the practice work. 

The two buildings are heated from a commodious boiler house 
which is equipped with three boilers. 

The third building is 100 by 125 feet and contains the gymnasium, 
bath room, a bowling alley, library, and science rooms. The cut on 
the fourth page shows it as seen from the east. 

The chemical laboratory is well adapted to the needs of the school. 
The physical laboratory is well equipped with apparatus. The museum 
contains a large collection of specimens. The science department is 
furnished with an excellent lantern, and is also supplied with a steam 
pump for the compression of gases. 

There is a valuable reference library of 10,000 bound volumes and 
2.000 pamphlets. These books have been carefully selected, and there 
are scarcely any useless volumes in the collection, while new and de- 
sirable additions are being constantly made. 

Students are allowed the free use of the reading-room, and may 
draw out books without charge. The department is open seven hours 
and a half of every school day, and the librarian and an assistant are 
always in attendance. The privilege of access to the shelves has been 
established and the librarian gives instructions on the use of the library, 
in a set of informal talks. It is the aim of the teachers and the libra- 
rian to help the students to cultivate a familiarity- with good literature 
and with the use of books, and to give them the best possible assistance 
in doing their reference work. 

There are four excellent literary societies connected with the 
school. 

The campus contains fifty-six acres and affords abundant room for 
tennis and other out-door exercise. 



IIJJNOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 

The Organization of the School, 

V^HE institution known as the Normal School contains two depart- 
f^*J ments: First, the Normal Department; second, the Practice 
;i Department. 

No person is admitted to the Normal Department who does not sign 
a declaration of his intentions to teach. Applicants must be 16 years 
of ag-e if females, and 17 if males. No charge is made for tuition except 
to persons attending from other states, who do not expect to teach in 
Illinois. 

The Practice Department is a necessary adjunct of the Normal De- 
partment. It consists of a school of twelve grades, six of which are be- 
low the grammar grade. The aggregate attendance of the Training 
School is usually about 300. Nine persons are employed in connection 
with this school. Four of these devote their time to directing the prac- 
tice work of the Normal pupils; a fifth is principal of the Grammar De- 
partment. The others act as principals of the primary and intermedi- 
ate rooms. No charge is made for pupils in the primary grades. The 
pupils in the intermediate department pa}' $15 a } r ear, and those in the 
grammar grades, $25. 



Methods of Admission to the Normal School. 

All applicants for admission are required: 

1. To be, if males, not less than 17, and if females, not less than 16 
years of age; 

2. To produce a certificate of good moral character, signed by some 
responsible person; 

3. To sign a declaration of their intentions to devote themselves to 
school teaching in this State as follows: 

"I hereby solemnly declare, that my purpose in attending the Nor- 
mal University is to fit myself for teaching in the schools of Illinois, 
and that I will carry out this pledge in good faith; and I do further 
pledge myself to report to the President of the University, semi-annu- 
ally, where I am and what I am doing, for three years after graduating 
at said institution." 

Tuition is free. 

The following evidences of scholarship will admit applicants to the 
school: 

1. First-grade certificates. 

2. High school or college diplomas. 

3. Certificates of attendance at other State Normal schools or at 
the University of Illinois. 



8 ANNUM, CATALOGUE 

4. Appointments from County Superintendents. 

5. A satisfactory examination by the faculty. 

An appointment may be secured from the County Superintendent 
by successfully passing- an examination about equivalent to that re- 
quired for a second-grade certificate. 

Each county in the State is entitled to appoint two pupils, and 
each representative district is entitled to appoint, in addition, as 
many pupils as there are members in the General Assembly from that 
district. Single counties constituting a senatorial district are. there- 
fore, entitled to six pupils; senatorial districts comprising two coun- 
ties, to eight pupils; those comprising three, to ten pupils; and so 
following. In districts composed of two or more counties, Superin- 
tendents desiring to appoint more than two candidates should confer 
with the other Superintendents in the district for an allotment of the 
appointments. 

If applicants have none of the papers mentioned they are exam- 
ined by the Faculty in Reading, Arithmetic, Geography, English 
Grammar, United States History, and Orthography. If found com- 
petent they will be admitted to all of the privileges of the institution. 

There are three courses of study: ^ 

a. The regular English course of three years. \ 

b. The classical course of four years. 

c. The two-year course for graduates of accredited high schools. 

Pupils are expected to take the reg-ular work of the school. Ex- 
ception is sometimes made, but each case is passed upon individually. 
College graduates will receive special privileges in the choice of 
studies, and will be graduated by special arrangements. 

Any teacher in the State is welcome to come here at any time, to 
remain as long- as he pleases, to visit any of the classes and labora- 
tories, and to observe any of our work al without enrollment or re- 
sponsibility. 

Any one desiring to complete the course in less than the usual 
time will be offered examination in any of the studies. A residence 
of at least one year is required for graduation. Pupils are not per- 
mitted to select studies at pleasure unless they possess unusual quali- 
fications. 

Those desiring to work exclusively in our Practice Department 
will be afforded abundant opportunity to do so If found prepared. 

Xo person will be entitled to graduate who does not make the 
r< quired standing in each study of the course either by work in the 
class-room, or by examination, as described above. Any person is 
entitled to our diploma who shall have completed our required Course 
of Study, without regard to the time he may have Spent here; pro- 



ILLINOIS .STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 9 

vided, that his residence shall not be less than one year, and that his 
deportment and character shall be satisfactory to the faculty. 

We transfer to our books no marks of standing- from other institu- 
tions, but work done in other state normal schools and at the Univer- 
sity of Illinois will be accepted in lieu of work required here. 

New students are received at the beginning- of every term. It is im- 
portant that they should be present on the first day of the term, as the 
regular recitations invariably begin on the second day. Failure to be 
present on the first day does not debar one from the privilege of joining 
the school; but every day of delay in entering greatly increases the 
difficulties of the beginner's work. 



Expenses. 

The following estimate of necessary expenses is approximately cor- 
rect: 

NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

Tuition Free 

Board, 39 weeks $100 to $140 

Washing 15 to 25 

Books and stationery 10 to 15 



Total $135 to $196 



Good rooms and excellent boarding places are abundant. Arrange- 
ments can be made after arriving here better than by letter. 

Students are advised to bring with them such books as they may 
have, but not to purchase others until they arrive at Normal. Stu- 
dents arriving on the I. C. and C. & A. railroads should come to Normal 
station; those arriving by other roads can reach Normal from Bloom- 
ington by street cars. In no case is the hiring of a carriage necessary. 



General Statements. 

Thorough discipline is enforced in every department. 

A certificate is granted for the successful completion of one year's 
work, and another for that of two years. 

New students will receive a hearty welcome to the Young Men's and 
Young- Women's Christian Associations of Normal. These organiza- 
tions are vigorous and active, and seek earnestly to promote the spirit- 
ual welfare of the students. 



10 ANNUA!. CATALOGUE 

Analysis of Course of Study. 

READING.— First Term. 

I. Phonics. — 1. A thorough mastery of the forty-four elementarj- 
sounds, with study of the movements of the vocal organs in producing 
them. 2. Practice in the use of the diacritical markings used in Web- 
ster's Dictionary. 

The purpose in this work is to furnish the student a scientific basis 
for teaching the sounds, and to assist him in discovering and correct- 
ing faults of speech. 

II. Reading. — 1. Several masterpieces are read during the term. 
2. Topics are assigned for reference work. 3. Besides the general 
study of the thought an analysis of the structure of the selection is 
sometimes made. 4. In connection with the study of the author other 
selections are read to the class by the teacher to extend their know- 
ledge of his works, and to awaken higher ideals for oral work. 5. Ap- 
plication of the work in Phonics to the work in Reading. 

The aim is to teach the student how to study a selection so as to 
draw from it real value and enjoyment, and to assist him in acquiring 
power and skill in the use of the voice in expressing his thought. 

READING.— Second Term. 

One of the plays of Shakespeare forms the text of the term's work. 
The following plays are used: Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Merchant of 
Venice, As You Like It, Twelfth Night. In this work special stress is 
laid upon the natural but expressive and forcible rendering of the 
thought. All of the time that can be spared from the thought analysis 
is devoted to practice and drill in oral reading. In the thought study 
some collateral reading is required on each play. At least one com- 
mentary is read, and, if the play is historical, the history to which the 
play relates is read. 

A series of lessons on method in oral work, and the relation of phy- 
sique and voice to expression, is given. 

ARITHMETIC. First Term. 
I. Primary Arithmetic, five weeks. — (a) Purpose — To outline a course 
in number for the first four years, and develop and illustrate the prin- 
ciples and methods of instruction, (b) Topics: 1. The log-ical order of 
number knowledge. 2. The use of counters, blocks, and other aids in 
teaching number facts to 12, in developing the decimal system, in 
teaching- the fundamental operations in written arithmetic. 3. Oral 
language: Forms of description and analysis appropriate to the sev- 
eral stages. 4. Forms of written work. 5. Number stories and drill 
exercises. The proper use of a primary text-book. 6. Coordination of 
arithmetic with other branches in the primary school. 



ITJ.INOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 11 

II. Factoring, Fractions, etc., seven weeks, {a) Purpose. — 1. To or- 
ganize the student's knowledge of Arithmetic by deriving- all number- 
relations and processes from the simple idea of addition, and the 
grouping- of numbers in the decimal system. 2. To suggest methods 
and advices for teaching the several topics, (b) Method. Fundamental 
principle — every process in Arithmetic should be learned as a rational 
process; /'. e., an operation with numbers of things. From concrete 
examples there should be a conscious generalization of the process in 
the form of a rule; finally, long-continued drill until the process with 
the mere symbols becomes mechanical. Accordingly what can be done 
with integers is first learned with splints, grouped into bundles in ac- 
cordance with the laws of the decimal system. Fractions are inves- 
tigated by folding and cutting paper circles and paper squares. The 
oral description and written representation of the operations thus 
discovered are succeeding stages, (c) Topics. 1. Notation— Laws of 
the decimal system and the Arabic notation; comparison with sys- 
tems of different radix. 2. Fundamental rules — contracted methods. 
3. Factoring — principles of factoring; demonstration of tests of divis- 
ibility; greatest common factor, least common multiple. 4. Cancel- 
lation and straight-line analysis. 5. Fractions — the fractional unit; 
the functions of the denominator; illustration and demonstration of 
the six principles upon which the various operations depend. Ordi- 
nary text-book topics in fractions. In these the central thought is 
that operations with fractions are fundamentally the same as opera- 
tions with integers, the only difference arising from the different way 
of representing the unit. 6. Decimal fractions — the peculiar notation; 
reading and writing pure and complex decimals; reduction of common 
fractions to decimals; repetends and their similar laws; effects of 
moving the decimal point; limits of accuracy in multiplication and 
division. Oughtred's Contracted Methods. 

Special attention is given to oral analysis to secure an accurate 
knowledge of the language and facility in the use of the best forms of 
expression. 

The mensuration of rectangles, triangles, circles, rectangular 
prisms, and cylinders is developed in connection with this work. 
Rules of mensuration are derived from an analysis of the forms meas- 
ured. Thus, the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter 
is approximately determined by measuring carefully several cylin- 
drical bodies, and averaging the quotients obtained by dividing each 
circumference by its diameter. Cook's New Advanced Arithmetic. 

Second Term. 
Topics. 

1. Weights and Measures, three weeks. — Purpose — 1. To interest the 

students in the derivation and meaning of our standards, the history 



12 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

of the calendar, and kindred topics. 2. To inform the student in regard 
to the conditions that obtain in problems in carpeting", papering", plas- 
tering, land .and lumber measure, fencing, the measurement of bins, 
tanks, and cisterns, and other practical problems. Topics: 1. Tables 
of length, weights, value, etc. 2. The various problems in reduction 
of compound numbers. 3. Addition, subtraction, etc. 4. The interval 
between two dates. 5. Changing from one system to another. 6. The 
metric system. 7. Longitude and Time: Construction of comparison 
table, local and standard time, the international date line. 

II. Square an I Cube Root, four weeks. — Process is derived from the 
geometrical applications; i. e., finding the side of square, or edge of 
cube, whose area, or volume is known. The relations of the sides of the 
right triangle. Surface and volume of pyramid, cone, sphere shell, 
frustum. Laws of similar figures. Ratio and proportion are devel- 
oped in connection with similar figures. 

III. Percentage, five weeks. Method. — The same forms of analysis 
are used as in common fractions. The three fundamental cases are 
carefully studied, and their applications shown in Profit and Loss. 
Commission, Stocks, Insurance, Taxes, Interest, Discount and Ex- 
change. In these applications, emphasis is laid on the nature of the 
business, to which percentage is applied. The number-work becomes 
subordinate. 

ALGEBRA. — First Year, T/urd Term. 

I. Algebraic Notation — Fundamental Operations. — Especial attention is 
given to the reading" of algebraic expressions, the discussion of defi- 
nitions, positive and negative numbers, and the derivations of the laws 
of the fundamental operations. Processes and principles are arrived 
at by deductions from definitions, rather than by generalization from 
particular instances. 

II. Factoring and Fractions. These subjects are treated with more 
thoroughness than in any of our elementary text-books. The method 
applicable to each class of problems in factoring is formulated in a 
rule, describing the case and the mode of discovering the factors. 

III. Simple and Fractional Equations — Problems.— The significance of 
the several transformations of equations. How to state a problem. 

Second Year, First Term. 
Comparison of the various modes of elimination. Involution and 

Evolution. Development of the theory of exponents. Quadratic 
Equations. Especial attention is given to the language of Algebra. 
Reading of Algebraic expressi >.i-. in unambiguous phrases; accuracy 
in describing" and relating algebraic processes and in stating" prinei- 
establishtid. Rigorous demonstrations are combined with the in- 
ductive method. Wentwbrth's School Algebra. 



IM.INOIS STATK NOKMAI, UNIVERSITY. 13 

GEOMETRY.— Second Year, Second Term. 
The course extends over two terms of twelve weeks each, and in- 
cludes the ordinary hig-h-school course, in plane, solid and spherical 
Geometry. White's Geometry is the text. About one-third of the time 
is devoted to orig-inal exercises. Special attention is directed to the 
mechanism of deductive reasoning, the earlier demonstrations being- 
developed in complete syllogisms. The several stages of a demon- 
stration are seen and strict conformity to the type required. Review 
exercises include classifications of the established truths of the science 
and schemes for tracing proofs to the original definitions and axioms 
upon which they rest. Forms of geometrical notation are discussed 
and considerable practice is given in brief forms of written work. Two 
main ends are kept in view: to equip the student with the forms of 
deductive reasoning, and to make the study a drill in precise thinking 
and accurate, perspicuous expression. 

BOOKKEEPING.— Six weeks. 
The course includes six typical sets in Single and Double entry, 
with a few leading- topics in Business Arithmetic and Commercial 
Law. 

SCHOOL LAW.— Five weeks. 
The text used in Bateman's Decisions. The course is especially to 
instruct in the legal duties and powers of teachers as defined in stat- 
utes and judicial decisions. Other topics discussed are, History of 
Public Education in Illinois, The School Funds, The Various Units of 
School Administration, School Officers — Their Powers and Duties. 

GEOGRAPHY. 
Intermediate Grade. How to teach shape of the earth; motions 
of the earth with their consequences. Importance of their being able 
to read a map tight; Geography is a study of things; forms on the 
map are symbols, and stand for things; the things themselves should 
be studied as far as possible; relation of the symbol to the thing-. 
Value of pictures in teaching Geography; teacher should make collec- 
tion of geographical pictures; where such pictures can be obtained. 
Use of the stereoscope in teaching- Geography. To distinguish between 
land and water as represented on a map. Stud)- of the hemispheres, 
noting differences and resemblances, and giving reasons for names. 
Study of the continents; number; comparative size; differences and re- 
semblances; main purpose, to fix in the mind a picture of their forms 
and relative positions. Study of principal bodies of water; oceans, seas, 
gulfs, etc., noting 1 their forms and positions relative to the continents 
and to each other. Plan for the study of a continent, fitted to home 
c mtinent. Purpose of plan, to show sequence of topics in scientific 



IU.INOIS STATE NORMA!, UNIVERSITY. 15 

teaching- of Geography; the sequence should show the relation of cause 
and effects; the following sequence suggested: Position, comparative 
size, shape, outline, surface, drainage, climate, vegetation, animals, 
man and his occupations, minerals, political divisions, cities, railroads, 
etc. Elementary Physical Geography should always come first in the 
study of the continent, country, state, etc., as it is the more concrete, 
and consequently the more interesting; the Political Geography should 
come later, as it is more abstract, and is largely determined by the 
Physical Geography. Study of the United States; follow plan for 
study of a continent. Study modeling; model different forms of land 
and water; advantages of sand modeling; abuses. Review work on 
home state. Study of other states and territories. Follow the natural 
features, such as watersheds, river basins, etc., as far as possible, form- 
ing mental pictures, and representing these pictures in maps with 
crayon or pencil, and in the sand. Free use of chalk and sand. Rela- 
tion of Geography to Botany, Zoology, etc. 

Intelligent study of History based largely on Geography. Geog- 
raphy and Literature. Study of chief cities, determining reason for 
their location, principal industries and prosperity. Study of the prin- 
cipal railroads, showing their importance, reason for their location, 
their influence on the country through which they pass; influence of 
the country upon railroads. Review government of home state; study 
government of the United States, briefly. Study productions, manu- 
factures, commerce, minerals. Difference of chief corps, minerals, 
manufactures, etc., of different sections, with reasons for difference, 
as far as possible. 

Method in. Geography. — What Geography is. Is it a science? What 
is a science? What Geography is based on. The contents of Geogra- 
phy. The "cement" which holds the geography concepts, in the pro- 
per places. Why Geography should be taught: 1. For the mental 
discipline that may be obtained from it; its value in cultivating the 
perceptive powers, the memory, the representative and reflective powers. 
2. Geography should be taught for the knowledge it contains. 3. As a 
basis for the study of other subjects. 4. For its value in connection 
with commerce. 5. For its refining influence. 

Geography can be taught scientifically; the topics can be so ar- 
ranged as to show the relation of cause and effect. The analytic and 
synthetic methods of teaching with the advantages and disadvantages 
of each. Geography is a study of the earth, of forms of land and 
water, etc., and not of symbols, simply. The proper use of maps, pic- 
tures, sand-modeling, etc., in teaching Geography. The making of 
correct mental pictures lies at the base of all true study of Geography. 
The pictures of remote regions must be made from Geographical con- 



16 ANNCAI, CATALOGUE 

cepts acquired in the home neighborhood; hence the importance of 
home geography. 

Topics in preparing for Geography. Since the making of correct 
mental pictures lies at the base of all true study of Geography-, it fol- 
lows that the ideas of Position, Direction, Distance. Surface, Form 
and Color should be among the first presented to the children, as they 
are essential in the making of pictures. Manner of presentation in 
each instance. Map representation, with the idea of scale; purposes 
of map representation; map of school-room floor; map of the school 
yard and vicinity. Study of the land and water forms in the home 
neighborhood. Slopes, Divides or Watersheds; Lines of Union of 
slopes or valleys. Study of the home stream; situation With refer- 
ence to slopes; dependence of streams upon slopes; study of source, 
banks, bed, mouth, tributaries. Pond, lake. Oral descriptions of 
large streams and lakes visited by the teacher. Sand modeling, pur- 
pose, advantage. Climate: why summer is warmer than winter. The 
atmosphere: effect of heat and cold on the atmosphere. Evaporation, 
condensation, rain, hail, snow, frost, dew, fog. Circulation of the 
water: history from leaving the ocean until its return; show how it 
benefits man. Study of vegetation of home neighborhoods; why? 
Kinds, uses. Study of animals of home neighborhood; why? Kinds, 
habits, how beneficial to man. Minerals; kinds, uses, mines, miners. 
Races of men; white, black, yellow, brown; homes of different races, 
customs, manners, occupations, education, religion, government. 
Home town: shape, size, surface, drainage, climate, crops, animals, 
manufactures, railroads, notions of commerce, exports and imports; 
causal relations dwelt upon. Home county as above; county seat: no- 
tions of government, in the home, in the school, in the community, in 
the county. Home state as above; capital, shape, surface, principal 
rivers, direction of rivers determined by surface, principal crops, 
principal varieties of trees, uses; animals, benefits to man. Principal 
cities, with reason for the selection made; why the principal cities are 
so located; principal manufactures in those cities; commerce, showing 
chief exports and imports. 

GRAMMAR GRADES. Astronomical Geography. 

Definition of terms. Shape of the earth: proofs of its rotundity; 
proofs of its oblateness. 

Motions of the earth and their consequences; rotation on axis; day 
and night; axis; poles; equator; parallels; meridians; latitude; longi- 
tude; zenith; nadir; vertical line of observer; horizon; revolution around 
the sun; earth's orbit: plane of earth's orbit. 

Declination of earth's axis; relation of declination of axis to posi- 
t ion of the tropics; polar circles, a nd width of zones; relation tocircle of 



ILLINOIS STATE NOKMAL UNIVERSITY. ' 17 

light, diurnal circle, change of seasons, and to difference in length of 
days. Tests. Study of South America. Position, size, shape, contour, 
relief, drainage, climate, effects of altitude upon climate; principal 
trees, plants, crops; principal animals (wild and domestic); inhabitants, 
with brief treatment of their origin, customs, homes, governments, 
etc. Sketch principal river systems. Study the different countries 
with their capitals and a few other leading cities. What render the 
cities important. What the continent produces for exportation. What 
it imports. Relation of production and commerce to climate. 

Great Britain and Ireland. Close relation of the United States and 
Great Britain. Importance of the kingdon; small in area, but great in 
power and wealth. Outline; surface; principal rivers; climate; crops; 
manufactures; commerce. Principal cities noted for manufactures; 
for commerce; as educational centers; centers of historical interests; 
connected with famous literary works. Reasons for more manufac- 
tures in some localties than others. Tracing cause and effect as far as 
possible. Sketch maps of important localities. 

Continental Europe. Position; rag-ged outline; importance of study 
of outline, or contour; benefits arising- from irregular coastline; sur- 
face; influence of surface upon climate, crops and manufactures; drain- 
age; influence of surface upon drainag-e; principal river systems 
sketched; climate; crops; dependence of crops upon climate. Study of 
different countries; comparative importance of each; in what respect 
important; productions, such as minerals, crops, domestic animals, and 
manufactures. Principal cities; for what noted, mauufactures, 
commerce, schools, and historical events. Governments, customs, 
homes, etc. 

Asia. Outline; relief; back-bone of Asia-Europe; drainage (princi- 
pal rivers only); climate, effect of great plateaus and high mountain 
barriers upon climate and vegetation, and consequently upon civiliza- 
tion; great forests; great deserts; great plains. Study different coun- 
tries briefly, their principal productions; commercial importance; 
leading cities, principal exports, imports. The people; their govern- 
ment; religion; homes; customs; food; education; etc. Make sketch- 
maps. 

Africa and Oceanica. Studied after the same general plan as 
Asia, but more briefly, excepting Australia, which, because of its im- 
portance, is studied somewhat carefully. 

Much map-sketching and sand-modeling throughout the entire 
course, and constant effort to get pupils to think of forms of real land 
and water, instead of being satisfied with thinking of symbols, simply. 



18 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. 

What Geography should mean: Comparative Physical Geography: 
physical life of the globe, nature of this life; how it differs from or- 
ganic life. 

Anatomy of the globe; importance of forms of contour and relief, 
and of relative position; importance shown by giving illustrations 
indicating their influence upon climate, vegetation, animal life, and 
industries, and upon civilization, in general. Analogies of the gen- 
eral forms of the continents; Guyot's seven laws of relief; value of 
the laws. Distribution of the plains, plateaus, and mountains in the 
different continents. Volcanoes; their cause; position; linear arrange- 
ment. Theory of earthquakes; history and description of a few of 
the principal ones. Contour and depths of the oceans. 

Physiology of the continental forms: Law of the development 
of life; this law in accord with Laplace's theory of the development of 
the earth; also with the evolution of human society. Three epochs of 
development; the insular, the maritime, and the continental. The 
formula of development the same for each continent, the entire globe, 
and for vegetable and animal life. A few lessons on elementary geol- 
ogy; formation of coal; glacial epochs, etc. 

Three grand contrasts: Contrast of continental and sea climates. 
Reasons for difference; results of difference as revealed in the animal 
and vegetable kingdoms. The atmosphere; composition; weight; the 
mediator between the continents and the oceans; the bond of society; 
g-eneral theory of the winds; the trade winds; monsoons; hurricanes; 
cyclones, etc. Transportation of the waters from the oceans to the 
interior of the continents, and their return to the oceans; the winds, 
the water carriers; influence of mountains on distribution of rains; on 
position of deserts; fertile plains, etc. The tides; cause; benefits. 
Ocean currents; cause; effect on climate; etc. 

Contrast of the Old World and the New; description of each: one 
the complement of the other; good results of a union of the two. 

Contrast of the three continents of the North and the three of the 
South. Consequences of the proximity of the northern continents, as 
seen in the vegetation and animals; consequences of the isolation of 
the southern continents. 

Increase of life from the poles to the equator; man an exception; 
law of the distribution of the human race; geographical center of man- 
kind; advantage of the temperate climate for the improvement of man. 
The continents on the north the theater of history; conflict between 
the regions north and south of the line of highest elevation in Asia- 
E/urope; result of the conflict as shown by history. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 19 

Contrast of the East and West; different forms of civilization 
largely due to geographical environment. The geographical march 
of history; close relation between this march and the geographical 
features of the globe. Numerous illustrations. 

UNITED STATES HISTORY. 
Professional. — Attention called to the material to be used, and to the 
manner of presenting it to the pupils of the lower grades. 
Primary Grades. — Material. 1. Fairy Tales. 

2. Bible stories. — {a) Characters of whose childhood and youth 
most is known; Joseph; Moses; Samuel; David; Jesus; etc. (h) Abra- 
ham; Jacob; Daniel; Paul, etc. 

3. Stories of adventures. — 1. Those that occurred near home; {a) ex- 
perience of hunters; fishermen, travelers, {b) Dangers from floods; 
deep snows; high winds; prairie fires, etc. 2. Those that occurred re- 
mote from home. On the railroads; in stages; on steam boats, etc. 

4. Stories about Indians. — Their dress; homes; canoes; hunting ex- 
peditions; war expeditions; cruelty to prisoners; sports of the children, 
etc. 

5. Explanation of national holidays. — Fourth of July; Memorial 
Day; Thanksgiving Day; Washington's birthday. 

6. Biographies. — Washington; Columbus; Eincoln; Grant; Sher- 
man; Sheridan; etc. 

Method of Presentation. — 1. At first, the teacher must tell the stories. 
The children must not be expected to repeat them. 2. Eater on, the 
teacher may read some of the stories, although it is better to tell them, 
and the children should be expected to reproduce them in their own 
language; orally at first, later in writing. The stories can be made 
the texts for the work in language. 

Purpose of the Work.—l. To awaken a historical spirit. 2. To culti- 
vate the imagination. 3. To aid in character building. 

Intermediate Grades. — Material. Biographies. 

Discoveries. — Columbus; the Cabots; Americus Vespucci; Cartier; 
Hudson. 

Explorers. — De Soto; Champlain;Ea Salle. John Smith; Eewis and 
Clarke; John C. Fremont. 

Colonizers. — Raleigh; Roger Williams; Lord Baltimore; William 
Penn; Oglethorpe. 

Pioneers and Indian Fighters. — Miles Standish; Daniel Boone; 
"Kit" Carson. 

Statesmen. — Benjamin Franklin; Thomas Jefferson; Alexander 
Hamilton; Daniel Webster; Henry Clay; Abraham Eincoln. 

Generals. — Washington; Greene; Scott; Grant; Sherman; Sheridan. 



20 ANNUA I, CATALOGUE 

'•Naval Officers. — Isaac Hull; Decatur; Perry; Farragut. 

Inventors. — Whitney; Fulton; Morse; McCormick; Howe, etc. 

History of Typical Colonies. — Plymouth; New York; Rhode Island; 
Maryland; Pennsylvania; Georgia. 

Social condition of the people at different periods. — Troubles with 
the Indians; manner of living-; homes; clothing; customs; social usages. 

Wars. — King Philip's War. French and Indian War: Ticonderoga; 
Quebec. Revolutionary War; Bunker Hill; Valley Forge; Yorktown. 
War of 1812: Lundy's Lane; New Orleans. Mexican War: Buena Vista; 
Cerro Gordo. The Civil War: Fort Sumter; Merrimac and Monitor; 
Malvern Hill; Gettysburg; Vicksburg; The Wilderness; Surrender of 
L,ee. 

Method — A text-book may be used, but better results will be ob- 
tained without, if the teacher be prepared. The narrative form should 
be preserved throughout. There should be a vivid picturing of men 
and events. Pictures and brief historical poems will add much to the 
interest and value of the work. 

Grammar Grades. — Material. 1. A good text-book on the subject. 
2. One or two histories of the United States, more extended than the 
text, for reference. 3. A few historical novels noted for the vividness 
and truthfulness of their descriptions. 4. Collection of poems founded 
on incidents of American history. 

Method. — Frequent reference should be made to the work in the 
preceding grades. The narrative form should still be used. Atten- 
tion-should be given to the causes which led to important results. 
The virtues of the people should be pointed out. Their resistance to 
oppression, their sacrifices for the right, and their moderation in vic- 
tory, should be commended. Throughout the entire work, the patri- 
otism of the fathers should be held up for the emulation of their 
sons, and the truth should be emphasized that there can be no true 
freedom where there is not a cheerful obedience to law. 

Academic. — Condition of Europe at time of discovery of America. 
1. Granada conquered by Ferdinand and Isabella. 2. The "War of 
the Roses," in England, closed shortly before by the Battle of Bos- 
worth. 3. Eve of the Reformation. 4. Sad condition of the common 
people. 

Claims of the Northmen considered. 

Columbus. — Youth; manhood; seeking for aid; aid obtained; the 
first voyage; land discovered; return to Spain; reception at Barcelona; 
effect of discovery on Europe; other voyages; results; old age; misfor- 
tunes; injustice; death. 

Other Spanish discoverers and explorers. 



II.IJNOIS STATE NOKMAI, UNIVERSITY. 21 

-, ^English discoverers and explorers — The Cabots; Drake; John 
Smith, etc. 

French discoverers and explorers — Verrazani; Cartier; Champlain; 
EaSalle; Marquette; the Jesuit Fathers. 

Dutch discoverers. 

Colonization — Spain in the south; England in the center; France 
in the north, south, and west. 

Growth of the colonies — English colonies surpass the others in 
wealth and numbers. 

Troubles— Between English and Spanish colonies. Between Eng- 
lish and French colonies. Nearly all of these troubles grew out of the 
troubles in Europe. 

French and Indian War — Cause; principal events; results; train- 
ing school for Revolutionary War. 

Internal troubles of English colonies — Indians; religious troubles; 
local jealousies. 

Eife in the colonies — Religion; education; homes; dress; customs; 
industries; mode of travel; social usages; growth in wealth and popu- 
lation. 

Revolutionary War — Remote causes; immediate causes; principal 
events; principal actors; self-control of the people; respect for law. 
.. • •< , >^The Building of the Nation" — Articles of Confederation; their 
insufficiency; danger of disintegration; making the Constitution; the 
Constitution contrasted with the Articles of Confederation. 

Growth of the Nation — The president; financial policy fixed; in- 
ternal troubles; foreign policy fixed; troubles with France; troubles 
with Barbary States; troubles with England. 

War of 1812 — Causes; principal events; results. 

Admission of States. 

Inventions. 

Railroads. 

Development of material resources. 

Slavery. —Introduction; legislation affecting slavery. 

Mexican War. — Cause; principal events; results; acquisition of ter- 
ritory; discovery of gold in California; result of the discovery. 

The Civil War.— Cause; principal events; results; abolition of 
slavery; the "New South." 

History of the Nation Since the Civil War. — Admission of States; 
political parties; political policies; labor movements; progress in the 
arts and sciences; achievements in literature; stud}- of political and 
domestic economy; general prosperity-. 



22 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

CIVIL GOVERNMENT. 

Man, a social being; society the natural state in which to live, 
hence the necessity of government; right of society to govern its in- 
dividual members; the object. Government in the family; in the 
school; its purpose, nature and necessity. 

Town Government. — Review system of United States land survey. 
Distinction between a town and a township; the civil town; character 
of its government; departments; officers constituting each depart- 
ment; manner of election; the Australian ballot system; term of 
office; duties; pay; town meeting; time; business; antiquity of town- 
ship government; origin and history of the New England township. 
Pure democracy. 

County Government. — Departments; officers constituting each; 
manner of election; time; duties; the county board; meetings; powers; 
relation of the county to the state; origin of the county; history of 
the New England and Virginia county. Representative democracy. 

State Government. — Historical sketch of Illinois; the Northwest 
Territory; ordinance of 1787; influence on the history of the State; 
Illinois as a Territory; admission as a State; legal boundaries; three 
constitutions; government provided for by the constitution of 1870; 
relation of constitution to constitution of the United States. Legis- 
lative department; legal title; senatorial districts; advantages of two 
houses; qualifications; pay; officers of each house; powers and privi- 
leges of members; duties and obligations; minority representative plan; 
advantages claimed. Executive department; consists of what officers; 
qualifications of each; time and manner of election; duties; term of 
office; pay; responsibility. Judicial department; consists of what courts; 
jurisdiction of each; original and appellate jurisdiction; judicial dis- 
tricts and circuits; judges of each; juries: grand and petit; duties. 
State boards; duties; state institutions, name, location, purpose, sup- 
port and government. How taxes are levied for state, county, town 
and district purposes; equalization of taxes. Duties of the citizen to 
to the State; duties of the State to the citizen. 

Government of the United States. Thorough review of the United 
States History as a basis for the work. Government of the colonics; 
relation of the colonies to each other and to England; the Revolu- 
tionary War; Declaration of Independence; Articles of Confederation; 
need of a stronger bond; steps leading to formation of constitu- 
tion; advantages over The Articles; opposition; ratification; origin 
of American political parties Legislative department; compare with 
British Parliament; how each house is constituted; qualifications elec- 
t ion, term, pay, privileges, and obligations of members; when Congress 
convenes; life of one Congress; number of sessions; manner of trans- 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 23 

acting- business; committees, journals, etc.; power of Congress in re- 
gard to taxes; how the government is supported; purposes of tariff; 
history of the tariff legislation; commerce; naturalization; bankruptcy; 
money; financial doctrines; banking systems; postal matters; patents; 
copyright; piracy; war; armies; militia; territories; immigration; the 
writ of habeas corpus; bills of attainder; ex post facto laws; a study of En- 
glish history bearing on these facts; titles of nobility; prohibitions on 
the states; rights of the states; implied powers of Congress. Executive 
departments; power vested in whom; ability to execute the laws; quali- 
fication of the President; manner of nominating and electing the Pre- 
sident; his term of office; pay; the Cabinet; responsibility; comparison 
with English and French cabinets; functions of the different; depart- 
ments; principal bureaus in each; civil-service reform. Judicial depart- 
ment; consists of what courts; appointment of judges; tenure of office; 
comparison with State judiciary; advantages and disadvantages of 
each system; necessity of Federal courts; danger of clashing with 
State courts. Amendments; purpose; further safeguards around the 
rights of individuals; religious liberty; freedom of speech and of the 
press; right of petition; to bear arms; to be secure in person and papers; 
trial by jury; abolition of slavery; civil rights; impartiality in the elec- 
tive franchise. 

ANCIENT HISTORY. 

What history is; what it treats of ; sources; "monuments, relics and 
records;" aids to history — ethnology, archeology; philology. Divi- 
sions of history; history a continuous whole. Races of mankind; the 
historical race; its divisions. Geographical sketch of the ancient 
oriental nations; historical darkness in Northern Asia; twilight in Cen- 
tral Asia; sunlight in Western Asia. 

Hindoostan. Aryans; early home; migration; plains of the Indus 
and Ganges; conquest of non-Aryans; caste; purpose; effect; religion- 
sacred books; arts; sciences. 

China. The Turanians; early home; migration; conquests; Con- 
fucius; education; civil service; non-intercourse; effect on civilization; 
present condition; the Chinese in the United States. 

Egypt. Geography; influence of the Nile; reason for rise of the 
Nile; brief histories of the dynasties; the pyramid builders; Shepherd 
kings; the Hebrews in Egypt; Seti; Rameses II; Necho; conquest by 
the Persians; Greeks; the Ptolomies; Cleopatra; conquest by Rome; 
religion; tombs; Sphinxes; arts; sciences. Supplementary reading: 
Wilkinson's "Ancient Egyptians;" Eber's "Uarda," and Shakespeare's 
"Anthony and Cleopatra." 

Chaldaea. Description of Tigro-Euphrates basin; the Hamites; 
Semites; civilization; education; books and libraries; religion; arts; 



24 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

science. Supplementary reading": Bible history and the "Builders of 
Babel." 

Assyria. Chaldean Colony; growth; power; Sargbn; Sennacherib: 
intercourse with the Hebrews: civilization; arts; sciences; Nineveh: 
Bible history; Byron's "Destruction of Sennacherib." 

Babylonia. Overthrow of Assyrian power; Nebuchadnezzar; De- 
struction of Tyre; Captivity of the Jews; Splendor, strength and 
downfall of Babylon; Cyrus the Great; modern researches. Supple- 
mentary reading: Bible history; Rawlinson's "Six Great Monarchies 
of the Ancient Eastern World." 

The Hebrews. Semites; importance in history; our indebtedness 
to them; their orig-in; Abraham; Jacob; Joseph; Moses; the Exodus: 
Judges; kings; captivity; destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans: 
present condition. 

Phoenicia. Geography; government; Tyre and Sidon: colonizers: 
commerce; alphabet; diffusers of civilization. 

Persia. Geography; Medes and Persians; Aryans; Astyag'es; Cy- 
rus; Cambyses; Darius I; Revolt of the Asiatic Ionians; Marathon; 
Xerxes, etc.; Alexander the Great; government; religion; art; sci- 
ences. 

Greece. Geography, in full; influence of its geography on its his- 
tory. People; legendary age, a shadowy period; the Heroes. Argo- 
nautic expedition; twelve labors of Hercules; Golden fleece; Trojan 
War; modern explorations of Schliemann. Religion: the twelve great 
deities; minor deities; character of gods; improvement on eastern 
gods; Elysian fields; oracles; sacred games; influence of games on 
civilization; Amphictyonic council; sacred wars. Government; kings: 
Oligarchies; Archons; Tyrants. Sparta: Classes, Ivycurgus; govern- 
ment; lands; money; occupations: institutions; education; Messenian 
wars: Tyrteus. Athens: Codrus; Draco; Solon; Public Assembly; Ex- 
pulsion of Tyrants; Clisthenes; ostracism. Wars with Persia; Mara- 
thon. (Read account of battle in Creasy's Fifteen Decisive Battles). 
Aristides: Themistocles; Thermopylae; value of Thermopylae to us; 
Athens destroyed: Salamis ( Read Byron's poem: The Isles of Greece): 
Plataea; treachery of Pausanius; memorials: trophies. Rebuilding 
the walls of Athens; jealousy of Sparta; Confederacy of Delos; effect 
on Athens; "Age of Pericles;" strength and weakness of Athens. Pe- 
loponnesian War; cause; character; principal events; pestilence in 
Athens; Peace of Nicias; Alcibiades; Sicily; defeat; close of the war; 
effect on Athens. Spartan supremacy; abuse of power; Theban su- 
premacy; Epaminondas; keuctra; Mantinea. The Ten Thousand; 
Cyrus; Clearchuv. Cunaxa; Xenophon; the retreat. Macedonian su- 
premacy; Character of Macedonians; Philip: effort of Demosthenes: 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 25 

Chaeronea; Alexander; Wars in the North; Issus; Thebes; Invasion 
of Asia; Granicus; Tyre; Egypt; Alexandria; Arbela; Babylon, etc.; 
Bactria; India; down the Indus; desert of Gedrosia; Babylon; death; 
burial; influence of conquests; division of empire; history of each 
division. Arts and sciences. Architecture; sculpture; painting-; 
poetry; great poets; great epic; compare with English and Italian 
epics; lyrics; compare with English lyrics; drama and great dramatists; 
compare with English drama; history and historians; orators and ora- 
tory; compare with Webster, Pitt, etc. Philosophy and philosophers; 
comparison of deductive and inductive reasoning; the Stoics; Epi- 
cureans; influence of Greek philosophy on modern thought. Mathe- 
matics; astronomy; geography; social life; education; position of 
women; theatrical entertainments; banquets; Symposia; slavery; 
homes; domestic economy. The Greeks, the schoolmasters of the 
world. 

Rome. — Geography of Italy; people; beginnings of Rome; legends; 
the kings; expulsion of the kings; efforts to regain power (Read 
Macaulay's "Horatius" ). Religion; comparison with the religion of 
the Greeks; Lares and Penates. Social classes; names of Romans. 
The Republic; officers; senate; first cession of the Plebs; cause; re- 
sults; Coriolanus ( Read Shakespeare's "Coriolanus" ); Cincinnatus; 
"The Cincinnatus of the West;" the Decemvirs; their work; miscon- 
duct (Read Macaulay's "Virginia"); overthrow; Military Tribunes; 
*. Censors; destruction of Rome bv the Gauls; Rome rebuilt; death of 
"Manlius; laws of Licinius Stolo; effect on Rome; Samnite wars; re- 
volt of the Eatin cities; war with Pyrrhus; cause; events; results; 
First Punic War; Rome and Carthage compared; cause of war; Sicily; 
Rome builds fleets; Regulus; close of war. Second Punic War; Han- 
nibal; Spain; Saguntum; the Alps; Ticinus; Trebia; Trasimenus: 
Fabius the delayer; the American Fabius; Cannae; Capua; Metaurus 
(Read account of battle in Creasey's "Fifteen Decisive Battles"'); 
Zama; close of the war; results. Third Punic War; cause; Masinissa; 
perfidy of Rome; defense of Carthage; destruction. War with Mace- 
don; conquest of Greece; destruction of Corinth; compare with de- 
struction of Carthage and Numanti. The Servile War; cause; result; 
public lands; the Gracchi; fate. Jugurthine war; briber}-; Marius; 
Sulla. The Cimbri and Teutones; destruction of the barbarians. The 
Social War; cause; results. The Civil War; Mithridates; conflict be- 
tween Marius and Sulla; flight of Marius; return; ferocity; death; re- 
turn of Sulla; proscriptions; death. Pompey the Great in Spain; the 
Gladiators; defeat; destruction; Ferres in Sicily; conquest of Pirates 
by Pompey; Mithridates; description of Roman triumph; Catiline; 
Cicero. The First Triumvirate; Duumvirate; rivalry; Caesar in Gaul; 
Great Britain; the Rubicon; flight of Pompey; Pharsalus; death of 



26 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

Pompey; Caesar in Egypt; Pontus; Thapsus; death of Caesar; funeral 
oration; fate of the conspirators; Caesar as a statesman; (Read Shake- 
speare's "Julius Caesar" ). The Second Triumvirate; Antony and 
Cleopatra; Antony and Octavius; Actium; founding of the Empire; 
Augustus. Rome, the law giver of the world. 

MEDIEVAL HISTORY. 

Rome under Augustus; boundaries of the empire; nature of the 
government; public buildings; education; literature; social conditions; 
the birth of Christ. Tiberius; the crucifixion of Christ. Nero; Ves- 
pasian; the taking of Jerusalem; Titus; the destruction of Herculaneum 
and Pompeii; Trajan; the Antonines; Diocletian; persecution of the 
Christians; Constantine the Great; Christianity favored; Constanti- 
nople; Julian the Apostate. 

The Goths; Theodosius; Alaric; Attila and the Huns; Genseric and 
the Vandals; fall of the western Roman Empire; influence of the fall 
upon the history of the world. Clovis and the Franks; other Teutonic 
tribes; conversion; monasticism;. fuson of the Latin and Teutonic peo- 
ple; the three elements of civilization. 

Mohammed and the Saracens; conquests, east, west, and north; con- 
tract with the eastern Roman Empire; conquests of Spain; invasion of 
France; battle of Tours; result. The Crusades; cause; history; results; 
influence on civilization. Charlemagne; dominion; purpose; achieve- 
ments. The Northmen and their aggressions. Rise of the Papal 
power; mission of Rome; the great schism; the iconoclasts; feudalism; 
chivalry. 

The Celts in Britain; the Romans; the Saxons; rivalry between the 
Celtic and the Roman church; the Heptarchy; the Danes; Alfred the 
Great; Dunstan; Edward the Confessor; the Norman conquests; influ- 
ence of the conquest upon the history of England; conflict of kings and 
the church; Thomas a Becket; conquest of Ireland; Magna Charta; first 
parliament; wars with the French; wars with Scotland; War of the 
Roses; the Tudors; Henry VIII and the Reformation; Mary I; Elizabeth; 
literature of the period; the Spanish Armada. The Stuarts; James I, 
and the colonization of America; trouble with the Puritans; war be- 
tween Charles I and parliaments; Cromwell; the restoration; the revolu- 
tion <»f 1689; cause; result; effect upon American colonies. 

France; Germany; Spain; Italy; Luther and the Reformation in 
Germany; Loyola and the Jesuits. Rise and growth of the Ottoman 
Empire; invasion of the eastern Roman Empire; downfall of Constan- 
tinople; influence of tali upon Europe. Growth of cities; conflict be- 
tween cities and nobility. Printing. Discovery of America. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 27 



DRAWING.— Two Years, Two Lessons Per Week. 

1. Aim— 1. To teach Drawing- as a language. 2. To lead pupils to 
seek culture from the beautiful in nature and art. 3. To promote 
mental development. 

2. General Points. — 1. Drawing- a language. 2. Drawing based upon 
form study. 3. Three divisions of drawing as to use: Drawing show- 
ing construction. Drawing showing appearance. Drawing of the 
enrichment or decoration. 4. An object may be pictured by represent- 
ing its outline, its light and shade, or its color. 

3. Form Study. — In clay, (a) Natural objects: Fruits, leaves, veg- 
etables, {b) Geometric Forms; Sphere, cube, cylinder. 

4. Drawing. — Suggestions for movement and position. Geometric 
views. Construction Drawing. 

Color — 1. Source of color. 2. Use of color. 3. Effect of color. 4. 
Theory of color. 5. Color harmony. 6. Drawing in color: 1. From 
nature. 2. From common objects. 

DRAWING.— Second Year. 

History. Architecture. Ornament. 

Ancient Period. — Egyptian school. Greek school. Roman school. 

Mediceval Period. — Byzantine school. Saracenic school. Gothic 
school. - 

Modern. — Renaissance. 

Pupils make drawings of the characteristic elements of construc- 
tion and ornamentation. 

Light and shade (with pencil ). From cast. From nature. From 
common objects. From models. 

Illustrative drawing. From nature; cast; copy. This work is an 
effort to acquire skill in rapid illustrative work, and the material is 
gathered from any source. 

PENMANSHIP. 

Outline of work. 

Aim. — 1. To fix clearly in the minds of the pupils the following- 
fundamental ideas: 1. To write well requires a correct conception of 
what is to be written. 2. Ability to execute that conception .with 
pen, pencil, or crayon. 3. This ability must be gained through care- 
ful practice, for it is an acquired habit, and habit comes from repeti- 
tion. 4. The practice must be careful, else, instead of eliminating, 
the pupil will only be confirming a faulty habit. 5. It requires but 
little time to acquire a correct mental picture of a letter compared 
with the time required to train the muscles to make it rapidly and 



28 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

easily. Hence, b}- far, the greater share of the time should be de* 
voted to training- the muscles. 6. Movement is the mainspring of any 
good writing system, and the muscular movement is by all authorities 
conceded to be the best. 7. -To improve writing - , we must improve 
our habits of making the individual letters. To do this, the best way 
is to repeat the same letter in an exercise with constant effort at im- 
provement. 

II. To make the transition — for with most pupils it is a transition 
— to muscular movement, and give as much drill as the time will 
permit in movement exercises for the purpose of securing control of 
this movement. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

Purpose: 

1. To furnish relief from mental effort. 2. To develop a robust 
physique. 3. To correct unequal development and faulty carriag-e of 
body. 4. In some measure to secure gracefulness. 5. To prepare the 
student to assist his own pupils physically as well as mentally. 

The work: 

1. Free Gymnastics throughout the year. 2. Apparatus work dur- 
ing- the Winter Term and part of the Fall and Spring Terms, work 
with pulleys, on bars, horse, ladders, ropes and poles. 3. Games for 
children and Delsarte work part of Spring and Fall Terms. 

Although the work is done in classes an effort is made to adapt it 
to the individual needs. The classes meet twice per week. 

For the apparatus work a special suit is necessary, costing from 
$3.00 to $6.00. Flannel (navy blue or black) is the best material for 
this purpose. It is better to have it made after arrival. 

VOCAL MUSIC. 

1. Methods of instruction in elements of vocal music. 

2. Practice in reading in five keys. 

3. Philosophy of transposition. 

4. Choral practice. 

GRAMMAR. 

Relation of thought to language. Nature of a thought and a sen- 
tence. Simple, complex and compound thoughts and the correspond- 
ing forms of sentences. Classification of sentences on the basis of 
relation of speaker to listener. Simple, complex and compound ideas 
necessitating- words and phrases. The clause, and the thought form 
thai gives rise to it. Principal and subordinate ideas in the thought 

and the modified and modifying elements in the sentence. Objects, 



ITXINOIS STATE NORMA!, UNIVERSITY. 29 

attributes and relations, ideas of them, and the language forms ex- 
pressing- these ideas. Nature of each part of speech. Analysis of 
some short classical selection. Constant drill in application. Method 
of induction followed, the laws being- the outcome of the direct exam- 
ination of numbers of all varieties of thought and language forms 
discussed. The last three weeks of the term are devoted to a discus- 
sion of the necessary incidental work and of how to select, arrange 
and present the language work proper to the primary grades. 

Third Term. Etymology. Each part of speech discussed fully. 
Double nature and function of words. Modification within the word. 
English idioms, their growth from natural expressions and their ele- 
ments. A thorough study of a standard selection from the standpoint 
of grammar. A term essay on some grammatical subject. 

The last three weeks are given to a discussion of method in lan- 
guage work in the intermediate and grammar grades. 

OUTLINE OF WORK IN RHETORIC. 

1. Principles controling the Choice of Words. 

2. The Nature and Structure of the Sentence. 

3. The Nature and Structure of the Paragraph. 

4. The Whole Composition: The choice of subject, Plan, Devel- 
opment. 

5. Processes of Composition: Description, Narration, Exposition, 
Argumentation. 

An effort is made to awaken ;he critical instinct in the hope of se- 
curing three ends: A purer diction of speech: a greater enjoyment of 
good English in books; and an appreciation of the fundamental quali- 
ties of good composition, — unity, directness, clearness, and simplicity. 
Constant practice is given in working out special problems of composi- 
tion. 

LITERATURE. 

The work in Literature runs through three terms, one of which is 
given up wholly to the drama. Twenty-seven weeks are left, there- 
fore, for the study of the whole body of English literature. Very little 
of this time can be spared for the study of mere literary history. A 
text-book, either Stopford Brooke's Primer of English Literature, or 
Shaw's New History of English and American Literature, revised edi- 
tion, is put into the hands of pupils to be used for reference, and the 
library is freely drawn upon for the same purpose. 

We prefer to the historical hand-book the careful study of a few 
authors in their best works. The works thus studied are chosen for 
typical excellence; that is, as well representing the author himself, his 
period, and a type of literature. Through the study of these works we 



30 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

seek acquaintance with individual authors, with literary forms, and 
with the relation of literature to life. Some change is made from year 
to year in the authors and works chosen, but every year we make a 
study of the drama, the epic, the narrative poem, or the minor epic, 
various minor poetic forms, the essay, the novel, and the argumenta- 
tive speech. 

During - the year 1897-8 the works studied have been Chaucer: The 
Prologue, and The Knight's Tale; Spenser: The Fairy Queen, Book 
I, cantos 1 and 2; Shakespeare: Macbeth, Hamlet, King Lear, Richard 
II., and As You Like It; Marlowe: Edward II.; Milton: Paradise 
Lost, I-IL; Carlyle: Sartor Resartus; Thackeray: Henry Esmond; 
George Eliot: Silas Marner; Matthew Arnold: Sohrab and Rustum; 
Tennyson: The Idylls of the King; Scott: Kenilworth; Wordsworth: 
Selected Poems. Of these works those by Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, 
Wordsworth, and George Eliot, together with three of the plays from 
Shakespeare, and Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum, have received detailed 
study in the class-room. The rest have all been read by all the mem- 
bers of the class; four critical essays have been prepared upon them 
by each member of the class, and have been presented before the class, 
where they have formed the basis of discussions, lasting several da3's. 

SHAKESPEARE AND MARLOWE. 

1. Plays read: Macbeth, King Lear, Hamlet, As You Like It, 
Richard II, and Marlowe's Edward II. 

2. Object sought: An intelligent reading of dramatic literature. 

3. Points emphasized: 1. The Drama is Literature, not Philoso- 
phy, not Ethics, not History; yet, the Drama is philosophical, ethical, 
historical. 2. Whatever philosphical, ethical, or historical lessons 
the drama has to teach, these lessons are best reached through a sym- 
pathetic study of the Drama as Literary Form. Therefore, in the first 
dramas read, we follow closely the Dramatic Construction, observing 
the Induction of the action, the Development, the Climax, the Evolu- 
tion, and the Catastrophe. 

4. Along- with Dramatic Construction, and belonging to it, we 
study Characterization; Dramatic Motives; Dramatic Dialogue; Solilo- 
quy; Sequence of Scenes of Actions; Dramatic Illusion; Dramatic 
Time; Tragic Retribution; Differences between Tragedy and Comedy. 
After the class has become somewhat accustomed to following the 
dramatic development of an action, less close attention is paid to this 
in class, and we proceed at once to the characterization and motiving, 
and the consideration of the play as a revelation of life. 

5. Macbeth, As You Like It, and Hamlet were read in the class- 
room and discussed at length. The others were read in private by all 
the members of the class; essays were then prepared by all; two or 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 31 

three of these essays were read in class and formed the basis of a 
general discussion lasting- two or three days for each play. In all 
this work, the student is urged to postpone the reading- of commenta- 
tors until he has studied the plays themselves, and beg-un, at least, to 
form his own judg-ments. Independence of opinion, and a willingness 
to hold the judgment in suspense and wait for further light, are al- 
ways encouraged. 



Course in Natural Science. 



ZOOLOGY. 

1. Collection of Insects; Study of Insects; Principles of Classifica- 
tion developed by comparing and contrasting several kinds of Insects. 

2. The Crayfish, studied alive and then dissected (type of Crustacea). 

3. External characteristics of Birds. Analysis of Birds (Jordan's Man- 
ual). 4. Study of the following animals alive; dissection as types: (a) 
Earthworm (Vermes); (b) Clam ( Molluska ); (c) Perch (Pisces); {d) Frog 
(Batrachia); {e) Snaxe (Reptilia); (f) Pigeon (Aves); {g) Rabbit 
(Mammalia). 5. Study of live Hydra. 6. Study of a few Protozoa. 
7. Study of Starfish and Sea-urchin (alcoholic). 

Drawings and descriptions of animals studied preserved in perma- 
ment note-book. 

Text-books: Packard; Colton's Practical Zoology. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

1. Muscles. (1) Experiments on the Muscles in our bodies. (2) 
Models of Human Muscles. (3) Dissection of hind leg of rabbit. (4) 
Structure of Muscles, ( a ) gross; ( b ) minute. ( 5 ) Action of muscle ( ex- 
periment on frog's muscles). Training of Muscles ( symmetrical de- 
velopment ). 

2. Bone. (1) Bones as levers. (2). Bones as protectors ( brain and 
spinal cord ). ( 3 ) Bone structure, ( a ) gross; ( b ) microscopic. ( 4 ) Joints. 
{a) Dissection of joints of rabbit's leg, and beef joints. 

3. General Functions of the Nervous System, Sensation, and Mo- 
tion. 1. Experiments on frog, reflex action of the Spinal Cord. 2. 
Dissection of Spinal Cord and Brain of cat. 3. Voluntary Motion. 4. 
Sensation of Touch. 

4. Circulation. 1. External indications of the Circulation of Blood; 
Heart beat, pulse, blushing, pallor, experiments on veins, etc. («) 
Microscopic Examination of frog's blood, (b) Circulation of blood in 



32 ANNUAL CATALOG TK 

web of frog's foot under microscope. 2. Internal proofs of the Circu- 
lation of the Blood; (a) Dissection of heart and lungs (sheep or pig), 
(6.) demonstrative of the action of the heart, (c) injection of arteries, 
( d ) tracing injected arteries and veins. 3. Description of Organs of Cir- 
culation and their action, (a) Action of frog's heart, (b) action of the 
heart, (c) experiments illustrating the action of the large arteries, (d) 
action of the medium-sized arteries (plain muscle fiber), (e) veins 
(valves). 4. Blood and Lymph, {a) Miscroscopic examination of drop 
of blood from finger, ( b ) composition of blood, ( c ) coagulation of blood, 
( d) injection of thoracic duct (lymph). 5. Hygiene of Circulation. 

5. Respiration. 1. Organs of respiration. 2. Mechanical process 
of respiration. 3. Experiments illustrating respiration. 4. Capacity 
of the lungs. 5. Composition of air. 6. Experiments illustrating the 
chemistry of respiration. 7. Experiments showing the differences be- 
tween inspired and expired air. 8. Production of heat and motion in 
the body. 9. Comparison of the human body and a locomotive. 10. 
Hygiene of respiration. 

6. Excretion. 1. The Skin. Functions: (a) Excretory, (b) heat- 
regulating, (c) protective, [d) sensory, {e) absorptive. 2. The Kidneys, 
( a (dissection of pig's or sheep's kidneys, (b) action of the kidneys, (c) 
relation of the lungs, kidneys, and skin. 

7. Digestion. 1. Foods and cooking. 2, Dissection of the diges- 
tive organs of a cat. 3. Study of cross and longitudinal sections of 
teeth. 4. The salivary glands. 5. Experiments with artificial diges- 
tion. 6. Absorption. 7. Hygiene of digestion. 8. Taking "cold," 
diarrh(jea, bathing. 

8. The Nervous System. Functions of the Brain and Spinal Cord. 
Hygiene of the Nervous System. 

9. The special senses. Sight, {a) dissection of the eye, {b) ex- 
periments on accommodation, (c) experiments on blind spots, (d) 
experiments on color contrast, ( e ) experiments on adaptation to amount 
of light. Defects in vision. Hygiene of the Eyes. Smell and Taste. 
Hearing. The voice and speech. Dissections of the Earynx. 

Drawings and descriptions of dissections made in books. 
Text-book: Martin's Human Body (briefer course). 

BOTANY. 

1. Planting seeds ( corn and beans); their structure and growth. 
2. Buds, structure, protection, arrangements, kinds, growth. 3. Study 
of early flowers, Hepatica, Spring Beauty, Trillium, Blood-root, etc. 
Study of Types: 4. Green slime ( Protophyta ). 5. Moss ( Bryophyta). 
6. Fern and Horsetail ( Pteridophyta ). 7. Scotch Pine and Austrian 
Pine ( Gymnosperms ). 8. Common flowering plants ( Anglosperms ). 

If. rbarium required. Notes and drawing of plants studied. 

Text-book: Gray's School and Field Book. 



IUJNOIS STATK NORMAL UNIVERSITY. o3 

PHYSICS'.— First Term. 
The following- is a list of the exercises which are worked out ex- 
perimentally by the student, and recorded in a note-book. This labor- 
atory work is preceded by the study of a manual and by preliminary 
directions by the instructor, and is followed by the study of a text- 
book. Recitations are upon both experimental work and text. 

1. Mensuration. — 1. Length in metric units. 2. Relation between 
circumference and diameter of a circle. 3. Volume of an irregular 
body.' 4. Cross-section and diameter of a tube. 5. Weight of a cubic' 
centimeter of water. 6. Weight of a dollar and a dime. 

2. Derisity or Specific Gravity, Including Mechanics of Fluids. — 1. De- 
termination of density of a solid. 2. Specific gravity of a liquid by 
specific gravity bottle. 3. Weight lost by a body immersed in liquid. 

4. Specific gravity by immersion. 5. Floating bodies. 6. Liquid pres- 
sure due to weight. 7. Pressure on bottom of vessel. 8. Specific 
gravity of liquid by balancing columns. 9. Comparison of gases and 
liquids. 10. Measure atmospheric pressure — barometer. 11. Specific 
gravity of liquids by balancing against the atmospheric pressure. 
12. Boyle's law. 13. The siphon. 14. The "Hero's fountain." 

3. Mechanics of Solids, Dynamics. — 1. Action of a force upon a body. 
2. The force of friction. 3. Composition of forces. 4. Parallel forces. 

5. Action and reaction. 6. Comparison of masses by inertia. 7. Accel- 
erated motion. 8. Pendulum. 9. Levers. 10. Pulley. 11. Inclined 
plane. 12. Wedge and screw. 13. Tenacity. 14. Elasticity. 

4. Heat. — 1. Effect of heat upon size. 2. How heat travels. 3. Test- 
ing thermometers. 4. Temperature and physical form. 5. Laws of 
cooling. 6. Melting and boiling points. 7. Heat capacity 8. Deter- 
mination of specific heat. 9. Latent heat. 10. Coefficient of linear 
expansion. 11. Coefficient of expansion of gas. 12. Coefficient of ex- 
pansion of a liquid. 13. Absorption and radiation. 14. Solution. 

Second Term. 

5. Magnetism.— !. General study of a magnet. Action of attracted 
body on magnet. 3. Mutual action of two magnets. 4. Induced mag- 
netism and breaking magnets. 5. Law of induced magnets. 6. Lines 
of magnetic force. 7. Terrestrial magnetism. 8. Theory of magneti- 
zation. 

6. Static Electricity — 1. Mutual action of electrified bodies. 2. The 
pith-ball electroscope. 3. Transferring electrification. 4. Induced 
electrification. 5. Law of induction. 6. Charging by conduction. 7. 
Charging by induction. 8. The electrophorus. 9. The electrical ma- 
chine. 10. The condenser and Leyden jar. 11. Electromotive force, 
and resistance. 



24 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

7. Current Electricity. — 1. Production of current by chemical action. 
2. Conditions for producing- current. 3. Action of currents on mag- 
nets. 4. Conditions affecting resistance. 5. Effect of series and par- 
allel resistances. 6. Methods of connecting cells. 7. Resistance 
measured by substitution. 8. Resistance measured by Wheatstone 
Bridge. 9. Electro-magnetism. 10. Induced currents. 11. The dy- 
namo and motor. 12. The induction coil and telephone. 

8. Light. — 1. How light spreads from a center. 2. Intensity. 3. 
Shadows. 4. Images through small aperture. 5. Reflection from 
plane mirrors. 6. Curved mirrors. 7. Images from plane and curved 
mirrors. 8. Refraction and total reflection. 9. Refraction b) r lenses. 
10. Images from lenses. 11. The spectrum by dispersion. 

9. Sound. — 1. Vibratory and wave motion. 2. The vibration of 
strings. 3. Speed of sound waves. 4. Reinforcement. 5. Interfer- 
ence. 

Manual — Allen. Text — Avery. 

CHEMISTRY.— Third Term. 
The course consists of a systematic study of the most common 
elements and compounds, and the development of the laws and the- 
ories of chemistry. Students follow the direction of the text in doing 
work in the laboratory, and recite upon this experimental work. All 
processes, laws, and theories are illustrated and verified by experi- 
ment. Careful records of all work are kept in permanent notebooks. 
Reactions are shown by diagrams and equations. 

1. Elements and Compounds. — Iron, oxygen, iron oxide, phosphorus, 
phosphorus oxide, mercury, mercury oxide, carbon, carbon monoxide, 
carbon dioxide, hydrogen, water, sulphur, sulphur oxides, sulphurous 
acid, sulphuric acid, phosphoric acid, carbonic acid, zinc, zinc oxide, 
iron sulphide, hydrogen sulphide, iron sulphate, copper, copper oxide, 
magnesium, magnesium oxide, magnesium sulphate, calcium, calcium 
oxide ( quick lime ), calcium hydroxide ( slacked lime ), calcium sulphate 
(gypsum and plaster of Paris ), calcium carbonate (marble or chalk), 
sodium, sodium oxide, sodium hydroxide, sodium sulphate, sodium 
carbonate ( sal soda), sodium amalgam, chlorine, hydrochloric acid, 
sodium chloride ( salt), calcium chloride, potassium, potassium oxide, 
potassium hydroxide, potassium sulphate, nitrogen, nitrogen oxides, 
nitric acid, potassium nitrate (niter or saltpetre ), ammonia, ammo- 
nium hydroxide, ammonium chloride, ammonium sulphate, ammonium 
nitrate. 

2. I'rorcssrs. Laws and Theories. Analysis, synthesis, oxidation, re- 
duction, allot ropy, crystallization, reaction, metalhesis, deliquescence, 
efflorescence, neutralization, relation of acids, bast-sand salts, law of 
Boyle, law of Da 11 on (or Charles), law of conservation of mass, atomic 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 35 

theory, law of definite proportions by weight, law of multiple propor- 
tions, Prout's hypothesis, law of definite proportions by volume ( Gay- 
Lussac), molecular theory, hypothesis of Avogadro (or Ampere), 
theory of Dulong and Petit, periodic law ( Mendeleeff ). 
Text— White. 

ELEMENTS OF PEDAGOGY. — First Tear, First Term. Two Hours a 

Week. 

The purpose of this work is the introduction of those who have 
just entered the Normal School to the subject of Pedagogy. The stage 
of their professional scholarship necessitates the selection of subject 
matter that shall be simple and interesting. The course begins with 
two introductory lessons in which an attempt is made to show in what 
especial fields their study will lie, the way in which the child has been 
regarded, generally, in the older systems of education, and a few defi- 
nitions which are intended to set certain limits to the work of the term. 

Following- these lessons come discussions of the general equipment 
of the average child when he enters school, the discipline through 
which he has acquired the equipment, the g-eneral principle of apper- 
ception; and the modern movement in child-study with its relation to 
the work of the teacher. 

In order to make clear the successive steps by which modern edu- 
cational ideas have made a place for themselves, the study of educa- 
tional reformers occupies the remainder of the term. 

Beginning with the Revival of Learning-, the educational ideas are 
carefully examined and their peculiar forms explained. The trans- 
formations of these ideas through the work of the reformers are studied 
and the contributions of Comenius, Rosseau, Pestalozzi, and Froebel 
are especially noted. The Orbis Pictus, Emile, and Leonard and Ger- 
trude are commented upon quite fully. 

The thought movement for the term is the introduction of the idea 
of sense training- by Comenius, and its historical development by the 
later reformers. 

PEDAGOGY.— First Year, Second Term. 
The work opens with Special Method in History, Literature for 
the eight grades and Reading, one term being- devoted to these sub- 
jects. It is the object of this work to discuss and illustrate the prin- 
ciples underlying- the arrangements of a complete course in History 
and Literature for the eight grades and the method of presenting such 
material to a class. Some time is spent in becoming acquainted with 
stories from history and literature that are suitable for children, as a 
basis for more intelligent discussion of their educative value. The 
teacher needs to be acquainted with many of the classic fair3 r stories, 



36 ANxr.u, CATALOGUE 

such as those prepared by Scudder, or the Grimm brothers; he should 
be familiar with the story of Robinson Crusoe, with many of the classic 
myths, and the Pioneer History Stories of America. 

This preliminary work is followed by a discussion of the text of 
McMurry's "Special Method in History and Literature." 

1. Introduction: The relation of Literature, as the great ethical 
power in culture, to the main aim of education, — character building,— 
to the cultivation of the child's aesthetic tastes, his sympathies, and 
powers of thought. Duty of the school in bringing- the influence of 
literature to bear upon the masses. Relation of school to home. 

2. Fairy Tales in First Grade: Sympathy between child and fairy 
tale. Popular objections to fairy stories. Their validity. The five 
requirements of a classic fairy story. The oral presentation of the 
fairy stories and their production by the children. Relation of the 
stories to the other work of the first year, e. g., as furnishing suggest- 
ive materials for drawing and language and as cultivating the power 
of oral speech. Relation of stories to first work in teaching reading. 
Discussions of the methods of teaching reading to beginners. 

3. Robinson Crusoe in the Second Grade. History of the story of 
Robinson Crusoe. Comparison with the Fairy Tales. Discussion of 
the moral, industrial, and economic value of the story. Relation of the 
story to the other work of the second year, especially to nature study, 
drawing, modeling, and language. Method of presentation suitable to 
the story of Robinson. 

4. Myths in the Third Grade: Definition of the myth. Distin- 
guished from the legend and history. How valued by literary artists. 
The characteristics of the myths and their value to child culture. 
Methods in teaching the myths. 

5. Pioneer History Stories in the Fourth and Fifth Grades: Tran- 
sition from the mythical to the historical hero. Child's interest in at- 
tractive biography. Lists of Pioneer History Stories suited to the 
Fourth and Fifth Grades. Character of the early pioneers of America. 
The value of oral presentation in history; method of oral presentation; 
reproduction of the stories by the pupil; difficulties in adopting an oral 
presentation of history stories. 

History in the Seventh and Eighth Grades: Full and detailed 
treatment of typical periods. Use of the biographical element. Ar- 
rangement of topics and relation of the history to the other work of 
these grade-.. 

The third month is devoted to Special Method in Reading. A num- 
ber of readers for the earlier grades, and of literary masterpieces 
suitable to the different grades, are read and discussed; 1. as to 
whether they meet the requirements of interesting and instructive 
thought content , and, 2, as to whether they are well adapted to advance 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 37 

the child in his mastery of the mechanical phase of reading-. The text 
of McMurry's "Special Method in Reading"," is then read and dis- 
cussed. Lists of classic literary masterpieces suited to the different 
grades are noted, and their culture values, both to the child and to the 
teacher, are discussed. The work is closed with some exposition of 
the method of teaching- reading in the different grades. 

In the work of Special Method illustrative lessons are given, 
making- use of some of the materials discussed. A few lessons, es- 
pecially in literature, are given before the students, by the assistant 
training- teacher, with a class of little children in the practice school. 
These lessons are made the subject of discussions on methods and de- 
vices employed. 

The "Special Method in Geography" is given in the reg-ular class 
work in g-eography, the last half of the first term being devoted to 
that purpose. 

PEDAGOGY.-F/rs< Year, Third Term. 

The first part of the term is devoted to a discussion of the Special 
Method in Teaching- Natural Science. Early in the term, the students 
are set to work to make observations upon some of the objects of 
nature about them, e. g. the red maple and the robin, for the purpose 
of acquiring some idea of the meaning and value of the direct observa- 
tion of nature, both as furnishing the basis for true scientific knowl- 
edge, and as a preparation for the work of teaching natural science. 
These objects are watched during- the spring months, and their develop- 
ment and habits noted daily, as accurately as possible. These observa- 
tions are later made the basis of a full discussion of the objects ob- 
served, for the purpose of illustrating- the principles of selection and 
treatment of materials in teaching- natural science to children. After 
these type objects have been fully treated, the principles involved are 
discussed as follows: 1. Selection of materials for nature stud}-. 2. 
Preparation of the teacher. 3. Excursions and observations by the 
children. 4. Methods and devices in the discussion of topics. 5. Type 
studies in natural science. 6. Value of nature study to the child and 
to the teacher. 

The remainder of the term is devoted to a discussion of the g-eneral 
laws underlying the method of instruction (or the so-called "Formal 
Steps of Instruction"), and of kindred pedagogical principles bearing- 
upon the work of the teacher in the class room. It is the aim of this 
work to show what the laws of thoug-ht are that determine how the 
teacher must present a subject to the class. For this work McMurrys' 
"Method of the Recitation" is used as a text. 



•*© 



38 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

PSYCHOLOGY.— First Term. 

1. Psychology and Its Relations to the teacher. 

2. The Educational Limitations of Psychology. 

3. The Treatment of Psychology adopted. 

4. The Bases of Psychical Life. ( a ) Sensation, (b) Interest. (<•) 
Impulse. 

5. The Psychical Processes, (a) Introduction: Classification of 
contents of our minds, (b) Classification of processes corresponding 
to these contents, (c) the processes. 1. Non voluntary attention. 
2. Association. 3. Voluntary attention. 4. Educational Principles. 
5. Apperception and Retention. 

6. Forms of Intellectual Development, (a) Principles of intellec- 
tual development, {b) Stages of intellectual development: 1. Train- 
ing of perception. 2. Training of the memory. Training of thought. 

7. The forms of Emotional Development. {<i) Conditions of inter- 
est, {b) Principles of emotional growth, (c) The forms, or stages of 
emotional growth. 

8. Forms of Volitional Development, (a) Factors of volitional 
development, {b) Stages of volitional department. 

9. Mind and Body, {a) Importance of body for soul. ( /; ) Struc- 
ture of nervous system in man. ( c) Elementary properties of nervous 
structure, (d) Psychological equivalents, (e) Localization of func- 
tion. (/) Educational principles. 

10. Summary of Principles, (n) Bases of instruction, (b) Ends of 
instruction, (c) Methods of instruction, (d) Relation of knowledge, 
feeling, and will, {e) Criticisms of maxims. 

11. The method of interrogation, Art of Questioning, {a) Intro- 
duction, (b) Objects of questioning: 1. Testing retention. 2. Train- 
ing of apperception, (r) Qualifications of the questioner, (d) Matter 
and form of questions, (e) Matter and form of answers. 

Text-book. Applied Psychology. McLellan and Dewey. 

ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY.— First Term. 
Introductory. 

1. Science and Method of Psychology. (a) Subject matter of 
Psychology. ( b ) Methods of Psychology: ( 1 ) Introspective; (2) Ex- 
perimental; ( 3 ) Comparative; ( 4 ) Objective. 

2. Mind and Modes of Activity. ( a ) Aspects of Consciousness. ( b ) 
Relations to each other, (c) Relations to the whole self. 

3. Knowledge. 

1. Elements of knowledge: ( a ) Sensation in General. 1. Physical 
Stimulus; 2. Psychical Factor; 3. Relations of Psychical and Physical; 
4. Functions of Sensation in Psychical Life, (b) Special Senses— Re- 
lationa t<» Touch. 1. Touch: I. Weber's Law and Psycho-physical 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 39 

Methods. II. Muscular Sensation. 2. Smell. 3. Taste. 4. Hearing-. 
5. Sight. 6. Temperature. 7. General Sensation. 

2. Process of Knowledge: ( a ) Nature of Problem: 1. Sensations 
and Known Objects. 2. The Knowing Self . {b) Apperception: 1. Prob- 
lem of Apperception. 2. Kinds of Apperception. ( e) Association. 1. 
Conditions 2. Forms. I. Simultaneous or Fusion. II. Successive: 
By Contiguity; by Similarity. III. Functions of Association. {d) Dis- 
sociation. 1. Relation to Association. 2. Conditions. 3. Functions in 
Psychical Life. {e) Attention. 1. Attention as Selecting Activity. 
2. Attention as Adjusting Activity. 3. Attention as Relating Activ- 
ity- (/) Retention. 

3. Stages of Knowledge: (a) Perception. 1. Of Objects. 2. Of 
Space. 3. Of Externality in General, (b) Memory. 1. Definition and 
Problem. 2. The Memory Image. 3. Memory of Time. 4. Self as Past 
and Present, (c) Imagination. 1. Definition. 2. Ideals in Imagina- 
tion. 3. Practical and Theoretical, (d) Thinking. 1. Definition and 
division. 2. Conception; growth of knowladge. 3. Judgment; Belief. 
4. Reasoning. I. A priori and posteriori. II. Inductive and Deduc- 
tive. 5. Systematization. (e) Intuition. 1. Intuition of the World. 
2. Intuition of Self. 3. Intuition of God. 

Feeling. — Second Term. 
1. Introduction. 2. Sensuous Feeling. 3. Formal Feelings. ( a) Of 
present adjustment, {b) Due to past experience, (c) Directed toward 
the Future. 4. Development of Qualitative Feeling, {n) In Universal- 
ity. ( b) In Definiteness. (c) Abnormal. ( d) Conflict of. 5. Intellectual 
Feeling, {a) General Nature, (b) Spring to intellectual action, (c) 
Objective side. 6. Esthetic Feeling. I. General Nature. (a) Con- 
nection with Idealization, (b) Universality of Beauty, {c) Factors of 
Esthetic Feeling — Harmony. II. As a Spring to Action, {a) The 
fine arts. III. The ^Esthetic Judgment — Taste. 7. Personal Feeling. 
I. General Nature, {a) Social, {b) Moral, (c) Religious. II. Asa 
Spring to Action, (a) Social Institutions. III. The Personal Judg- 
ment — Conscience. 

The Will. 

1. Sensuous impulses, (a) Reflex action, {b) impulses of percep- 
tion. ('•) instinctive impulses, {d) Impulses of expression. 

2. Development of volition, (a) Desire, (b) Choice — Motive, (c) 
Realization of motive. 

3. Physical control, (a) Localization of motor impulses, (b) Com- 
bination of motor impulses. 

4. Prudential control, {a) Development of desire, {b) Choice of 
ends and means, (c) Forms of prudential control. 1. Practical. 2. 
Intellectual. 3. Emotional. 



4C ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

5. Moral control, {a) Development of ethical desire. ( b ) Ethical 
choice, (c) Results of moral action. 1. Generic volition. 2. Regula- 
tion of desires. 3. Accurate and intuitive choice. 4. Effective execu- 
tion. 

Text: Dewey's Psychology. 

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION.— Third Term. 

Part I Education in its g-eneral idea: {a) Its Nature. 1. Possible 
only to self -active beings. 2. Education by Divine Providence. In- 
experience, or teachers. Relates to body, intellect, and will; must be 
systematic; conducted by schools. {!>) Its form. 1. Self-estrangement. 
teork, play. 2. Habit. 3. Authority, obedience, punishment, (c) Its 
Limits. 1. Subjective limits in the pupil's capacit}'. 2. Objective 
limit in the pupil's wealth and leisure. 3. Absolute limit in the pupil's 
completion of school work. 

Part II. Education in its special elements, [a) Physical. 1. Die- 
tetics. 2. Gymnastics. 3. Sexual ( omitted ). (b) Intellectual. 1. Psy- 
chological epochs. (") Intuitive-sense-perception. (6) Imaginative — 
fancy and memory, (c) Logical. II. Logical order. ( a ) of development 
of the pupil, (b) of development of the subject, (c) of demonstration. 

1. Analytic. 2. S3 r nthetic. 3. Dialectical. III. Instruction, {a) Pupil's 
capacity, {b) Pupil's act of learning. 1. Mechanical. 2. Dynamical. 
3. Assimilative, (c) Method of instruction. 1. Living example. 2. 
Text-book. 3. Oral, [d) Will training. 1. Social usages. 2. Moral 
training. (.«) The virtues. (b) Discipline, (c) Character. 3. Reli- 
gious education (omitted). 

Part III. Education in its particular systems, (a) National. 1. 
Passive, (a) Family — China. ( b) Caste — India. ( c ) Monkish — Thibet. 

2. Active. ( a ) Military — Persia. ( b ) Priestly — Egypt. ( r ) Industrial- 
Phoenicia. 3. Individual, (a) Aesthetic Greece, (b) Practical- Rome. 
(c) Abstract Individual German tribes, (d) Theocratic- The Jews. 
(e) Humanitarian, or Christian. I. Monkish. II. Chivalric. III. 
Citizen. 1. For special callings, (a) Secular. (6) Jesuits. ( e ) Pietistic. 

2. To achieve an ideal of culture, (a) Humanist. {/>) Philanthropist. 

3. For free citzenship. Text-book, Rosenkranz. 

PEDAGOGY. First, Second, Third Tarn. Three Hours a Week. 

Examination of the Course of Study below the High School. The 
psychology of the subjects is worked out and methods growing out of 
such examination arc discussed and illustrated by class exercises with 
children. An effort is made to apply the truths of psychology to the 
work of the recitation and to the general conduct of the educational 
process. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 41 

PRACTICE WORK IN THE PRACTICE SCHOOL. 
& 
"The Practice School, comprising - classes in the eig-ht grades of the 

•common school and the first two years of the High School, is designed 
to give careful and liberal training in the art of teaching in these 
grades. Each student in the Normal Department, before graduation, 
is required to teach four terms in the Practice School. A term's 
work consists in the daily instruction of a class for forty-five minutes 
during one full term. In some cases the daily observation and criti- 
cism of a class, followed by written and oral discussion, are taken in 
lieu of one term of teaching-. In g-eneral students are required to 
teach at least one term in each of the three departments, Primary, 
Intermediate, and Grammar School. 

The work of teaching is carefully supervised by the critic teachers. 
Each teacher of a class is required to write out the plans of recitations 
one week in advance. These plans are closely examined by the critic 
teacher and, where necessary, discussed with the class teacher and re- 
vised. The instruction itself is also observed by the critic teacher, and 
helpful criticisms are given in private. Each practicing teacher is 
held full}- responsible for the control and management as well as for 
the instruction of the class. He is expected to develop skill and 
power in the manag-ement and instruction of the class as a whole, and, 
at the same time, to study and adapt the work to the individual 
ability and disposition of each pupil. 

Students who have had no experience in teaching- find it best gen- 
erally to observe a class one full term in the Practice School before 
undertaking the instruction of a class. Careful criticism and discus- 
sion of the lessons observed are required of each observer. 

Each week, three illustrated or "critique" lessons are given by 
experienced teachers, one in each of the three departments, Primary, 
Intermediate, and Grammar School. All teachers and observers of 
one department are required to observe and criticise the lesson in that 
department, and an hour is devoted on Monday afternoon each week 
to its careful discussion under the direction of the critic teacher. This 
g-ives each teacher an opportunity each term to see a dozen such 
lessons carefully presented and thoroug-hly discussed in that depart- 
ment in which he is teaching-. 

Certain students are also appointed regularly to look after the chil- 
dren at noons, recesses, and during study periods, and, in peculiar 
cases, for the individual instruction of children. Individual studies of 
the children are regularly made in this way. 

The critic teachers often present illustrative lessons, at such times 
as are convenient, for the benefit of those students who are preparing 
for work in the Practice School. 



42 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

Teachers desiring- to fit themselves for primary teachers are per- 
mitted to put in most of the time teaching- work in the Primary De- 
partment. Those teachers who have had satisfactory training and 
experience and who wish to prepare themselves for expert work as 
critic teachers, will be allowed all the advantages afforded by the 
Practice School. 



Department of Ancient Languages. 



LATIN. 

1. Collar and Daniell's First Latin Book. 

Roman pronunciation with careful attention to long vowels. Con- 
stant drill in pronunciation, paradigm forms, translation, and compo- 
sition. Thoroughness in all this elementary work will be insisted 
upon. The ability slowly and painfully to recall forms is of no value. 
Twenty-one weeks. 

2. Eutropius or Viri Komae. Six weeks. 

The purpose of this course is to give practice in translating easy 
Latin. 

3. Beginning C.-ESar. First ten chapters of Book I and all of Collar's 

Latin Composition, based upon the same. The Lineal Relationship of 

Latin and English. 
A treatment of the two-thirds of English classically derived. The 
laws of the derivation and all the important types of the words com- 
ing from Latin (1) through Popular French, (2) through Learned 
French, (3) directly. Special pains will be taken to explain those 
whose derivation has been obscured by Popular French changes, as 
quaint from cognitum, gist from jac>t, j y from g<ivdi<t, queue from c<iudam, 
mtirvel from mirabilia, city from civi atem. A printed outline of this 
work will be furnished the student. Course (3) occupies twelve weeks. 

4. Second and Third Terms C/ESar. Twen'y-seven weeks. 

Drill upon the uses of the various cases, the subjunctives, the 
gerund and gerundives, the indirect discourse. Extended study of 
minor grammatical principles. The advance lesson each day is trans- 
lated as literally as is consistent with fair English; the review more 
freely. Parts of the text are translated slowly and critically; rapid 
translation of other portions; sight translations. Life of Caesar, 
Geography of Italy and G-atll. History of the age. Hooks /, //, / V, 

and tin- historically interesting portions <>f \ - VII. The historical worth of 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 43 

Caesar's Commentaries. Their literary value. Character of Caesar as 
shown in his own story. 

Collar's Composition based upon Book IT. 

Cognate Relationship of Latin and English. 

It is the aim to give in simple form instruction in such main re- 
sults of modern philological thought as are indispensable to those who 
wish to teach Latin and English as related languages. This will in- 
clude: 

A preliminary glance at Old English and its development into 
Modern English. 

The relation of the native one-third of English in a cognate way to 
Latin. The Latin correspondent of each English vowel and consonant 
will be shown. Quite a mass of material in the way of cognate words 
and suffixes will be used in illustration,- — thus, //'ate/' and brother, hostis 
and guest, lacrima and tear, ring and circus, fagus and book, anser and 
goose. A printed outline of this work will be furnished the student. 

5. Cicero. Four Catiline Orations, Archias, Ligarius, Manilian Law. 

Collar's Composition, Part IV. 
Critical translations of some portions; rapid translation of other 
parts. Syntax. Life of Cicero. Related history, geography, and biog- 
raphy. The Augustan Age. Thought analysis of orations. Written 
re-review of two in exceptionally smooth English. A persistent effort 
is made to secure from the pupil clear, forcible English that is at once 
worthy of the masterpiece he is translating and indicative of the 
constructions in the original. Continued attention to the lineal and 
to the cognate relationship of Latin and English. Sight reading-. 
Twenty-seven weeks. 

6. Ovid. Selections, mostly from the Metamorphoses, 1,500-2,000 lines. 

Life and works of Ovid. Elementary principles of versification. 
Scansion. Kelsey's Geeek and Roman Mythology. Twelve weeks. 

7. Virgil. JEneid, Books I- VI. 

Related biography, history, geography, and mythology. Careful 
study of versification. Facility in scansion required. Sight reading. 
The literary value of the ^Eneid. Twenty-one weeks. 

8 and 9, Horace. Selections from Odes. Livy. Selections from books 
XXI, XXII. 

These courses are offered that our graduates who teach Latin may 
have had a taste of work more advanced than is found in a high school 
course. Study of Horace's versification and new constructions. Study 
of comparative syntax based upon Livy and Caesar. Related history, 
biography, etc. Eighteen weeks. 
10. Tacitus {optional). Germania. or Agricola, or both. Twelve weeks--. 



A NNT A I„ C A T A I. ( ) GUE 



GREEK. 



1. Beginning Greek. FrosVs Greek Prime}- and Goodwin's Grammar to 

match. 
Constant drill in pronunciation, translation, and composition. 
Thoroughness in all this work will be insisted upon. The ability 
slowly and painfully to recall paradigm forms is of no value. Fifteen 
/recks. 

2. Zexophon. Anabasis I-IV: or Anabasis III, and selections fiom Ilellenica 

and Memorabilia. Sight translation. Greek prose composition. 
Critical translation of portions of the text; free translation of other 
parts. More extended study of minor grammatical principles. Related 
geography, history, and biography. Composition work based upon the 
text.* Elemental derivation work. Goodwin's chapter on word-for- 
mation. Thirty-nine /reeks. 

3. Hekodotus. Selections f mm Persian Ward. 

Study of Ionic forms and comparison with corresponding Attic 
forms. Classical geography studied in so far as useful for an intelli- 
gent exposition of the text. Sight translation. Related geography 
and history. T /reive week*. 

4. Homer. Iliad, Boiks I-IV ; or III, and an, equivalent for TII-IV from 

the Odyssey. 
Related history and geography. Greek mythology. Homeric forms 
compared with Attic and Ionic. Careful study of versification. Facilit}- 
iu scansion required. Rapid translation of portion of text. Critical 
exposition of other parts. Derivation work. Twelve weeks. 

5. Phiix>I,OGICAI, Work. 

During the Greek course the cognate relationship of Greek to En- 
glish and to Latin will be systematically studied, the rules for conson- 
ant and vowel correspondents learned and fully illustrated. 

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN, 
l. Joynes-Meissner's German Grammah and Boisen's German 
Prose. Fifteen i reeks. 
Three weeks are spent upon a brief synopsis of grammatical par- 
adigms and the translation of illustrative sentences. Then from 80- 
10!) pages of prose arc- read and the grammatical work based upon the 
text. Inductive study of tin- cognate relationship of English and Ger- 
man. The pupils discover for. themselves, by means of a classification 
of the German words thai they have had, the vowel and the consonant 
correspondence existing between German and English. 



ILLINOIS STATH NORMAL I'NTYKKSITY. 45 

2 . Minna von B a r n h k i<m . Eight weeks. 

3. JtJNGFRAU VON ()ki ( ka\s. Ten weeks. 

4. Hermann un'd Dokothka. Six week?. 

During- the reading- of (2), (3) and (4) the student is led to acquire 
a vocabulary. Attention is paid to helpful English cognates of new 
German words. Especial study of the conversational idioms that occur 
in the texts read. Some drill in composition. Considerable use of Ger- 
man as the language of the class room. English-German philology. 

The above comprises the first year's work in German. The second 
year's work varies somewhat, from year to year, as to the texts read. 
The following would be a representative program: Schiller's Wilhelm 
Tell, Buchleim's Deutch Lyrik ( The selections from Heine, Schiller, 
Guethe, and some others), Goethe's Egmont, Heine's Hartzreise, Frey- 
tag's Soil, und Haben; some easy sight reading. Philological, conver- 
sational and composition drill. 

POEITICAE ECONOMY. (Twelve weeks. ) 

1. Production. — Eand and Natural Agents, Labor, Origin: and Office 
of Capital, Productive Capability of a Community. 

2. Exchange. — Theory of Value, Theory of International Exchanges, 
Money and its value, Debased Coin: Seigniorage, Inconvertible Paper 
Money, Bank Money; Reaction of Exchange upon Production. 

3. Distribution. — Parties to the Distribution of Wealth; Rent, In- 
terest, Profits, Wages, Minor Shares, Reaction of Distribution upon 
Production. 

4. Consumption. — Subsistence, Population, Appearance of New Eco- 
nomic Wants, Consumption, the Dynamics of Wealth, Reaction of Con- 
sumption upon Production. 

5. Application of Economic Principles. — Usury Laws, Banking Func- 
tions, Co-operations, Trades Unions and Strikes, Unearned Increment 
of Land, Political Money, Bi-Metallism, Pauperism, Revenue of the 
State, Principles of Taxation, Protection and Free Trade. 



Courses of Study for the Practice School, 



In the following outlines for the work of the Practice School tl e 
work in Music and Gymnastics does not appear. Systematic exer- 
cises in both Singing and Physical Culture are introduced in all 

grades. 



46 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



Primary Department, 



FIRST GRADE. 
LITERATURE. 

FrKST Term -Fall. 

Stories 1-6 in "Classic Stories for the Little Ones." Thanksgiving 
and Christmas stories. 

Second Term — Winter. 

Stories 7-11, in "Classic Stories for Little Ones." Stories of Lin- 
coln, Washington, Longfellow, and Lowell. 

Third Term — Spring. 

Stories 12-15, in "Classic Stories for Little Ones." Stories of 
Froebel and stories in connection with Arbor Day, Fourth of July, 
and Memorial Day exercises. 

Children memorize many beautiful poems throughout the entire 
year. 

NATURE STUDY. 
First Term— Fall. 

1. Life History of Dog, Cow, Sheep, Squirrel, Rabbit, Mouse, Rat. 

2. Preparation of familiar trees with large buds, as walnut, hick- 
ory, buckeye, and poplars for winter rest, associated with gathering 
of autumn leaves. 

Secon i) Term — Winter . 

1. Winter study of Austrian Pine as type of Evergreen Trees. 2. 
Scotch Pine, Hemlock, any Norway Spruce by comparison with Aus- 
trian Pine. 3. Horse, Cat, and Chicken (type of birds). 

Trird Term Si-king. 

1. Plant seeds of Lima Beans, Sweet Pea, and Nasturtium. Watch 
development throughout term. 

2. Buds of Apple, Cherry, and Plum. This .study is begun before 
the buds are swollen at all. The study of the cherry is continued until 

cherries are ripe, and the other fruits are watched throughout the term. 
v Duck (type of water bird ). Goose by comparison with the duck. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 47 

READING. 

The children are introduced to Reading- through games for which 
directions are given at the board in writing. The vocabulary which 
the child has used in his plays and games becomes his first reading 
vocabulary. Later the following books are used: 

Cyr's Primer. 

Stickney's Primer. 

Cyr's First Reader. 

Thompson's Fairy Tale and Fable. 

Hodskin's Little People's Reader. 

Baldwin's First Reader. 

The Finch Primer. 

Phonics. — Sounds of the vowels and consonants in most common 
use in the readers. Letters not marked. Children are taught to re- 
cognize new words as fast as possible by makiug use of their knowl- 
edge of the sound values of letters. 

NUMBER. 

There are no regular classes in number work. Incidentally to the 
other subjects, especially nature study, the children learn to count and 
to perform simple operations, basing their work upon the need of quan- 
titatively measuring their experiences. 

WRITING— WRITTEN LANGUAGE— SPELLING. 

The writing begins with blackboard exercises. The children 
draw, with large, free movements, many objects (such as the cart- 
wheel, bushel basket, etc., ) in which they are interested and which 
supply plenty of opportunity for movement. This work in movement 
is then carried over into the large, free writing of the names of 
objects drawn. Later they write short sentences about the animals 
and plants studied. Needed capitalization and punctuation taught. 
First desk work as large as the desk will permit. 

DRAWING. 

Molding of simple objects studied in science, as eggs, nuts, fruits, 
animals, etc. Drawing of colored objects with cra3 r ons, such as buds, 
leaves, etc. Painting of same in water colors. Paper cutting and 
pasting. Blackboard and pencil illustrations of stories in literature. 
Drawi lgs of human form, a child posing as model. 

The teacher's method leaves the child wholly free in his execu- 
tion, merely directing his observation or arousing his imagination 
preliminary to the effort at expression. 



48 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

SECOND GRADE. 
LITERATURE. 

First Tkkm-Fau. 

Robinson Crusoe, chapters 1-10; or Hiawatha, sections III, VI, VII. 
VIII. 

Second Term- Winter. 

Robinson Crusoe, chapters 11-20; or Hiawatha, sections X, XI, 
XIV. XVIII, XX. 

Third Tkrm — Spring. 

Robinson Crusoe, chapters 21-29; or Hiawatha, sections V. XIII, 
XXI, XXII. 

The chapters referred to above are to found in "Robinson 
Crusoe for Boys and Girls." 

NATURE STUDY. 

First Term Fall. 

Continue and complete study of Apple and Plum begun in spring - . 
The Grape, ripened fruit on vine. 
Watermelon and Muskmelon from flower to fruit. 
Cabbage butterfly. 

Caterpillars frequenting any of the trees previously studied or 
the grape, and their preparations for winter: 
Preparation of plants for winter. 

Second Tkrm Winter. 

Snow Crystals. 

Salt, Sulphur, and Quartz Crystals by comparison with Snow Crys- 
Baldw in's Second Reade. 
tals. Kinds and formation of pebbles and stones. 



Crow and owl. 

Goat (by comparison with sheep, if the latter has already been 
studied ). 

Arrival of early spring birds time noted. 

Watch for any change in the buds of linden, larch, birch, and 
willow tree-,. 



A.NNUAI, CATALOGUE 



Third Term- Spring. 



Continuation of study of trees as in preceding 1 term. 
Brown thrush and golden-winged woodpecker. 

Seeds of melon, corn, and morning-glory sown. Watch develop- 
ment. 

Grape — buds and blossoms and green fruit. 

Violet. Lily. 

Honey bee. Firefly. Fish. 

READING FOR THE YEAR. 

••Classic Stories for the Little Ones." 

"Nature Stories for Young Readers,*' Vols. I and II. 

Poems connected with Literature and Nature Study. 

Grimm's Fairy Tales, Vol. I, Wiltse, 

"Pets and Companions," Stickne}-. 

•'Seed Babies," Morley. 

Second Reader, Cyr. 

Second Reader, Baldwin. 

Continuation of work in phonics as outlined for first year. 

NUMBER FOR THE YEAR. 

The work in number for the year is based upon actual measure- 
ments. The children are led to ideas of numbers and their relations 
by the measurement of things within their experience. Through this 
work of measurement the following number facts and processes are 
developed and fastened by drill: 

( <i ) The forty-five facts in addition. 

i 1> i Addition of single columns of figures by grasping the tens, sum 
not to exceed 20; thus, add 7, 4, 3, 2; the children see a ten in the seven 
and the three, which put with the four and two makes sixteen. 

(<■) Addition of two-place numbers, sum of either column to ex- 
ceed nine. 

i d) Since 3-|-4=7, 13+4=17, and 23+4=27, etc. Similar addition.-, 
carried to 100. 

(e) Understanding of all two-place numbers as composed of tens 
and units. 

I f) Subtractions suggested by I") and [r). 

! /. i Figures, Roman numerals, and names of numbers to 100. 

{In All tables of compound numbers in common use. 

( / i Divisions, Multiplications, and Partitions, to 20. 

I z i Multiplication table of 2s, 5s, 10s, and lis. 

Hall's Arithmetic Reader is used in review. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 51 

WRITTEN LANGUAGE— WRITING-SPELLING. 

Stories based on Nature Study and Literature, the sentences 
being connected in thought. 

Poems copied. 

Short stories reproduced by children as tests. 

In addition to the points insisted upon in the first year, the chil- 
dren learn to paragraph. 

Blackboard and desk exercises for freedom of movement in 
writing. 

Both writing and spelling are taug-ht incidentally to the work in 
written language. 

DRAWING. 

The method of the first grade is continued with new and more 
difficult materials. The child is especially stimulated to reproduce 
animal and human forms in action. Stories are illustrated by paper 
cuttinars. 



Intermediate Department, 



THIRD GRADE. 
LITERATURE. 
First Term — Fall. 
Hawthorne's Wonder Book. 

Second Term — Winter. 
Hawthorne's Tanglewood Tales. 

Third Term -Spring. 

Lamb's Adventures of Ulysses. 

Church's Stor3 r of the Iliad. 

Oral presentation. Use of good pictures. Develop a healthful im- 
agination. Secure full and clear reproductions. Let the moral judge- 
ment of the children be developed by estimating the characters and 
their deeds. Develop outlines and let each child preserve them in his 
blank book. 



52 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

NATURE STUDY. 
First Term — Fall. 

The corn plant; life history, parts, uses. 

The grasshopper. 

Dissemination of seeds. Cocklebur, milkweed, thistle, golden-rod, 
sunflower, sycamore, etc. 

The bullfrog-. 

The crow. 

Migration of birds. Time. 

Heat. Production, effects upon vegetation. Frost. The ther- 
mometer. Boiler house, a study of our system of heating- and ventila- 
tion. 

Second Term — Winter. 

Gray hare. Home, habits, enemies, manner of living-. 
Crystals. Snow, sugar, salt, alum, saltpetre. 

The hard maple's preparation for spring. Sap in February. Vapor- 
ization, clouds, rain. 

The stars and larger constellations; the moon and its changes. 
Arrival of early'spring- birds. Bird calendar. 

Third Te k m— Spring. 

Changes in the buds of the soft maple, box elder, birch, and wil- 
lows. Blossoms, seeds, leaves, seedling-s. 

Continue study of birds as above. Include nesting, rearing- of 
young-, food, songs, etc. 

The robin. The woodpecker. 

The honey bee. 

The potato. 

Excursions are to be taken with the children throughout the year 
as often as necessar}- and as the weather permits, in order that the 
work may be based on the pupils' personal experiences. 

READINO FOR THE YEAR. 

Scudder's Fables and Folk Lore. 

Mrs. McMurry's Robinson Crusoe. 

Stickney's ^sop's Fables. 

Stickney's Hans Anderson's Fairy Talcs. First Series. 



II.UXOIS STATE XOKMAI, UNIVERSITY. 53 

HOME GEOGRAPHY. 

First Term- Faij,. 

Visit to cupola of Normal School. Home neighborhood, prairies, 
forests, city, village, roads, bridg-es, slopes, brook. 

Farmer's fall work. Preparations for winter. 

An October garden. 

The campus. Slopes and drainage. Sand modeling. Map drawn 
to a scale. Miller Park relief. Forest Trees. 

Second Term— Winter. 

Farmer's winter work. Feeding stock. Stockj-ards. Shipping. 
The nursery. Grafting. 

The carpenter shop. The wagon shop. Blacksmith shop. 
School-room drawn to a scale. 

Third Term — Spring. 

The nursery. Kind of trees, packing, shipping. 

The garden in April, May, and June. Relation to hot-bed. 

The green-house. 

Farmer's spring work. 

Court house, records, court rooms, trials, etc. 

Local history and management of the town. Council, streets, 
police, etc. 

Parks and monuments, with their history. 

In the study of each of the phases of industrial home geography, 
(blacksmith, wagonmaker, nurseryman, farmer) especial attention is 
given to bringing out their relations to one another, looking ultimately 
towards notions of the division of labor, inter-dependence of trades 
and industries. Notions of physical geography are drawn from ex- 
cursions in the neighborhood. During the year the stories of the 
"Seven Little Sisters" are presented orally wherever they are best 
suited to the work in home geography, and as the first introduction to 
other countries. 

NUMBER FOR THE YEAR. 

Mastery of the tables in addition and subraction. 

Understanding of all three-place numbers as composed of hun- 
dreds, tens, and ones. 

Addition of columns of three-place numbers. Thorough under- 
standing of reduction. 

Mastery of subtraction. 



54 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

Drill on such examples as. What number added to 4 makes 10? 
Added to 5, 7, 6, 8, etc.? Sums and differences up to 20, as 9-f-9, 8-)-7, 
7+6; drill on endings, as 48+3, 68+3, 98+3. 

Reading- and writing- numbers to millions. Test understanding- of 
composition by frequently asking- "what" and "how; many." 

Tables of linear, liquid, dry measure; of time; weight, and money. 

Cook & Cropsey's "Elementary Arithmetic," pp. 7-130. Make the 
arithmetic class a reading class at times when necessary. 

Concrete examples from excursions in geography and science: 
draw on child's environment for materials. 

Exact mathematical language in analysis; accurate, neat form in 
board work. 

LANGUAGE— SPELLING— WRITING. 

Language, spelling, and writing are taught in connection with the 
other studies, especially geography, literature, and science. These 
furnish abundant, familiar, and interesting subject matter, and the 
motive for either oral or written expression. The aim is fluency, free- 
dom, variety. Corrections spring wholly from the child's needs. 
Thirty or forty short compositions from each child during the year, 
written, corrected, and copied under the supervision of the teacher. 

Special drill hours for writing are devoted to securing- g-ood move- 
ment and form. In other subjects requiring- writing- the child is ex- 
pected to preserve, first of all, good position and movement. Form to 
be left to time. 

DRAWING FOR THE YEAR. 

Perspective of large, coarse, curved-edged objects. Work for free- 
dom, and proportion. 

Studies from nature in both fall and spring. 

Studies from the subject matter of literature, geography, and 
science. Holiday illustrations. 

Clay work in the fall and spring-. Blackboard work. 

The following list suggests the character of the studies. 

Tub, drum, peck measure, bushel basket, kettle, keg, crock, bucket, 
coffee-pot, Hag-, gun, hatchet, sword, cap, Christmas stocking, tree, 
common tools, sled, basket, gray hare, thermometer, oil can, water 
sprinkler, mittens, kite, small alarm clock, broom, brush, view of 
human form, branching of trees, leaves, (lowers. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 55 

FOURTH GRADE. 

HISTORY. 

First Term — Fall. 

MeMurry's Pioneer History Stories. Oral presentation of the 
stories of Joliet and Marquette. Hennepin, LaSalle, The Sioux Mas- 
sacre. George Rogers Clarke. 

Second Term — Winter. 

From the same source the stories of Boone. Robertson and Sevier, 
Lincoln, of Cincinnati and Marietta. 

Third Term— Spring. 

From the same source the stories of Lewis and Clark, Fremont, 
De Soto. For the method see under Literature for Third Grade. See 
pages 46-47. 

NATURE STUDY. 

First Term— Fall. 

Cabbage butterfly. Caterpillars. 

Turtle. 

Grape — the ripened fruit. 

Wild grasses. 

Preparation of animals and plants for winter. 

Migration of birds. Time. 

Second Term— Winter. 

"Winter study of evergreens on campus. 

The sun — sunlight, sunglass, prism, colors, position of sun. 

Sources of springs, rivers, wells. Porosity. 

The pump. Construction. 

Third Term --Spring. 

Review third grade work on maple, boxelder, birch. 
Fertilization and the part insects play in the fertilization of plants. 
Grape — buds and blossoms. 

Germination. Bean, corn, buckeye, walnut, maple. Seeds 
watched. 

Crayfish. 

Apple and plum blossoms. Formation of fruit. 
* Robin, woodpecker, turtle dove. 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



READING FOR THE YEAR. 



Hawthorne's Wonder Book and Tanglewood Tales. 

Eliot's six stories from the Arabian Nights. 

Francillon's Gods and Heroes. 

Bryant's Translation of Ulysses among the Phaeacian.N, 

Kingsley's Water Babies. 

Use of dictionary acquired. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

Fikst Tkkm — Fall. 

The Illinois river: the prairies of Illinois; corn und live stock in 
Illinois: the coal mines of Illinos: a trip on the Upper Mississippi: 
pineries and lumbering- in Minnesota; Minneapolis as a trade center: 
the great wheat region of the Northwest: several great trade routes 
to Chicago. 

Second Term- -Winter. 

Lake Superior. St. Mary's Canal and Falls. 

The iron mines of Michigan. ( Blast furnace ). 

Chicago as a trade center. 

Tobacco raising in Kentucky. Tobacco region. 

The surface of Tennessee. 

The lower Mississippi. Jetties. 

Third Tkkm Spring. 

Cotton raising in Mississippi (cotton belt). 
Springfield and State government. 
Sugar in Louisiana. 

Cattle ranch in Texas (great grazing region). 
Pike's Peak and vicinity. 
Irrigation and the Big" Ditch at Denver. 
Yellowstone Park. 

Oral presentation as described under Literature for third grade. 
Sec page 51. Free use of sand and chalk. 

ARITHMETIC FOR THE YEAR. 

Mastery ol multiplication tables. 

Principles underlying multiplication. Relation to addition. 
Multiplication <•!' six-place numbers by 1. 2. 3, and 4-place num- 
bers. 

Shorl division. Six-place dividend. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 57 

Mastery of long" division. 

Review old tables of denominate numbers. Add square and cubic 
measure. 

Cook & Cropsey's Elementary Arithmetic, p. 131-224. 

LANGUAGE— SPELLING— WRITING. 

Expansion of work for third grade. See third grade, page 54. 

DRAWING FOR THE YEAR. 

Perspective of simple straight-edged objects. 

Studies from nature. 

Studies suggested by history, geography, science. Holidaj' illus- 
trations. Clay work. Blackboard handling. 

The following list is sug-g-estive: Boxes, baskets, pans, telescope, 
satchel, sled, bench, table, coffee-mill, trunk, book shelves, wheelbar- 
row, tent, vegetables, sprays of leaves, entire plants ( root, stem, leaves, 
etc.. ) flowers. 

FIFTH GRADE. 
HISTORY. 
First Term — Fade. 
Champlain, Hudson, John Smith, Sir Walter Raleigh. 

Second Term — Winter. 
Columbus, Magellan, Cortez. 

Third Term — Spring. 

The Pilgrims; Washington to Braddock's Defeat; Fremont, trip 
across plains and mountains to California in 1849. 

NATURE STUDY. 

First Term — Faee. 
Clam. Catfiish. 
Apple. Plum. 
Migration of birds. Time. 
Steam engine 

Second Term — Winter. 
Light and the eye. Eye of an ox. Human eye. 
The moon and its phases. Tides. 

The crust of the earth; geologic strata; pebbles; limestone; granite: 
marble; gravel bank; gorge; erosion; glaciers; volcanoes; fossils. 



58 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

Third Term Spring. 

Milkweed butterfly. 
Honey bee. 

Review of work of fourth grade in germination and building of 
trees. See page 55. 

Hepatica and marsh-marigold. 

Blackbird. Bobwhite. 

Movements of the earth about the sun. 

READING FOR THE YEAR. 

Hiawatha, Parts I and II. Memorize selections. 
Rusxin's King of the Golden River. 
Macaulay's Eays of Ancient Rome. 
Whittier's Barefoot Boy. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

First Tkkm - Fau,. 

Hudson River; Mt. Washington (White- mountains); Boston ( his- 
tory and commerce); a cotton mill at Lowell ( Merrimac river ) ; Ship 
building at Philadelphia ( ship and navy yards ). 

Secon i ) Tkkm — Winte R . 

Washington (national government); oyster fisheries of Chesa- 
peake bay (comp. Long Island Sound); James river and surface fea- 
tures of Virginia; the pineries of Carolina; the orange groves of 
Florida (comp. California). 

Thikd Term- Spring. 

The Alleghany mountains as a whole; New York city as a trade 
center; a gold mine in California; the salmon fisheries of the Colum- 
bia: the St. Lawrence river; City of Mexico (plateau and climate); 
the Rocky mountains as a whole; the river systems and slopes of 
North America. 

ARITHMETIC FOR THE YEAR. 

Factoring; least common multiple; cancellation: common and 
decimal fractions. 

Cook and Cropsey, pp. 224-2(>7. 

LANGUAGE SPELLING WRITING. 

( ontinuation of work of Third and Fourth Grades. See Third 
Grade. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 59 

DRAWING FOR THE YEAR. 

Perspective of both curved and straight edged objects. (See 
Third and Fourth Grades). Development of exact work. Artistic 
handling*. Much outdoor sketching. Development of first expression 
in liirht and shade. 



Grammar and Preparatory Department, 



The Grammar School is intended for those who wish to prepare for 
the Normal School, for a Hig-h School, or for general business. 

Young men and young women not fully prepared for the Normal 
Department are enabled to enter after spending a term or two in the 
rigorous preparatory drill of the Grammar School; while to those who 
are preparing for a High School, it offers excellent academic training-. 
It is under the direct charge of a Principal, and his assistant teachers 
are under the constant supervision of the Principal Training Teacher. 

Pupils often fail in their effort to get a higher education, simply 
because their elementary education has been poor; hence great care is 
taken that each shall be well-grounded in elementary knowledge. 

Those who wish merely a common-school education will find the 
course comprehensive enough for all ordinary business purposes. 
Much care is taken that pupils shall become good penmen, and that 
the}- shall acquire a ready knowledge of arithmetic, in order that they 
may make good accountants. Those more advanced will have the op- 
portunity of studying bookkeeping, taught according to the most prac- 
tical methods. 

The grading is such that pupils may take the work which they are 
best fitted to do; and, those who may wisely do so are allowed to take 
any of the languages in the Normal School. 

The moral influence of the school and its surroundings is good. 
Vicious boys who are outcasts from other schools will not find admit- 
tance here. Saloons and other places of evil resort are not allowed in 
the town. Tuition is charg-ed at the rate of $25 a year. 

SIXTH GRADE. 
HISTORY. 

First Term — Fall. 

Colonial History — Massachusetts and Virginia. Biographies of 
Miles Standish, Raleigh, and John Smith. 



60 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

Second Term— Wi n t e r . 

Colonial History — New York and the Iroquois; Pennsylvania and 
Maryland; Biographies of Stuyvesant, Franklin, and William Penn. 

Th i k i) Term— Spring. 

Colonial History — Georg-ia ( Og-lethorpe ). Review of three type 
colonies. French and Indian Wars. Washington and Braddock. 

NATURAL SCIENCE. 

First Term— Fau,. 

Study of seeds and fruits and the preparation of plants and ani- 
mals for winter. 

Second Term- Winter. 

Experiments in condensation and evaporation. 
Application to physical geography. 
Erosion in varions forms. 
World water partings. 
World river basins. 
World river systems. 

Third Term— Spring. 

Animal life of brooks, tish. frog, reptiles; germination spring 
flora. 

READING. 
First Term Fait.. 
Courtship of Miles Standish. Autobiography of Franklin. 

Second Term Winter. 

Legend of Sleepy Hollow. 
Snow Bound. 

Third Term Spring. 

EJva ngeli tie. 

Burrough's Birds and Bees. 

Vocal and phonic drill throughout the year to meet the needs of 
the class. 



IUJNOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 61 

GEOGRAPHY, 

Europe. Type studies. Numerous comparisons with similar 
places studied in North America. Close the work with study of 
physical features of continent. Sand-modeling-, chalk-modeling - , and 
sketching. 

ARITHMETIC. 

First Term — Faee. 

Review decimal and common fractions. 
Cook and Cropsey's Advanced Arithmetic. 

Second Term — Winter. 

Review common fractions and compound numbers. Miscellaneous 
problems in text. 

Third Term — Spring. 
Metric system. Percentage. Applications. 

LANGUAGE— SPELLING -WRITING. 

Continuation of work outlined for third grade. See page 54. 

DRAWING FOR YEAR. 

Continuation of studies in form, light and shade and perspective 
as in 3d, 4th, and 5th grades. Outdoor and indoor sketching. Color 
work in spring. Selections as before. 

SEVENTH GRADE. 

An opportunity for a year of German will be given the children of 
this grade. 

HISTORY. 

First Term — Falx. 
Revolutionary War — Biographies. 

Second Term — Winter. 

From the Revolutionary War to the Close of the War of 1812. 
Framing of Constitution, Hamilton. Northwest Territory. Biogra- 
phies of Adams, Jefferson, and Madison. 



62 annual catalogue 

Third Term Spring. 

Tariff and State's rights. Slavery question. Mexican War. 
Territorial growth. War for the Union. Biographies of Lincoln, 
Lee, and Grant. 

NATURAL SCIENCE. 

First Term— Fall. 

Physiology— Circulation, respiration, digestion, effects of alcohol 
and narcotics. 

Second Term -Winter. 

Heat — Convection and radiation. 
Air pressure. 

Third Term— Spring. 

Study of Type Trees— Maple. 

Birds Woodpecker, bluejay, wild pigeon, blackbird. 

READING. 
First Term Fall. 

Study of national poems bearing on history work, as Paul Revere's 
Ride, Lexington. Ballad of the Boston Tea Party. 
Selections from Lamb's Tales of Shakespeare. 

Second Term Winter. 

Hale's-Man Without a Country. 

Hawthorne's Tales of the White Hills. 

Andrew's Ten Boy's on the Road from Long ago to Now. 

Third Term Spring. 

Scott's Lady of the Lake. 

Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal. 

Burrough's Birds and Bees. 

For phonic and vocal drill see sixth grade. 

( ; E< ) M FT R Y A N I ) A R [TH M ET I C . 
l'' \u. Term. 
Lines and angles, circles, arcs and angles, rectangles, and triangles. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAI, UNIVERSITY. 63 

Wintkk Term. 
Quadrilaterals, circles and lines. 

Spring Term. 

Polygons and simple applications in solid geometry. 

Proofs and generalizations based on the construction and super- 
position of fig-tires: at all times the work is intended to lap over and 
illuminate arithmetical processes. 

LANGUAGE FOR THE YEAR. 

Fall and winter terms devoted to technical grammar, presented 
orally. Frequent essays on topics of history, science, literature, and 
geography. Spring term devoted chiefly to language work in connec- 
tion with nature study. Spelling and writing- as before. 

DRAWING. 

Continuation of work of sixth grade, with more difficult studies. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

Type studies from Asia, Africa, South America, and the Islands 
of the Sea, treated as in sixth grade. 

EIGHTH GRADE. 

HISTORY. 

First Term — Fail. 

English History- The Teutons, Feudalism, Magna Charta, Re- 
naissance, Discovery of America. 

Second Term — Wintkk 

English History — Tudor period, period of discovery and explora- 
tion, colonization of America; growth of colonial possessions and 
American Revolution. 

Third Term- -Spring. 

Review American History in light of preceding- English History; 
Critical period, growth and development of Union, War for Union, 
reconstruction and later development. 



64 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

NATURAL SCIENCE. 
First Term— Faix. 

Air — Elasticity, expansion, air currents, air pressure, barometer. 
Manual work in application of scientific principles: construction of 
pump and barometer. Or 

Heat — Evaporation, condensation, construction of steam engine,. 
study of thermometers. 

Second Term — Winter. 

Magnetism and Electricity. Construction of electric bell system: 
telephone and telegraph. 

Third Term — Spring. 

Type trees — Austrian Pine. 

Spring flowers — Fertilization and germination. 

READING FOR THE YEAR. 

Scott's Ivanhoe. Rasselas. Merchant of Venice, Rolfe's Tales from 
English History in Prose and Verse, Emerson's Fortune of the Re- 
public, Burke's American Orations. Lincoln's Gettysburg Speech. 
Short poetical selections, as the Launching of the Ship, bearing on 
history. 

For phonic and vocal drill see sixth grade. 

MATHEMATICS. 

First Term Fau,. 

Algebra Giffin's Grammar School Algebra, to page 52. 
Exercise in algebraic language. Addition, subtraction, multipli- 
cation and division. Simple equations. 

Second Term Winter. 
Finish Giffin's Grammar School Algebra. 

Third Term Spring. 

Arithmetic Review percentage and applications; involution, 
evolution, and mensuration. Finish Cook & Cropsey's New Advanced 
Aril hmetic. 

LATIN, GERMAN, OR GRAMMAR FOR THE YEAR. 

In this year Latin is accepted as an alternative i'<>r grammar 
from those who desire t<> begin Latin a1 this time in order to be better 
prepared for High School or Normal work. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY 



65 



Latin — Fall term to p. 67, winter term to p. 125, spring term to the 
end of Collar & Daniell's First Latin Book. 

Grammar for Fall and Winter terms: Continuation of seventh 
grade work. Complete South worth and Goddard. Spring- term de- 
voted to essay work. 

DRAWING FOR YEAR. 

Continuation of work for seventh grade. Pen and ink work. 



High School Course, 

To provide for pupils completing our grammar school studies, a 
four-3 r ear course has been arranged. This course embraces the lan- 
guages, mathematics, and sciences; furnishes a good general educa- 
tion and prepares the student for college. Students in this department 
are insured clear instruction and thorough discipline in the studies 
they pursue. During the first two years these students are under the 
immediate supervision of the Principal of the Grammar school. They 
pay tuition and receive a high school diploma on completing the 
course. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Fall Term. 

Latin: — Latin Grammar and 

Reader. 
Algebra: — Through factoring. 
Science: — Plants and seeds and 
their preparation for winter. 
Literature: — American Classics. 

WINTER TERM. 

Latin: — Latin Reader and Gram- 
mar. 

Algebra: — Greatest common div- 
isor, least common multiple, 
fractions, fractional equations. 

Science: — Elementary Astron- 
omy, Text -Ball's Starland. 

Literature: — Masterpieces of 
British Literature. 



SPRING TERM. 

Latin: — Eutropius and Caesar. 

Arithmetic: — Review. Time 
and topics determined by the 
need of the class. 

Science: — Elementary Geology. 
"The Earth and its Story" by 
Heilprin. Observation of speci- 
mens with trips to points of 
geological interest. 

Literature: — "Tales of the White 
Hills." 

SECOND* YEAR. 

FALL TERM. 

Latin: — Caesar and Prose Com- 
position. 



66 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



Civics: — Civil Government by 
Fiske, and Illinois and the 
Nation, by Trowbridge. 
Zoology. 

WINTER TERM. 

Latin: — Caesar and Prose Com- 
position. 
Ancient History: — Text. Myers. 
Rhetoric. 

SPRING TERM. 

Latin: — Cicero. 

Botany. 

Rhetoric and Literature. 

-THIRD YEAR. 

FALL TERM. 

Cicero, English Literature and 
Advanced Algebra. 



WINTER TERM. 

Ovid, Physiology, and Plane 
Geometry. 

SPRING TERM. 

Virgil, Physical Geography, and 

Solid Geometry. 

-FOURTH YEAR. 

KALI. TERM. 

Virgil and Horace, German, 
Physics. 

WINTER TERM. 

Livy, German, Physics, Reading 
and Themes. 

SPRING TERM. 

German, Chemistry, and Politi- 
cal Economy. 



Preparatory Department. 



The work of this department, which is connected with the Gram- 
mar department, is designed especially for those who need a special 
preparation before entering the Normal department. 

LITERATURE AND READING. 

Seven American Classics: Snow Bound, Evangeline, Vision of Sir 
Launfal. Special attention to thought and interpretation and to good 
habits of enunciation and expression in reading. Phonic and vocal 
work to meet the needs of the class. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

North America. Relief as basis of study: Slope the unit of re- 
lief: mountain ranges and plateaus compared as to altitude and area; 

cltcct of Millie o.i climate, vegetation and industries. Drainage of con- 
tinent. Comparison of river systems and basins. 



A description oi th< 
found under t he "Anah sis 



(in rses 
.1 Coun 



•ffered di 
• ol Stud] 



i jj the Third and Fourth years ma; 
i! lirst pari of this catalogue. 



ILLINOIS St ATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 67 

SCIENCE. 

Correlated with geography. Problems from heat, air, and water. 
In the spring, seeds and trees of the campus. 

ARITHMETIC. 

Common and decimal fractions, compound numbers, percentage. 
Careful work in analysis and oral and written expression. 

GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION. 

Themes from the work in Literature, Science, and Geography. 
Purpose, — facility in the use of clear, correct English, both oral and 
written. Attention to thought, organization, and paragraphing as 
preparation for composition. 

WRITING. 

Fifteen minutes of daily instruction in vertical script. 



68 



A N NI'AI. C A T A I,< >GU K 



The TwcYear Course, 



Graduates of approved high schools, or persons possessing equiv- 
alent qualifications, will be admitted to the following- course: 

FIRST YEAR. 



SECOND YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 
Advanced Psychology, 20 hours 

per month. 
Illustrative Teaching. 12 hours 

per month. 
English Literature, 21) hours per 

month. 
Civil Government, IS hours per 

month. 
Physics, 20 hours per month. 

SECOND TEKM. 
Advanced Psychology^ 20 hours 

per month. 
Illustrative Teaching. 12 hours 

per month. 
Practice Teaching, 20 hours per 

month. 
Shakespeare and Themes, 20 

hours per month. 
Geometry, IS hours per month. 

T R I K I ) T K K M . 

Philosophy of Education, 20 

hours per month. 
Illustrative Teaching, 12 hours 

per month. 
Practice Teaching, 20 hours per 

month. 
Physical Geography, 18 hours 

per month. 
Bookkeeping and School Law, 

20 hours per month. 

The 1 wo-year pupils recite with the three-year pupils. The explana- 
tion of 1 lie course of study, consequently, applies to' both courses. 

A course in penmanship and vocal music Ls given in addition tn 
t he ;i bOVC 



FIRST TERM. 

frpadirfff.* 18 hours per month. 
Arithmetic, 18 hours per month. 
Elementary Psychology, 18 hours 

per month. 
Zoology, 18 hours per month. 
Elements of Pedagogy, 8 hours 

per month. 
Drawing, 8 hours per month. 

SECOND TEKM. 

Pedagogy, 18 hours per month. 
English Grammar, 18 hours per 

month. 
^X^0 Geography; IS hours per month. 
Ancient History, 18 hours per 

month. 
Drawing-, 8 hours per month. 
Practice Teaching, 20 hours per 

month. 

THIRD TERM. 

Pedagogy, IS hours per month. 
English Literature, IS hours per 

month. 
Algebra, IS hours per month. 
Botany. 18 hours per month. 
Practice Teaching, 20 hours per 

month. 
Drawing, 8 hours per month. 
Vocal Music, 8 hours per month. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY, 



69 



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ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY 



The Christian Associations, 



There are two such societies, one for young- men, Y.M.C.A.; and 
one for young- women, Y.W.C.A. While they are separate organiza- 
tions, union meeting's are regularly held. As their name implies, they 
are Christian associations. All members of evangelical churches may 
become active members, while others may become associate members. 

The work of these associations is many-sided, including- religious 
devotion, instruction and study, missionary work, social culture, and 
the futherance of religious culture and work along all lines. On the 
one side the body of students has in these societies the best opportunity 
for religious growth, org-anization, and social contact, and on the 
other the Sunday schools and churches are reinforced by the work of 
the societies. 

The devotional meetings consist of prayer meetings, held each 
Tuesday evening by each of the associations, and a union meeting of 
the two each Sunday afternoon at four o'clock. The Tuesday evening 
meetings are conducted by the students, while the Sunday afternoon 
meetings are led sometimes by the pastors of the churches, sometimes 
by teachers or students of the Normal school. 

The Bible-study class meets each Friday evening. For some years 
it has been conducted by Dr. E. C. Hewett, ex-President of the Normal 
school. It consists of a careful and comparative study of the Bible 
testimony of important religious topics. 

The sociables given near the opening- of each term furnish oppor- 
tunity to the new students to become acquainted with each other and 
with older students, thus introducing them to the religious and social 
life of the school. 

The associations cultivate systematically the mission spirit, and 
carry on some of its work. The students raise annually three hundred 
dollars with which, in co-operation with five of the churches in the 
town, five native missionaries are supported in foreign fields. A stu- 
dents' volunteer band is made up of those who intend eventually to 
enter upon the work in foreig-n fields. A missionary study class meets 
each Friday afternoon, The library of the Normal School has also 
been supplied, through the efforts of the associations, with a collec- 
tion of forty-five volumes of missionary literature. 

Students are welcomed at all the meeting's of the associations, and 
to its opportunities for religious devotion and culture. 



ANNIAI, CATALOG IK 

The Oratorical Association. 



This association had its origin in the winter term of 1889, the prime 
mover being- Mr. Charles Beach, an enterprising student. Annual 
contests were held until the year 1895-6, when the association sent 
a representative to a meeting of delegates from the Normal schools of 
Kansas, Iowa, Illinois, and Missouri, who met for the purpose of or- 
ganizing an Inter-State League of Normal Schools. As a result of 
that meeting an association was formed and the first oratorical con- 
test was held at Warrensburg, Mo., May 8, 1896. 

Five states sent contestants, viz: Wisconsin, Kansas, Illinois, 
Iowa, Missouri. The honors were awarded in the order named. The 
contestant from Illinois was Robert J. Wells. Although Mr. Beach 
left the school several years ago, his interest in the association is 
evinced by the fact that he made provision for an annual prize of 
one hundred dollars and a gold medal for the winner of the prelimi- 
nary contest, the same to be known as the Beach prize. 

The second contest was held at Emporia, May 7, 1897, the same 
States sending contestants. Illinois was represented by Chester M. 
Echols. The rank of the contestants was as follows: Iowa, Missouri, 
Illinois, Wisconsin, Kansas. 

The third contest was held in Normal, May 6, 1897. Illinois was 
represented by H. E. Covey. The rank of the contestants was as 
follows: Kansas, Wisconsin. Missouri, Iowa, Illinois. 



Accredited High Schools. 



Graduates of accredited high schools may be admitted to the two- 
year course upon presentation of their diplomas. School authorities 
desiring" to have their school placed upon this list should correspond 
with the president. The course should be not less than four years in 
length. 



University of Illinois, 



The Normal School work is recognized ai the University of Illinois 
and ample credit allowed for it in the University course. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



1895. 




1 599. 


SEPTEMBER. 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


5 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F|S 


S M | TW| T 


P|S 


s |m 


T 


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1 


2 3 




l' 2 3' 4 5 


1 J 

o 7; 


.. .. 








•■I 1 


4 


5 


6 


i 


8 


9 10 




8 9 11011112 


1314' 


2: 3 


4 


5 


() 


7 8 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 17 




15 Hi 17 18 19 


20,21: 


9,10 


11 


12 


13 


1415 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 23 24 




22 23 24 25J26 


27|28 


16| 17 


18 19 


20 


21 ! 22 


25 


20 




28 29J30 .. 

..1 1. '.. 




29 30 31 . . . 
J. I..I..I.. 


:.\: 


23 24 
30l.. 


25 20 
. 1.. 


27 


28 29 


OCTOBER, 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 










l 
s 




1 


1 


1 


31 "4 




1 


2 
9 


■3 


1 


51 
12 13 


2 3 


4 


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is 


19 20 


16 17 


IS 


19 20 


21 


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19 


20 21 


22 23 


2425, 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


20 27 


23 24 
30 31 


25 


26 l 27 


28 


2" 




>t, 


27 28 


| 




28 29 


30 


^1 




1 


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"I.. 


J. 1 










1 


NOVEMBER. 


MARCH j 


JUNE 




..!.. 








6 

13 

20 

27 




8 


9 10 11 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


-J J 

9 10 


•J M 2 

7 S 9 
14 15 16 
21 22 23 
28 29 30 

..I.. 1 .. 


ID 

17 
24 


4 
11 

IS 

25 


5 
12 
1') 
2o 


5 


7 




12 
1') 


13'l4 
20 21 


15 
22 


10 17 18 
23 24 25 


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IS 


12 
19 


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2,i 21 22 


10 ! 17 
23 24 




20 


27 28 


29 


30 ! 31 K 


25 


26 


27,28 29 30] . . 






DECEMBER. 




• • 


.. ..1 ll 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 "89 


in 






11 


12 


13 14 15.10 


17 






IS 


19 


20 21 22 23 


24 






25 


26 


27 28'29|30 

.. ..I.J.. 


31 







Calendar for 1898x99, 



The school year of 39 weeks is divided into three terms. 

The first term of 15 weeks begins on Monday, September 12, 1898, 
and closes on Thursday, December 22. Examinations at the close of 
the term. Annual Contest of Literary Societies on Thursday evening", 
December 22. Semi-annual meeting- of the Board of Education on 
Wednesday, December 7. 

Vacation of one week. 

The second term begins on Monday, January 2, 1899, and closes on 
Thursday, March 23. Examinations at the end of the term. 

Vacation of one week. 

The third term beg-ins on Monday, April 3, and closes on Wednes- 
day, June 21. Examinations during the last week of the term. Annual 
meeting of the Alumni June 21. Annual meeting of the Board of Edu- 
cation on Wednesday, June 21. Commencement exercises on Thurs- 
day, June 22. 

Vacation of eleven weeks. 

The new school year opens on Monday, September 11 



1890. 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



Students. 



NAMES. 

Barrett, Mabel Winslow 
Bassett, Ellen Irene 
Cowles, Catherine 
Goodwin, Nellie 
Hig-bee, Iva A. 

Hildenbrandt, Jennie Caroline 
Hospes, Cecilia L,ezzette 
Morse, Helen S. 
Ruhl, Ada Myrtle 
Washburn, Emma 
Coley, Charles D. 
Foster, Georg-e Kenyon 
Johnson, Riley Oren 
Matheney, Francis Edmund 
Pike, Nelson Davidson 
Wortman, Thomas Brintou 



Post'Graduate and Special, 

COUNTY. 

McLean. 
LaSalle, 
McLean, 
Shelby, 
Mercer, 
*( Missouri, ) 
*( Missouri ) 
Gallatin. 
Be Witt, 
-McLean, 
Coles, 
-McLean, 
Cole*. 

( Kent nek;/, i 
Madison, 
Shelby, 



POST-OFFICE 

Normal 

Tonica 

Bloomington 

Moaweo.ua 

Sherrard 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

SJiawneetown 

Clinton 

Bloomington 

Oakland 

Normal 

Hindsboro 

Berea 

St. Jacobs 

Shelbyville 



Senior Class. 



Beggs, Dorothea Katherine 
Chicken, Sada Rosanna 
Cleveland, L/ida, T. 
Cooper, Annetta Belle 
Corson, Mabel Maude 
Cowles, Bessie Abiah 
Curtis, S. Macy 
Dillon, Jessie May 
Elliott, Georgia 
Fincham, Nellie 
l-'ra nk. Margaret Julia 
( rrassma tin, Adelaide 



( Colorado | 
Woodford, 

* McLean. 
McLean, 
McLean, 
Kankakee, 

'■■McLean, 
McLean, 
Macon, 
McLean, 

Whiteside, 

St. Clair. 



JJen ver 
Secor 

Normal 
Normal 
Normal 

Kankakee 
Normal 
Normal 
Decatur 

Towanda 

Sterling 

Belleville 



These names maked with a star arc names of persons who have given their pledge 
,\ intention to teach and who are pursuing the regular Normal Course, but, by reason 
.! residence in McLean county, or wishing to be free to teat h In oiher states, or because 

lot o! thej have not been admitted to the Normal School as State beiiefi- 

iaries. Thej i>a\ tuition as Model students, at the rate of $39 a year. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY 



NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


post-office; 


Hamblin, Mrs. Ellen T. 


Knox, 


Galesburg 


Humphrey, Annabel 


McLean , 


Towanda 


Kaiser, Wilhelmine 


Piatt, 


Atwood 


Kerns, Carrie 


Iroquois, 


Onarga 


Lange, Ottilie 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Lentz, Mary 


Stephenson 


Freeport 


Lesem, Josephine 


Adams, 


Quincy 


Lyons, Marien Ida 


Marion, 


Centralia 


Monroe, Grace Adela 


McLean, 


LeRoy 


Morse, Fannie Edna 


Lake, 


Gilmer 


Pitts, Henrietta Betsy 


-McLean, 


Bloomington 


Porter, Eva Amanda 


La Salle, 


Streator 


Rickards, Mary Amelia 


Marion, 


Centralia 


Rig-g-s, Mrs. Eilla Delle 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Ross, Silva 


Macon, 


Argenta 


Roziene, Addie Eliza 


Cook, 


Ii ring Park 


Smith, Nano Pearl 


Ogle, 


Crest on 


Snell, Clara May 


Carroll, 


Milledgeville 


Stetzler, Emma Grace 


Stark, 


Duncan 


Sullivan, Mary Ellen 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Travis, Carrie Estelle 


Shelby, 


Prairie Home 


Williams, Julia 


{Missouri) 


Hannibal 


Wilmer, Anna Elizabeth 


Shelby, 


Oconee 


Wrig-ht, Emilie 


Iroquois, 


Watseka 


Brig-ht, Bruce 


* McLean, 


Norma/ 


Bumgarner, Joseph 


Putnam, 


31 1. Palatine 


Coleman, Lyman H. 


DeKalb, 


Sandwich 


Covey, Hyatt Elmer 


* McLean, 


Leroy 


Cowles, Robert Andrew 


-McLean, 


Bloomington 


Crocker, William 


Macon 


Blue Mound 


Do ud, Herman 


Hancock, 


Ferris 


Eastwood, Byron Evans 


Lee, 


Franklin Grove 


Martin, William Woodrow 


Tazewell, 


Green Valley 


Norton, Arthur Orlo 


Ogle, 


Stillman Valley 


Peasley, William Kennett 


'-McLean, 


Bloomington 


Pike, Walker Franklin 


Madison, 


St. Jacobs 


Scrogin, Ernest Arthur 


McLean. 


Lexington 


Waits, Harmon Bert 


Perry, 


Tamaroa 


Wilson, George Shirley 


Putnam, 


Magnolia 


Wolfe, Albert Benedict 


Bureau, 


Arlington 



76 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



Students Who Have Completed Two Years' Work or More, 



NAMES. 
Aldrich, Blanche 
Babbs, Mary Irene 
Baird, Clementine Maud 
Barton, Olive Lillian 
Beattie, Annie Jeanette 
B6hrin«rer, Cora Louise 
Broadhead, Annie Maple 
Carpenter, Kate Edna 
Clark, Caroline Irving 
Davenport, Bertha Lea 
Davenport, Lula Lea 
Dawson, Olive Leonora 
Dolph, Alice Amelia 
Edmunds, Elma Ruth 
Edmunds, Lucy 
Edwards, Carlie Anne 
Fairfield, Grace 
Fleischer, Ida Lena 
Flinn, Sarah Louvilla 
Franklin, Lois Gertrude 
Fruin. Hannah Letitia 
Hitchcock, Mary Ella 
Hoffman, Anna Maria 
Hummel. Ida Rose 
Hunting Olive 
Ingels, Carrie Lou 
Johnston, Elizabeth Jane 
Johnston. Gertrude Maude 
Kerr. Fannie 
King, Anna T. 
Love. Mary Jane 
Lovering, Harriet Moulton 
McKinney, Bernice 
McWherter, Mary E. 
Neu, Elizabeth Augusta 

Nixon, Isidore Alice 

Peck, Lora Belle 
Regenold, Mabel '/.<«■ 
Sea nlan, Lena < rerl ude 
Schempp, Bertha 
Schneider, Mary Lizzie 



COUNTY. 

*Mc Learn, 
Coles, 
McLean, 
McLean, 
Carroll, 
Whiteside, 
Tazewell, 
Stai^k, 
( Arkansas ), 
Will, 
Will. 
Boone, 
Kendall, 
Grundy, 
Grundy, 
Mcl\ean, 
i McLean, 
McLean, 
Christian, 
Liviug.ston, 
McLean, 
McLean, 
Fayette, 
Ford, 
McLean, 
Cook, 

Sun;) anion, 
( Arkansas ). 
Vermilion, 
Richla/td, 
Ogle, 

Christian, 
Christian, 
Bond, 
Christian, 
DeWitt, 
Whiteside, 
Putnam, 
Mr Lean, 
La Salle, 

Kane, 



POST-OFFICE 

Normal 

Fair Grange 

Bloomington 

Normal 

Ml. Carroll 

Morrison 

Mackinaw 

W //truing 

Helena 

Joliet 

Joliet 

Belvidere 

Piano 

Gardner 

Gardner 

Normal 

Normal 

Normal 

Pan a 

I) i right 

Bloomington 

Normal 

Vandal ia 

Roberts 

Normal 

Chicago 

Llliopolis 

Fort Smith 

Uossville 

Olney 

Elida 

Assumption 
Assumption 

SorC/tto 

I'a/ta 

Clinton 

Sterling 

FI,.,id 

Bloomington 

Troy Grovt 

Klhurn 



ILLINOIS STATK NORMAL UNIVERSITY 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Simmons, Jessie Josephine Hancock, 

Sitherwood, Grace * McLean, 

Stapleton, Alberta Flora Christian, 

Stoutenburg, Nellie Russel Vermilion, 

Taylor, Helen Mary * McLean, 

Trimble, Mary Lillian Tazewell, 

Voorhees, Lucia Isabella Stark, 

Watson, Alice, Perle Pike, 

Wells, Helen Parson Macon, 

Wells, Mary Johnston Macon, 

Whig-am, Jean Gertrude Lake, 

Wise, Anna Will, 

Wiseman, Eva Centennial Douglas, 

Young-, Grace Harriet Montgomery 

Ackert, Earl Wilder L,ee, 

Allen, Charles Henry Shelby, 

Barg-er, Thomas Morse McLean, 

Brown, Benjamin Fletcher '^McLean, 

Cavins, William Ferguson Coles, 

Dawson, Russel Woodford, 

Dewhirst, John Mark Clay, 

Dewhirst, Solomon Homer Clay, 

Dickerson, Oliver Morton Jasper, 

Dutcher, Stephen Albert Pike, 

Dwire, Francis Belmont ( California, ) 

Edmunds, Harold James Crundy, 

Elliot. Charles Herbert St. Clair, 

Flentje, Lewis Edwin Macoupin, 

Gott, Charles Piatt, 

Greenoug-h, Charles Weston * McLean, 

Gunnell, Orville James McLean, 

Hayes, Frank Crawford Schuyler, 

He>s. Ardie Durward Pike, 

Himes, Robert Pollock McLean, 

Hummel, Adam Albert Ford, 

Johnston, Milford L * McLean, 

Jones, Wallace Franklin Stark, 

Jones, Walter Royal Kankakee, 

McCormick, Henry Goodrich McLean, 

McDonald, Dalton Vermilion, 

McGuffin, Ralph Dudley Lake, 

McKinney, John R. Christian, 

McMurry, Karl Franklin McLean, 



POST-OFFICE 

Joetta 

Bloomington 

Assumption 

Rankin 

Bloomington 

T remont 

Wyoming 

Griggsville 

Elwin 

El win 

Aptakisic 

Joliet 

Camargo 

Hillsboro 

Harmon 

Oconee 

Normal 

Normal 

Mattoon 

El Pa so 

Passport 

Passport 

West Liberty 

New Canton 

Los Angeles 

Gardner 

Belleville 

Palmyra 

La Place 

Tuton 

Normal 

Camden 

Pearl 

Normal 

Roberts 

Bloomington 

Wyoming 

Kankakee 

Normal 

Potomac 

Libertyville 

Assumption 

Normal 



78 



AXNTAI, CATALOGUE 



NAMES. COUNTY. POST-OFFICE 

Marquis, Chester Dubois -'McLean Bloomington 

Martin. Myron Samuel Tazewell, Green Valley 

Mize, Addison Roy Madison, Manix, 

Morgan, John William Sangamon, Dawson 

Morgan, Ora Sherman Kane, Hampshire 

Morrell, John Finley Pike, Perry 

Myall, Charles Arthur Cook, Oak Park 

Naffziger, Simon Edward Tazewell, Minier 

Norton, Archie Carlisle Fulton, Farmington 

Perry, Wilson James Ford Melvin 

Pfingsten, George Frederick St. Clair, Millstadt 

Readhimer, Jerome Edward (Louisiana,) Saline 

Reece, John S. Woodford, Cruger 

Reecher, Samuel E. Whiteside, Coleta 

Smith, Charles Henry Woodford, Metamora 

Stewart, Frank Crawford, Oblong 

Stewart, John Pog-ue Henderson, Biggsville 

Stine. John Carl Christian, Assumption 

Taylor, Branch L. ^McLean, Bloomington 

Troxel, Cecil Warren McLean, Normal 

Urban, Harvey Benjamin McLean, Gibson City 

Wakeland, Charles Richland Pulaski, New Grand Chain 

White, Albert Emery Livingston, Blackstone 

Whitten, John Hamilton Stark, Gastleton 

Wilson, Frank Lester McLean, Bloomington 

Wynd, Robert Smith Tazewell, Hopedale 

Young - , James William Vermilion, Bismark 

Young. Noah A. Vermilion, Bismark 



Students Who Have Completed One Year's Work or More, but not Two Years'. 



Adee, Mary Leota 


Winnebago, 


ItocJiford 


Athons, Sadie Chenoweth 


Macon, 


Decatur 


Augustine, < >ra May 


McLean, 


Normal 


Baiter, Grace Mae 


Henry, 


Anna wan 


Baldwin, Delia Lois 


McHi nry, 


Crystal Lake 


Baldwin, Letta May 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Barr, Mabel 


( Indiana, ) 


Fran 1 fort 


Barton, Lizzie 


Grundy, 


Gardner 


Beardsley, Emma Ellen 


Whiteside, 


Pro pin 1 slow it 


Ber1 ra m, .Jennie Campbell 


Kendall, 


Bristol 


Bosworl h. Lucy Adelia 


Cook) 


Eva union 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Boyle. Edna May Kane, 

Boynton, Elmyra Ida McDonough, 

Bracey, Elizabeth Mildred Woodford, 

Branton, Mary Alice Jo Daviess, 

Briggs, Fleta Agatha Tazewell, 

Bright, Bernice Alena * McLean, 

Brooks, Cornelia Kane, 

Brown, Edith ^McLean, 

Bruce, Alice Logan, 

Buerkin, Katharyn Josephine Adams, 

Bullock, Agnes Irene Woodford, 

Bullock, Florence Wing-field Woodford, 

Buss, Bertha Luella Stephenson, 

Camery, Nellie Paris Marshall, 

Campbell, Margaret Boyde Kane, 

Carlson, Alma W. McLean, 

Carpenter, Sarah Jane Stark, 

Chamberlain, Linnie Whiteside, 

Champion, Marie * McLean, 

Chapman, Delia Virginia Woodford, 

Cody, Marguerite Hortense Jvane, 

Coley, Mrs. Minnie Eois Moore St. Glair, 

Conard, Lula Florence Piatt, 

Cook, L/orena Fulton, 

Cronin, Anna Christian, 

Crouch, Virginia Frances Henderson, 

Damert, Harriet Cora Stephenson, 

Dennis, Myrtle Tazewell, 

Dewhirst, Mrs. Alta Clay, 

Dietz, Clara La Salle, 

Dilley, Euella Mae Warren, 

Dillon, Mertie May * McLean, 

Dobbin, Anna Mercy Du Page, 

Dole, Ethel Mary Kankakee, 

Donohue, Anastacia Bureau, 

Drobisch, Alice Wessels Macon, 

Ebersol, Marion Maude Kane, 

Elliott, Winifred Grace Macon, 

Emerson, Mary Wood * McLean, 

Entler, Tillie May Macon, 

Ewen, Ada Esther Will, 

EJwing, Jennie Buyers Mercer, 

Fairchild, Myrtle Florence Vermilion, 



POST-OFFICE 

Aurora 

Prairie City 

Low Point 

Council Hill 

Minier 

Normal 

Aurora 

Bloomington, 

Season 

Quincy 

Eureka 

Eureka 

Lena 

Henry 

Elgin 

Bloomington 

Wyoming 

Erie 

Normal 

El Paso 

Aurora 

0' Fallon 

Monticello 

Fair tie w 

Assumption 

Rozetta 

Lena 

Minier 

Passport 

La Salle 

Moseville 

Normal 

Aurora 

Manteno 

Spring Valley 

Decatur 

Aurora 

Decatur 

Bloomington 

Decatur 

Lockport 

New Windsor 

Danville 



A N Nl'AI ( C ATA LOG V K 



NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


POST-OFFICE 


Findley, Rosana May 


Hendemon, 


Oquawka 


Fisher, Orpha Salome 


Woodford , 


Roanoke 


Fisk, Edith May 


Whiteside, 


Lyndon 


Fristoe, Sidney Belle 


Ford, 


Melvin 


Fritter, Clara Theresa 


Piatt, 


Monticello 


Fritter, Edna Elizabeth 


Piatt, 


Monti cello 


Fuller, Frances Gracia 


Cook, 


F vans ton 


G-ard, Josepha 


Pike, 


New Canton 


Garwood, Anna Sabina 


Fulton, 


Lpava 


Gibbs, Anna Maud 


Whiteside, 


Lyndon 


Gillan, Anna Marion 


Iroquois, 


Wellington 


Gilmer. Eucy Walker 


Adams, 


Quincy 


Godwin, Alice 


Pike, 


Pleasant Hill 


Graham, Ella 


Rock Island, 


Rock Inland 


Grantvedt, Jennie Mary 


Cook, 


Austin 


Griffith, Mabel Frances 


Vermilion, 


Rankin 


Griswold, Florence 


Sangamon, 


Springfield 


Grubel, Mollie Eilene 


Macon, 


Decatur 


Gunsolus, Harriet 


Winnebago, 


Rock ford 


Hackett, Georgia 


Ogle, 


Harper 


Hag-an, Emma Mary 


Whiteside, 


Tampico 


Hall, Bessie Erwin 


{ Nebraska ) 


Omaha 


Hallock, Minnie Julina 


Stark 


Osceola 


Hamilton, Mary Grace 


DeKalb, 


Malta 


Hamilton, Ina Estelle 


Mclean, 


Bloomington 


Handley, Serena Bernice 


Fdwardx, 


Grayoille 


Harpole, Emma 


White, 


Carmi 


Hatcher, Ida May 


Adams, 


Quincy 


Hawkins. Anna 


Perry, 


Tamaroa 


Haynes, Elizabeth Clerk- 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Hays, Mayme Maude 


Piatt, 


Berne nt 


Herrington, Minnie 


Peoria, 


Brimfield 


Hess, Kutha Blanche 


Pike, 


Milton 


Hill, Anne < >phelia 


Adams, 


Quincy 


Hollister, Grace 


Troquis, 


Loda 


I [orton, Mary Louisa 


Pike, 


Horton 


Hummel, Sara li Matilda 


Ford, 


Roberts 


Hunter, Mrs. Bda 


Mc Lean, 


Normal 


I [ussey, Halcyone Belle 


Sangamon, 


Will'iamsville 


Jackson, Alice Elizabel h 


Kane. 


Aurora 


Jackson, ( Hive Ruth 


Champaign . 


Champaign 


Jacob, Mrs. Elki Leone 


( Washington 1 


Pioneer 


.J<.lni-><m. Beulah Valenl ine 


Cook, 


Chicago 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



SI 



NAMES. 

Johonnott, Nellie 
Jones, Jennie May 
Kiick, Esther Katherine 
King, Mabel Hall 
Kintz, Daisy Maud 
Kraeg-er, Grace Clarke 
Eantz, Maude Anna 
Larison, Gertrude 
Eeischner, Sallie Olive 
Lindsey, Lucy Eenore 
Love, Nellie Hanlon 
Lyons, Mary 
McAllister, Jennie Roxa 
McCord, Grace Amanda 
McCrea, Edith Burling-ame 
McCrea, Ida Harkness 
McGreg-or, Elizabeth 
McKinney, Mildred Marg-aret 
McReynolds, Dora 
Maile, Anna Eva 
Major, Birdie 
Mann, Frances Bonnel 
Marks, Celoa Edith 
Marshall, Jessie Wilson 
Martin, Blanche Bradford 
Merk, Frances 
Meyers, Alice Cora 
Meyers, Wilhelmina Adrienna 
Miller, Adelaide Julia 
Miller, Marg-aret Caroline 
Miller, Thena Ellen 
Mills, Edna Gertrude 
Mills, May Katherine 
Mix, Eida Belle 
Moore, Mary Olive 
Morg-an, Mattie 
Morris, Daisy Alice 
Morse, Zoa Bertha 
Mossman, Edith Lena 
Moyer, Verna Alberta 
Muller, Marie C. 
Muthersbaug-h, Emma Maud 
Oakes, Blanche McCormick 



COUNTY. 


POST-OFElCE 


McIIenry, 


Richmond 


Lee, 


Pi no Paw 


Logan, 


Latham 


Kane, 


Elgin 


McLean , 


Blooming ton 


Kane, 


Aurora 


McLean , 


Bloomington 


McLean , 


Bloomington 


Piatt, 


Be Land 


Tazewell, 


Lilly 


Macon, 


Becatur 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Warren , 


Monmouth 


Putman, 


Granville 


Ogle, 


Creston 


Ogle, 


Creston 


Ogle, 


Byron 


Christian , 


Assumption 


Moultrie, 


Bethany 


Will, 


Wilmington 


Bureau, 


Walnut 


Vermilion, . 


Danville 


LaSalle, 


Peru 


Hamilton , 


McLeansboro 


Stephenson, 


Winslow 


Pock Lsland, 


Rock Island 


Stephenson , 


Florence Station 


Stephenson , 


Florence Station 


McIIenry, 


Crystal Lake 


Kankakee, 


Manteno 


Douglas, 


Tuscola 


Putnam, 


Clear Creek 


DeWitt, 


Kenney 


Ogle, 


Oregon 


Pike, 


• Pleasant Hill 


Shelby, 


Oconee 


McLean, 


Leroy 


Lake, 


Oilmer 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean , 


Saybrook 


Cooky 


Arlington Heights 


Macon, 


Decatur 


Winnebago, 


Rockford 



S2 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



NAMES. 


COUNTY. . v 


POST-OFFICE 


O'Brien, Julia Josephine 


DeKalb, 


Elm 


Ocheltree, Mabel 


Champaign, 


LLomer 


Ogle, Fa ye Lela 


Mercer, 


Lteithsburg 


Oxley, Mary Delima 


Mai ion, 


Centralia 


Patterson, Maud Elma 


Pike, 


Pearl 


Pease, Edith Augusta 


Logan , 


Latham 


Peeler, Lizzie E. 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Pfeil, Mary Esther 


Cass, 


Arenzoille 


Pitts, Florence Elizabeth 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Poff, Mary Louise 


Logan, 


Chestnut 


Porter, Eliza Wolfe 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Porter, Nellie 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Potter, Effie Ximena 


Winnebago, 


Llockford 


Powell, Ellen Gertrude 


Hancock, 


Bowen 


Putnam, Helen Clifford 


Sangamon, 


Pleasant Plains 


Quigg, Etta Grace 


Tazewell, 


Minier 


Ratekin, Lola Delle 


■ Warren, 


Swan Creek 


Record, Carrie Ambler 


Macon , 


Decatur 


Reeder, Grace 


McLean, 


Normal 


Reng-el, Elizabeth Bertha 


* McLean , 


Danvers 


Renshaw, Jennie 


Fulton, 


Table Grove 


Richards, Frances Rebecca 


Cook, 


Evanston 


Roberts, Ellen Louis 


Knox, 


.' „ Yates City 


Ross, Elizabeth Ellen 


McLean, 


Saybrook 


Rundle, Phyllis Delle 


Lroquis, 


Loda 


Ryan, Elizabeth 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Schiek, Christena 


Will, 


Mokena 


Schneider, Louise Dora 


McLean 


Bloomington 


Schroeder, Frieda Adelaide 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Seeley, Helen Edna 


Schuyler, 


Littleton 


Selleck, Mary Camilla 


Lroqjiois, 


Buckley 


Shearer, Lelah 


McHenry, 


Woodstock 


Skillin, Florence Bessie 


Cook, 


<>ak Park 


Skinner, Blanche Alberta 


% McLean, 


Normal 


Smith, Kate Belle 


Tazewell, 


Lilly 


Sprechcr, Elizabeth Esther 


Carroll, 


Lanark 


Stansbury, Etta Drucilla 


Peoria, 


Brim lie! (1 


Steep, Maud Winifred 


Grundy, 


Morris 


Stephens, Leilah 


Lee, 


Dixon 


Stoner, EJffie May 


Mm shall, 


Henry 


Stuart, Alta G-ra til 


Macon, 


Oreana 


Swingley, Lida Louise 


Winnebago, 
McLean, 


Uockford 


'riiM!|)r. Luella May 


Normal 



IUJNOIS STATE NOKMAI, UNIVERSITY 



83 



NAMES. 

Tilsv, Carrie 

Titterington, Susan Edgington 

Tjardes, Ida May 

Tobey, Litta 

Todd, Henrietta Mason 

Tregellas, Eme Ada Lillian 

Turner, Gladys 

Unangst, Mabel Alicia 

Vincent, Cora Louise 

Wahl, Nettie May 

Warner, Marguerite Adelle 

Warrick, Emma Sabina 

Waterman, Clara M. 

Watkins, Genorah 

Watson, Edith May 

Webber, Helen 

Webster, Nellie Grace 

Wells, Gertrude 

Wheeler, Hattie Mae 

Wheeler, Mary 

White, Daisy Paota 

White, Maria Elizabeth 

Whittaker, Sadie Olive 

Williams, Mary Bradford 

Wilson, Estella May 

Wilson, Lucy Naomi 

Witt, Maria Irene 

Woltman, Helena Olga 

Woods, Ida Blanche. 

Wyckoff , Irene Bessie 

Young, Adelaide Hayward 

YoUng, Anna Eou 

Adams, Oscar 
Ament, Wilbur Frank 
Arnett, James H. 
Ashworth. Ralph William 
Baker, Frederick Alva 
Bassler, Herman 
Bonnell, Clarence 
Braden, Behring Erie 
Bullock, Forrest Minor 
Burner, Clarence Alva 



COUNTY. 


POST-OFFICE 


Will, 


Alpine 


Rock Island, 


Rock Island 


*McLean, 


Say brook 


Macon, 


Decatur 


Whiteside, 


Sterling 


Fulton, 


Astoria 


Shelby, 


Oconee 


Stephenson, 


Gockrell 


LaSalle, 


Mendota 


Whiteside, 


Sterling 


Winnebago, 


Rockford 


Lasalle, 


LaSalle 


Grundy, 


Verona 


Douglas, 


Newman 


Kane, 


Kaneville 


* McLean, 


Holder 


Iroquois, 


Woodland 


Winnebago, 


Winnebago 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Steplienson, 


Freeport 


Ogle, 


Stillman Valley 


Warren, 


Roseville 


LaSalle, 


Earlville 


Kendall, 


Yorkville 


Woodford, 


Secor 


Piatt, 


DeLand 


Macoupin, 


Virden 


( Missouri, ) 


Neeper 


DeKalb, 


Waterman 


Macon, 


Harristown 


Montgomery, 


Ilillsboro 


( New York, ) 


Sidney 


Edgar, 


Scott Land 


Ogle, 


Kings 


( Ohio ) 


New Vienna 


Ooles, 


Mattoon 


Clark, 


West Union 


Macon , 


Forsyth 


Christian, 


Taylorville 


Macon, 


Bearsdale 


Woodford, 


Eureka 


McLean, 


Normal 



84 



\ NX LA I, CATALOGUE 



NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


POST-OFFICE 


Capen, Bernard Charles 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Carpenter, Lewis Moffitt 


Stark, 


Wyoming 


Carter, Jesse Olin 


Piatt, 


Dement 


Cavins, Stanley Thomas 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


Conard, James Stiles 


Piatt, 


Monticello 


Craig-mile, Alexander Homer 


Champaign, 


Gifford 


Eaton, Charles David 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Edmunds, Ernest Edwin 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Fahnestock, Fred 


Madison, 


Wanda 


Fairchild, James Albert Leroy 


Edgar, 


Warrenton 


Gale, Eli Pike 


*Kane, 


Aurora 


Gowey, Elbert 


Grundy, 


Gardner 


Green, Joseph Wilson 


Will, 


Braidwood, 


Hilyard, Horace Mann 


Monroe, 


Waterloo 


Hippie, Elmer James 


DeKalb, 


Waterman 


Hougland, Walter 


Coles, 


Cook's Mills 


Hultgren, Elmer F. 


Henry, 


Woodhull 


Jackson, John Wesley 


Sangamon, 


Buffalo Hart 


Jacob, William James 


( Washington, ) 


Pioneer 


Kennel, John Jacob 


Tazewell, 


Morton 


Klaas, Lewis Henry 


DeKalb, 


Hinckley 


Kofoid, Reuben 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Livingston, Samuel William 


Madison, 


Poag 


Luke, Edward 


Vermilion, 


Danville 


Miner, Thomas Daniel 


Shelby, 


Quigley 


Nail, William Franklin 


Montgomery , 


Butler 


Otto, Frederick William August 


Ford, 


Mdvin 


Pringle, Maurice Franklin 


Woodford. 


Kappa 


Schneider, Christian Ernest 


Peoria, 


L ) eoria 


Sparks, Claude G. 


Tazewell, 


Mackinaw 


Spear, Harry George 


Vermilion, 


Bismark 


Stout, Henry Field 


Fulton, 


Fair view 


Taylo, Myron DeWitt 


McLean, 


Saybrook 


Taylor, Samuel Martin 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Vir1 lie, Ira Sankey 


.lo Daviess, 


Elizabeth 


Waterman, Wilbur Earnest 


Qrundy, 


Verona 


Webstei , George ( Imar 


Montgomery, 


Nokomis 


Wickersham, Ellis Berl 


Warren, 


Uoscville 


Wighl , Ambrose B. 


DeWitt, 


Waynesville 


Wilson. Rufus EJdgar 


Fayette, 


Bingham 



HJ.INOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY 



85 



Students who have completed less than one year's work. 



NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


POST-OFFICE 


Adams, Inez 


Lawrence, 


Birds 


Albertson, Dorothy Anna 


Tazewell, 


Pekin 


Anderson, Lola Belle 


Macon , 


Maroa 


Arundale, Mary Ellen 


Stark, 


Bradford 


Ash worth, Berta 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


Babcock, Laura E. 


Kane, 


Aurora 


Barth, Mary Elizabeth 


Stark, 


Wyoming 


Barth, Nevada Oella 


Edgar, 


Chrisman 


Bartlett, Olive 


Schuyler, 


Rushville 


Beals, Jessie Eliza 


Cook, 


Chicago 


Bean, Mary Adeline 


Wayne, 


Fairfield 


Bear, Jennie Rees 


Hancock, 


Joetta 


Beatty, Sadie Estelle 


Champaign, 


Howard 


Beck, Mabelle Grace 


Piatt, 


DeLand 


Benthuysen, Daisy Dell 


McIIenry, 


Nunda 


Berg-h, Lillie May 


Bureau , 


Wyanet 


Berkler, Ada Louelda 


Macon, 


Argenta 


Bernst, Mary Christine 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Bevan, Luella 


McLean, 


McLean 


Biehl, Gertrude Augusta 


Douglas, 


Camargo 


Black, Jessie Mary 


Tazewell, 


Green Valley 


Black, Minnie 


Tazewell, 


Green Valley 


Block, Clara Adelheid 


Tazewell, 


Pekin 


Borneman, Anna Helen 


Putnam, 


Mt. Palatine 


Bosworth, Helen Florence 


Cook, 


Evanston 


Boyd, Myrtle May 


Woodford, 


Panola 


Boyle, Nellie Irene 


Ogle, 


Rochelle 


Branson, Edna Lucretia 


Fulton, 


Vermont 


Brennan, Lizzie 


Moultrie, 


Bolton City 


Brenneman, Ella Johanna 


Tazewell, 


Hopedale 


Bricker, Pearl Eddeth 


McLean, 


Normal 


Brooks, Genevra 


Mercer, 


New Windsor 


Brown, Elizabeth Anne Thompsor 


i Morgan, 


Woodson 


Brown, Minnie Ridg-ley 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Bruce, Frances Pearl 


Logan, 


Beason 


Buffett, Harriet Jane 


Lee, 


Dixon 


Bunney, Lizzie May 


*3fcLean, 


Bellefiower 


Burnett, Marion Wylie 


Ifendall, 


Tamarack 


Burns, Nellie Frances 


Mason, 


San Jose 


Burtis, Pearl Edna 


* McLean, 


Hudson 


Byers, Lena Ross 


Knox, 


Altona 



86 



ANNUM CATALOGUE 



NAMES. 

Cameron, Rachel Catherine 
Carlisle, Edna Dean 
Carlson Anna Cecilia 
Case, Clara May 
Cass, Mattie 
Church, Ida Estelle 
Clancey, Nellie Gertrude 
Clark, Grace Darline 
Claypool, Ora Belle 
Clithero, Addie Viola 
Conger, Ethel Margaret 
Copp, Sarah Felicia 
Coriell, Ada E. 
Corman, Florence Mae 
Corson, Estelle Pearl 
Cory, Edna 

Cowden, Mary Eleanor 
Cryer, Minnie Turner 
Daniel, Laura Anabelle 
Davis, Mary Priscilla 
Dawson, Lois Lacona 
Dearth, Hattie Mae 
De Groot, Bertha Alice 
Denham, Pearl 
Desper, Ida Mae 
Deverell, Marianna 
Dickey, Ida Catherine 
Downs, Chloe 
Duffy, Kate 

Duncan, Caroline Elizabeth 
Durant, Edith Katherine 
Eaton, Hattie May 
EickhoH", Emma Marie 
Eldred, Hattie Bolton 
Ellis, Frances Grattan 
Estes, Myrtle Fay 
Btling, Ella Kate 
Ewbank, Maud 
Fahrney, Florence Knowles 
Farmer, Josephine May 
Ferguson, Edith Phila 
Fitzgerald, Mary Rosalba 
Fitzgerald, Sadie Joseghine 



COUNTY. 

Washington, 
Lawrence, 
Knox, 
Will, 

* McLean, 
McLean, 
McLean, 
Kendall, 

* McLean, 
Grundy, 

* McLean, 
Monroe, 
McLean, 
McLean, 
McLean, 
Montgomery, 

( Pennsylvania, ) 

McLean, 

St. Clair, 

Piatt, 

Edgar, 

Woodford, 

Hancock, 

McLean, 

LaSalle, 

Macon , 

Wayne, 

* McLean, 
Mason , 
Knox, 
Cook, 
McLean, 
Mc Henry, 
Grundy, 
Champaign, 
Logan, 

SI. Clair, 

De Witt, 

Kane, 

Marion, 

McLean, 

St. Clair 

Piatt, 



POST-OFFICE 

Ashley 

Chauncey 

Altona 

Joliet 

Bloomington 

McLean 

Bloomington 

Piano 

Gibson 

Mason 

Fletcher 

Waterloo 

Normal 

Bloomington 

Normal 

Butler 

Worth 

Covell 

Belleville 

DeL,and 

Scott Land 

El Paso 

Augusta 

Bloomington 

LaSalle 

Decatur 

Fairfield 

Downs 

Havana 

Altona 

Chicago 

Normal 

Pidge field 

Gardner 

Gifford 

Beason 

Floraville 

Farmer City 

Geneva 

Patoka 

Bloomington 

Wait St. Louis 

Ivesdale 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY 



87 



■ NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


POST-OFFICE 


Ford, Nellie Ellen 


'Tazewell, 


Hopedale 


Fort, Estella May 


DeWitt, 


Kenney 


Fulton, Maud Muller 


Cass, 


Ashland 


Gaffney, Sarah Adelaide 


Mc Henry, 


Hartland 


Gallant, Minnie Lillian 


Fulton, 


Lewiston 


Ganter, Emma Frieda 


St. Clair, 


Floraville 


Gard, Lydia 


Pike, 


Iiinderhook 


Geuther, Bertha Elizabeth 


Will, 


Mokena 


Gibeaut, Stella Maud 


McLean, 


Bloominglon 


Gideon, Flora Belle 


DeWitt, 


Clinton 


Gilbert, Alice Rebecca 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Glover, Elleta May 


Woodford, 


Low Point 


Godwin, Lottie 


Pike, 


Pleasant Hill 


Goss, Minnie Belle 


( Indiana, ) 


Remington 


Graeff, Henrietta Elizabeth 


LaSalle, 


Paw Paw 


Gray, Eleanor 


Adams, 


Coatsburg 


Gray, Evalynn Mae 


LaSalle, 


Streator 


Gray, Lillian 


Adams, 


Coatsburg 


Gray, Mattie Agnes 


Livingston, 


Forrest 


Greer, Sarah 


Cook, 


Evahston 


Gregory, Emma 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Griffith, Nellie 


Vermilion, 


Rankin 


Griswold, Emma 


Piatt, 


Cerro Gordo 


Grubb, Anna Mae 


Adams, 


Payson 


Hall, Eva Robinson 


Vermilion, 


East Lynn 


Harrington, Bessie 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Harris, Lila May 


Cook, 


Chicago 


Hausen, Minnie Adella 


Lee, 


Franklin Grove 


Hayden, Mary Edam 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Heath, Ora Mae 


Piatt, 


White Heath 


Heller, Gertrude Viola 


Woodford, 


Benson 


Herndon, Frances Cordelia Isabella Tazewell, 


Tazewell 


Herring-ton, Cora Elizabeth 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Heslin, Alice Agnes 


Kane, . 


Elgin 


Hester, June 


* McLean, 


Saybrook 


Hickey, Kate 


*McLean, 


Hudson 


Hiltabrand, Lulu Jessie 


Marshall, 


Henry 


.Hinners, Gertrude Emily 


Tazewell, 


Pekin 


'Hinshaw, Hattie Sue 


* McLean, 


Danvers 


Hinshaw, Lettie May 


McLean, 


Woodruff 


Hinson, Olive Estella 


Piatt, 


Cisco 


^Holder, Ella 


*McLean, 


Normal 


Human, Lucy Fanchion 


Peoria, 


Cramers 



N,X 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


POST-OFFICE 


Hook, Mrs. Ora Kelso 


Fulton, 


Lewistovm 


Hopkins, Bessie Lavinia 


Macon, 


Decatur 


Hussey, Pearl Charlotte 


Sangamon , 


Williamsville 


Hutchins, Minnie M. 


Edwards, 


West Salem 


Jack, Edith 


Fulton, 


Farmington 


Jackson, Marguerite Ellen 


Woodford, 


Minonk 


James, Blanche 


*McLean, 


Normal 


Jefferies, Beatrice May 


Bureau, 


La Moille 


Jeffries. Bertha 


Pike, 


Pleasant JLill 


John, Sarah Maud 


Iroquois, 


Woodland 


Johnston, Nina May 


*McLean, 


Hudson 


Jones, Alta May 


* Kankakee, 


Kankakee 


Jones, Neva Clara 


Whiteside, 


Tampico 


Kauble, Nora Pearl 


St. Clair, 


East Si. Louis 


Kelley, Kathryn Frances 


Kane, 


Aurora 


Kelly, Anna Myrtle 


Champaign 


Fisher 


Kelly, Milchrist De Ette 


Henry, 


Qalva 


Kerr, Elnora Daisy 


Montgomery, 


Nokomis 


Keys, Etta 


Logan, 


Beason 


Kindig, Pearl Elizabeth 


Woodford, 


Secor 


Killian, Katherine Camillas 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Kindness, Annie 


Will, 


Lockport 


Koehler, Houlda Emelia 


-McLean, 


Normal 


Kretsinger, Alice Lillian 


Ogle, 


Leaf Iliver 


Landis, Lizzie May 


LaSalle, 


Earlcille 


Laubenheim, Livonia Lena 


Jefferson, 


Belle Rive 


Ledden, Gertrude 


DeWitt, 


Ospur 


Leonard, Alice 


Jo Daviess, 


Nora 


Leonard, Harriet Ada 


Jo Da in ess, 


Nora 


Lewis, Agnes Emily 


Ogle, 


Creston 


Lewis, Alta May 


* McLean, 


Say brook 


Lewis, Fannie 


Pike, 


El Dara 


List, Clara Melinda 


Livingston , 


Strawn 


Livett, Edith Mae 


Edgar, 


LLume 


Lloyd, Helen Ethel 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Long, Clara May 


Stark, 


Bradford 


Lytle, Nellie Gertrude 


Lee, 


West Brooklyn 


McCormick, Nina Mildred 


Menard, 


Oreenview 


Ma< Donald, Amy EJstelle 


LaSalle, 


Triumph 


McDonald, Elizabeth 


LaSalle, 


Slreator 


McGriff, Mary Barris 


Richland, 


Olney 


McGuffie, EJlizabeth 


Logan, 


llarlshurg 


McKee, Mary Mahala 


Sta i h . 


Elrnira 



IUJNOTS STATK NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



89 



NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


POST-OFFICE 


McKittrick, Eydia Ann 


Shelby, 


Tower Hill 


Main, Maude Alma 


Knox, 


Altona 


Maloney, Mary Charlotte 


* McLean, 


Bloomington 


Mammen, Vera M. 


*McLean, 


Bloomingion 


Mann, Isabelle 


Marshall, 


Wenona 


Mann, Willametta 


Crawford, 


Robinson 


Marsh, Harriet Maud 


Mc Henry, 


Richmond 


Marshall, Birdie Abby 


Peoria, 


Brimfield 


Marshall, Cora 


Peoria 


BrimUeld 


Marshall, Mary Edith 


{Indiana, ) 


Rensselaer 


Martin, Nellie Rebecca 


Tazewell, 


Creen Valley 


Maxcy, Nannie 


Sangamon, 


Pasfield 


Meyer, Eliza Mary 


St. Glair, 


Mascoutah 


Miller, Mattie Martha 


Douglas, 


Tuscola 


Miller, Mina Frieda 


Peoria, 


Elmwood 


Miller, Pearl Bae 


Logan , 


Atlanta 


Miller, Susan Caroline 


Pike, 


New Salem 


Mitchell, Cora 


Moultrie, 


Bethany 


Mitchell, Mag-g-ie John 


Effingham , 


Dexter 


Mize, Sarah Eucinda 


Madison 


Manix 


Moon, Minnie 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Mooney, Marg-aret Aug-usta 


Logan, 


Latham 


Moore, Josephine Marie 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Moore, Eizzie Elva 


St. Clair, 


O'Fallon 


Morris, Hannah 


Will, 


Joliet 


Morris, Josephine Estelle 


McRenry, 


Crystal Lake 


Morris, Eouisa M. 


McIIenry, 


Crystal Lake 


Morrissey, Julia Ag-nes 


Tazewell, 


Hopedale 


Morse, Eilly Belle 


Lake, 


LAbertymlle 


Mowry, Adah Mary 


Champaign, 


Champaign 


Neikirk, Mae Aug-usta 


Mason, 


Forest City 


Nelson, Segrid 


Ford, 


Paxton 


Newkirk, Eliza Ann 


Wabash, 


Friendsville 


Newman, Cecilia Caroline 


Ford, 


Paxton 


Nichols, Callie Rovesta 


Macon, 


Macon 


Nichols, Martha 


Mercer, 


Hamlet 


O'Brien, Nellie Prances 


Woodford, 


Roanoke 


Pag-e, Nellie 


Warren, 


Raritari 


Parks, Eaura Ann 


Effingham , 


Dexter 


Parmele, Nellie May 


Cook, 


Chicago 


Patton, Eula Eee 


Christian, 


Assumption 


Peck, Vera Maud 


Henry, 


Woodhull 


Perkins, Marie Ethel 


Warren, 


Roseville 



90 



A M NT A I v C ATA LOGUF, 



NAMES. 

Peterson, Daisy Irene 

Peterson, Ethel Clair 

Phillips, Clara Elma 

Planck, Eulilla May 

Pond, Ella M. 

Pope, Hattie M. 

Prince, Sarah Agnes 

Putnam, Allie 

Putnam, L,ulu 

Cjuinn, Sadie Elizabeth 

Rahtg-e, Harriet Caroline 

Richardson, Ellen 

Ripper, Anneva Magdalene 

Rhoades, Frankie Ann 

Roberts, Stella Claudine 

Robertson, Purl 

Rockenfeller, Emma Elizabeth 

Roder, Mattie May 

Rogde, Elsie 

Rogers, Margaret Ann 

Rose, Alice Eenore 

Rose, Louisa 

Rose, Mary Clara 

Rulison, Mildred Blanche 

Rumer, Minnie Galena 

Rush, Eelah Grace 

Saunders, Celia Eugenie 

Schertz, Clara Rosa 

Schisler, Mary 

Searles, Alice Mae 

Seeley, EJva Belle 

Serpette, Rose Ellen 

Shellenberger, Anna Beatrice 

Shields, Nancy Ann 

Shinn, Levina C. 

Shutts, Helen Margarette 

Sides'. Lorena Ghurchill 

Simon-,, L/ora Gale 

Sinclair. Verne 

Sma lley. Jessie Ma j 

Sinil h. Kva D< 13 

Smith, Elizabeth Margaret 
Smith, Ruth Belle 



COUNTY. 


POST-OFFICE 


Piatt, 


Galesville 


Grundy, 


Verona 


Macon , 


Decatur 


* McLean, 


Hudson 


Menard, 


Greenview 


( Iowa, ) 


Davenport 


Sangamon, 


Mechanicsburg 


Woodford, 


El Paso 


Wabash, 


Bellmont 


Livingston, 


Ancona 


Ford,, 


Piper City 


Schuyler, 


Camden 


Tazewell, 


Sands 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


Winnebago, 


Elida 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


La Salle, 


Streator 


Livingston, 


Pontiac 


Lee, 


Lee 


Boone, 


Belvidere 


Whiteside, 


PropJietstown 


Monroe, 


Columbia 


McLean, 


BelUjlmn r 


Ford, 


Piper City 


St. Clair, 


Maseou/nh 


Iroquois, 


Milford, 


Whiteside, 


Tampico 


Tazewell, 


Peer Creek 


Fulton, 


Astoria 


Grundy 


Minooka 


DeKalb, 


Waterman 


Tazewell, 


Deer Creek 


Tazewell, 


Mackinaw 


Coles, 


Oakland 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


DeKalb, 


Genoa 


Lee, 


Franklin Grove 


1! urea it. 


Princeton 


Cass, 


Ashland. 


Henry, 


Galea 


DeWitt. 


Waynesville 


Tazewelli 


Morion 


Tazewell, 


Morton 



IL.UNOIS STATE NORMAI» UNIVERSITY 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Snider. Evaline Champaign, 

Snodgrass', Gertrude Constance Pike, 

Spalding 1 , Bessie Blanche Macon, 

Spargrove, Lura Eucile Marshall, 

Spring, Nellie Marion, 

Steichen, Mary Anglique Livingston, 

Sterrett, Mary Cline Macon, 

Stewart, Mrs. Blanche Edgar, 

Stone, Flora ETstelle Douglas, 

Stonebraker, Elsie May Woodford, 

Sunderland, Emily Kingman Tazewell, 

Tanner, Bessie Will, 

Thorn, Jennie Christina Lake, 
Thompson, Iva Irene Effingham, 

Thompson, Millie Macon, 

Thornberry, Eva Coral Coles, 

Ticknor, Harriet Isabelle Kane, 

Tobin, Lenore Gertrude Kane, 

Toler, Maud Frances Fulton, 

Tolladay, Mary Macon, 

Tolle, Delia Mercer, 

Trabue, Josephine Augusta Greene, 
Tucker, Harriette May Warren, 

Uzzell, Florence Lillian Madison, 

Vaile, Mary Eleanor *( California, ) 

Vroom, Nettie Ray Kankakee, 

Waggoner, Jerusha Moultrie, 

Wagner, Emilie Monroe, 

Wagner, Louisa Bertha Woodford, 

Wagner, Minnie Joanna LaSalle, 

Wallace, Lura Margaret Warren, 

Wallace, Mary Jane Warren, 

Walters, Cora Viola Liane, 

Weldon, Margaret Rose *McLean, 

Wells, Helen Josephine LaSalle, 

Wettstein, Orva Baumbach Ogle, 

Wheelwright, Iva Gertrude Woodford, 

Whitcher, Viola Gertrude Stark, 

White, Grace DeKalb, 

Whitmore, Bessie LaSalle, 

Wickizer, Sylvia Alyce Lroquois, 

Wilson, Alice Stephenson, 

Winchell, Dollie Edna Henry, 



POST-OFl-ICK 

Bondville 

Hulls 

Decatur 

Wenona 

Centralia 

Dwight 

Decatur 

Paris 

Newman 

El Paso 

Delavan 

Wilmington 

Milium 

Shumway 

Macon 

Mattoon 

Elgin 

Gilberts 

Astoria 

Decatur 

New Boston 

Greenfield 

Roseoille 

Bethalto 

San Diego 

Deselm 

Bruce 

Columbia 

Metamora 

Peru 

Coldbrook 

Coldbrook 

South Elgin 

Normal 

Streator 

Rochelle 

Roanoke 

Wyoming 

Shabbona 

Ransom 

Wellington 

Freeport 

Yorktown 



92 



ANNUM, CATALOGUE 



NAMES. 

Witherell, Winifred Helen 
Wrig-ht, Maud Mildred 
Wynd, Mabel Clare 
Zoll, Caroline 
Zoll, Mary Elizabeth 
£ook, Florence Neal 

Ashley, Burton Floyd 
Arter, Gilbert Henry 
Atherton, Edward Jonathan 
Aughinbaugh, Arthur 
Baechler, George Wayland 
Baker, Clarence 
Barkmeier, Hiram Jonathan 
Barth, Amos Oswald 
Bartlett, Harry Cyrus 
Beck, William Victor 
Beckett, David Crawford 
Bennett, Jay S. 
Berry, Orland Harley 
Billen, Adolph Phillip 
Borah, James Alfred 
Britton, Claude Duval 
Brooks, Samuel John 
Bruce, Benjamin 
Burner, Charles Ross 
Burroughs, Dillon 
Burton, John Franklyn 
Camp, John Jay 
Campbell, Josephus Winthrop 
Carpenter, Alonzo Creighton 
Gavins, Lester Blake 
Clark, Herbert Fletcher 
Coates, Lester Helmer 
Cornell, Edward Pike 
Criss, Edward 
Crouch, Samuel 
Cusick, John Fay 
Dawson, Judge Leighton 
Dillavon, Walter Ernest 
Dillon, Kay 
Downs, Elmer Ellsworth 

K.i -lev, Joseph Bone 



OCUNTV. 


POST-OFFICE 


Winnebago, 


Rochford 


Coles, 


Matioon 


'Tazewell, 


Hopedale 


LaSalle, 


Rutland, 


Fulton, 


Lewisto/cn 


Ricldand, 


Olney 


*Ford, 


Sibley 


Knox, 


Galesburg 


Sangamon, 


Pleasant Plains 


Shelby, 


Oconee 


Marshall, 


Lacon 


Shelby, 


Prairie Home 


Mason , 


San Jose 


Lee, 


Paw Paw 


Madison, 


Colli nsville 


Montgomery, 


Walshville 


{Ohio,) 


Fair Haven 


Lee, 


Paw Paw 


Pike, 


Pleasant Hill 


St. Glair, 


Belleville 


Wayne, 


Fairfield 


Mason, 


Mason City 


Logan, 


Natrona 


Logan, 


Reason 


Crawford, 


Robinson 


Crawford, 


Oblong 


Schuyler, 


Brooklyn 


Woodford, 


Metamora 


(Arkansas,) 


Point Cedar 


Stark, 


Wyoming 


Coles, 


Matioon 


DeKalb, 


BeKalb 


x McLean , 


Bloomington 


Kane, 


Aurora 


Pike, 


Pleasant Hill 


Henderson, 


Rozetla 


Edgar, 


Chrisman 


Edgar, 


Scott Land 


Piatt, 


Be Land 


■McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Boivns 


Sangamon, 


Diver non 



IUJNOIS STATK NOKMAI, UNIVERSITY 



93 



NAMES. 

Eg r gers, Charles 
Ely, William Ray 
Ernst, Jacob Emmett 
Ernst, Reno Montgomery Hest 
Eustice, James Alfred 
Evelsizer, Charles H. 
Fleming - , Dio Chalmers 
Ford, Edward 
Forden, James Russel 
Francis, Charles Henry 
Fuller, William Benton 
Funk, Aaron Eynn 
Gammill Finis Isgrig 
Gaston, William Tracy 
Gillum, Francis Hill 
Gore, Charles Philip 
Graybill, Thomas Perry 
Gross, Charles Ellsworth 
Hainline, Jesse W. 
Hand, William Sherman 
Hausen, Henry Warren 
Herington, George B. 
Hess, Absalom 
Hoke, Josiah Campbell 
Holeman, Bert William 
Hollis, David Preston 
Hursh, George Roy 
Huston, Robert F. 
Jeffries, William Jerdell 
Jester, Elijah Tilman 
Jones, Elijah 
Jones, U. V. 
Kindness, William John 
Krug, William Duncan 
Lane, Arthur Lawrence 
Earocque, Zephiere Samuel 
Earson, George 
Eindsey, Willard Brinton 
Eogan, Chester Russell 
Eogan, Robert Newby 
Eubbers, Reemt Eike 
McKnig-ht, Joseph 
McWherter, Robert Franklin 



COUNTY. 


POST-OFFICF, 


Bureau, 


Manlius 


Grundy, 


Mason 


Coles, 


Humboldt 


Shelby, 


Todd's Point 


Jo Daviess, 


Stockton 


Tazewell, 


Beer Creek 


Fulton, 


Canton 


Tazewell, 


Hopedale 


Sangamon, 


Springfield 


La Salle, 


BOstant 


Iroquois, 


Woodland 


Piatt, 


Cerro Gordo 


Coles, 


Frilla 


Marion, 


Carter 


Macon, 


Boody 


Lawrence, 


Latorenceville 


Shelby, 


Clarksburg 


Piatt, 


Cerro Gordo 


McLean, 


Normal 


Crawford, 


Robinson 


Lee, 


Franklin Grove 


McLean, 


Normal 


Pike, 


Pearl 


Moultrie, 


Sullivan 


Warren 


Roseville 


Pike, 


Nebo 


Piatt, 


BeLand 


Macon, 


Argent a 


Livingston, 


Campus 


Vermilion, 


Potomac 


Shelby, 


Lakewood 


Edgar, 


Chrisman 


Will, 


Lockport 


Iroquois, 


Thawville 


Shelby, 


Tower Hill 


Kankakee, 


Manteno 


Grundy, 


Lisbon 


Lawrence, 


Birds 


Christian, 


Edinburgh 


Coles, 


Ashmore 


Logan, 


Emden 


"McLean, 


Normal 


Bond, 


Sorento 



94 



ANNUM, CATAr.Or.l'K 



NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


POST-OFFICE 


Madden, Frank E. 


'■'McLean, 


Normal 


Marsh, Charles 


DeWitt, 


Weldon 


Melvin, Christopher James 


Ford, 


Piper City 

DeLand 

Oconee 


Morgan, George Edward 


Piatt, 


Morgan, James William 


Shelby, 


Murphy, James Russell 


Whiteside, 


Rock Falls 


Noble, Clark 


Jersey, 


Otterville 


Norton, Ralph Edgar 


Fulton, 


Farmingtvh 
Mantetio 


Parker, Abram Hays 


Kankakee, 


Parks, Robert C. 


Shelby, 


Quigley 7 


Perring, Roy Dodge 


Champaign, 


Gifford 


Petty, Clarence Melville 


Lawrence, 


Sumner 


Philbrook, Eowell Mason 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Phillips, Eugene Martin 


Stephenson, 


Damascus 


Pottenger, James Wilson 


Kankakee, 


LCankakee 


Poust, Roy Merton 


DeKalh, 


Kingston 


Rape, Arthur Orville 


Christian, 


Taylorville 


Rayner, Edward S. 


* McLean, 


McLean 


Reeder, John Corwin 


Coles, 


Humboldt 


Rice, William Grimes 


Coles, 


Mattoon 


Richardson, James Harry 


Marion , 


Centralia 


Robinson, Isaac Hayes Plant 


Will, 


Wilton Center 


Rodhouse, Eugene 


Pike, 


Pleasant Hill 


Ropp, Alvin K. 


Tazewell, 


Tremont 


Ropp, Irwin 


* McLean, 


Yuton 


Rose, Fred Waylaud 


Grundy, 


Mazon 


Rounds, William Edgar 


* McLean, 


Normal 


Ruble, George M. 


Macon, 


Decatur 


Russell, Robert Ira 


{Indiana, ) 


Remington 


Scott, Purl A. 


Edgar, 


Chris uatu 


Sempsrott, John A. 


Crawford, 


Trimble 


Sheffler, William Whitmer 


Shelby, 


Pra irie Home 


Shempf, Mack William 


Shelby, 


Pana 


Shields, John Elburt 


Coles, 


Oakland 


Shinkle, Vincent Garmati 


McLean, 


Norma! 


Simmons, Jay Claude 


Hancock 


Fount (tin <!> e&i 


Skinner, Guy Warren 


■''McLean, 


Hudson 


Small. Byron Charles 


Grundy, 


Verona 


Smith, Gale 


* McLean , 


Normal, 


Smith, Louis Meridice 


Pike, 


Nebo 


Smit h. < Irsou Ray 


Tazewell, 


Ilopedale 


Smi1 li, Roy ( )<l<n 


Macon, 


Rood 1 i 


Spainhour, Thomas Abraham 


I)e Witt, 


Lane 



ITJJNOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY 



95 



NAMES. COUNTY. 

Sparks, George Sherman Champaign. 

Spiller, Horace Andrews Stephenson, 

Spitzer, Edward {Virginia,) 

Stiffler, Perry Grundy, 

Stoner, Harold Brinton Marshall, 

Sullivan, William Henry Vermilion, 

*Tobias, Charles Clinton Tazewell, 

Trimble, Ashley Tell Crawford, 

Tuttle, Georg-e D. Kendall, 

Ullensvang, Ears Lee, 

fUnderwood, James Corbie DeWitt, 

Unland, Roscoe Eambert Tazewell, 

Uzzell, Albert Werner Madison, 

Virtue, Joseph Daniel Jo Daviess, 

Wakeland, Marion Franklin {Indiana,) 

Walter, William Oscar Stephenson, 

Webster, Walter Edwin Pike, 

Wheelwright, Edward Newton Woodford, 

. White, Forest Charles Livingston, 

i Wilson, Charles Albert Vermilion 

^Wilson, James William Coles, 

Wright, David John Sangamon, 

Yoder, Carl Henry Iroquois, 



POST-OFFICE 

Homer 
Lena 

Mayland 

Mazon 

Varna 

Blue Grass 

Allentown 

Trimhle 



Steward. 

Kennedy 

Delavan 

Bethalto 

ElizabetJt 

Idaville 

Afolkey 

Pleasant Hill 

Roanoke 

Blacks tone 

Danville 

Janesville 

Buffalo Hart 

Wellington 



Summary. 



Special students 
Senior class, - 
Second class, 
Third class, 
Fourth class, 

Total, - 



16 

53 

111 

263 

446 

891 



Expelled. 
tNot permitted l< 



96 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



Table 



SHOWING ATTENDANCE BY COUNTIES OF STUDENTS RECEIVING FKEH 

TUITION. 



Adams 


8 


Bond 


2 


Bureau 




Boone , 


2 


Carroll 


3 


Cass 

Champaign 

Christian 

Clark 

Clay 


. . . . 3 

10 

13 

1 

3 


Coles 


. . .21 


Cook . . 


. .16 


Crawford 

DeKalb 


.... i 
11 


DeWitt 


13 


Douglas. . 


... 6 


DuPage 

Edgar 


.. .. 1 

10 


Edwards 


2 


Effingham 

Fayette 


3 

2 


Ford 


. . . .12 


Fulton 


.... 15 


Gallatin ........ 

Greene 


. .. . 1 
1 


Grundy 


17 


Hamilton 

Hancock 

Henderson ... . 


1 

6 

....4 



Three other pupils 
students from McLean 



Henry 

Iroquois 13 

Jasper 1 

Jefferson 1 

Jersey 1 

Jo Daviess 

Kane 

Kankakee 

Kendall 

Knox 

Lake 

LaSalle 

Lawrence 5 

Lee 13 

Livingston 9 

Logan 13 

McDonough 1 

McHenry 10 

McLean 72 

Macon : . .34 

Macoupin 2 

Madison 9 

Marion 7 

Marshall 

Mason 

Menard 

Mercer 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

from other states, and seventy-one additional 
county paid tuition at the rate of $30 per year. 



Morgan 1 

Moultrie 5 

Ogle 14 

Peoria 7 

Perry 2 

Piatt 22 

Pike 23 

Pulaski 1 

Putnam 6 

Richland 3 

Rock Island. . • 3 

Sangamon 13 

Schuyler 5 

Shelby 19 

Stark 14 

St. Clair 13 

Stephenson 12 

Tazewell 37 

Vermilion 15 

Wabash 2 

Warren 11 

Washington 1 

Wayne 3 





White.. . 


1 


5 


Whiteside 


. ... 15 





Will.. 


..15 


<> 


Winnebago 


.... 9 


4 


Woodford 


. .. .25 


7 


Other States.. . 


....23 



[ILLINOIS STATE NOKMAI, UNIVERSITY. 



97 



Pupil Teachers, 



•First Class. 



BEGGS, DOROTHY K. 
CHICKEN, SADA R. 
COOPER, ANNETTE B. 
CORSON, MABEL MAUDE 
COWLES, BESSIE A. 
CURTIS, S. MACY 
DILLON, JESSIE 
EDMUNDS, ELMA R. 
ELLIOTT, GEORGIA 
FINCHAM, NELLIE 
FLINN, SARAH E. 
FRANK, MARGARET 
GRASSMANN, ADELAIDE A. 
HAMBLIN, MRS. ELLEN F. 
HUMPHREY, ANABEL 
KAISER, WILHELMINE 
KERNS, CARRIE 
KING, ANNA 
LANGE, OTTILIE 
LENT2, MARY 



LESEM, JOSEPHINE 
LYONS, MARIEN 
MONROE, GRACE A. 
MORSE, FANNIE E. 
PITTS, HENRIETTA 
RICKARDS, MARY A. 
RIGGS, MRS. LILLA D. 
ROSS, SILVA 
ROZIENE, ADDIE E. 
SMITH, NANO P. 
SNELL, CLARA M. 
STETZLER, EMMA G. 
SULLIVAN, MARY 
TAYLOR, HELEN M. 
TRAVIS, CARRIE 
WHITE, DAISY P. 
WILLIAMS, JULIA 
WILMER, ANNA 
WISE, ANNA 
WRIGHT, EMILIE 



BROWN, BENJAMIN F. 
BUMGARNER, JOSEPH 
COLEMAN, LYMAN H. 
CROCKER, Wm. 
DOUD, HERMAN 
EASTWOOD, BYRON E. 
ELLIOTT, CHARLES H. 
HESS, ARDIE 
JOHNSON RILEY O. 



MARTIN Wm. W. 
MIZE, ADDISON RAY 
MYALL, CHARLES A. 
PFINGSTEN, GEORGE 
PIKE, WALTER 
STUART, JOHN P. 
WAITS, HARMON 
WILSON, GEORGE S. 
WOLFE, A. B. 



F 



*The first-class contains the names of those who have been in school during- the 
year 1897-1898 and have taught four full terms of approved work in the Practice School. 
Those of the second-class have taught three terms, the third-class two terms, and the 
fourth-class one term of approved work. 

—8 



98 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



Second Class. 



AUGUSTINE, ORA 
BAIRD. TINA M. 
BALDWIN, DELL A L. 
BARTON, OLIVE L. 
BRACEY, ELIZABETH M. 
BRIGGS, FLETA A. 
CHAMBERLIN, LINNIE 
CLEVELAND, LIDA 
DAWSON, OLIVE L. 
DOLPH, ALICE 
FRANKLIN, LOIS G. 
HALLOCK, MINNIE J. 
HAMILTON, INA 
HITCHCOCK, ELLA 
HOLLISTER, GRACE A. 

DEWHIRST, SOLOMON H. 
DICKERSON, OLIVER M. 
JONES, WALTER R. 



HUMMEL, IDA R. 
LOVERING, HARRIET M. 
MILLER, MARGARET 
PECK, LORA B. 
PORTER, EVA 
POTTER, EFFIE 
PUTNAM, HELEN C. 
SCANLAN, LINA G. 
SCHNEIDER, LOUISE D. 
SIMMONS, JESSIE J. 
STAPLETON, ALBERTA 
WATSON, ALICE P. 
WELLS, HELEN P. 
YOUNG, GRACE 

SPARKS, CLAUDE G. 
WHITTEN. JOHN H. 



Third Class, 



ATHONS, SADIE 
BARR, MABEL 
BOHRINGER, CORA L. 
BRANTON, MARY ALICE 
BUERKIN, KATHERINE 
CAMPBELL, MARGARETTE B. 
CARPENTER, KATE E. 
CLARK, CAROLINE I. 
CODY, HORTENSE 
COLEY, MINNIE L. 
CORMAN, FLORENCE 
DAVENPORT, BERTHA L. 
DEVEREL, MARIANNA 
DROBISCH, ALICE L. W. 
EBERSOL, MARION M. 
EDMUNDS, LUCY 
ELLIOTT, WINIFRED o 
EXTLEk. TILLIE M. 
BWEN, ADA E. 
FLEISCHER, IDA L. 
FRISTOE, SIDNEY I'». 
(.RAXTVEDT. JEJNNIE M 



HALLOCK, MINNIE J. 
HORTON, MARY L. 
HUMMEL, SARAH M. 
INGELS, CARRIE 
KERR, FANNY 
KING, MABEL 
LANT2, ANNA M. 
LARISON, GERTRUDE 
McCREA, IDA H. 
McKINNEY, JULIA 
MEEK, FRANCES 
MILLS, MAY 
MIX, LIDA B. 
MI£E, SARAH L. 
NIXOX. ISIDORE A. 
MUTHERSBAUGH, EMMA 
OAKES, BLANCHE M. 
OGLE, LEX A F. 
PATTERSON, MAUD E. 
PHILLIPS, CLARA 
RECORD, CARRIE 
SCHNEIDER, MARY L. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



99 



schiek, christina 
seeley, helen e. 
sterritt, mary c. 
stephens, lula 
tobey, litta 
todd, henrietta 

ackert, erle w. 
dewhirst, john m. 
edmunds, harold 
gott, charles 
hummel, adam a. 
jacob, wm. j. 
Mcdonald, dalton 



TRIMBLE, MARY L. 
VOORHEES, LUCIA I. 
WARNER, MARGARET 
WHIGHAM, JEAN 
WISEMAN, EVA 
WALTMANN, HELENA 

McGUFFIN, RALPH D. 
MORGAN, ORA S. 
NORTON, ARCHIE 
PERRY, WTLSON JAMES 
READHIMER, JEROME E. 
REECE, JOHN 
TROXEL, CECIL 



Fourth Class. 



BABBS, MARY L. 
BAKER, GRACE M. 
BEATTIE, ANNA J. 
BOSWORTH, LUCY A. 
BOYLE, EDNA MAY 
BROADHEAD, ANNA M. 
BROOKS, CORNELIA 
BROWN, ELIZABETH 
BUFFETT, HARRIETT 
CLANCY, NELLIE T. 
DAVENPORT, LULU L. 
DIETZ, CLARA 
DONOHUE, ANASTACIA 
DURANT, EDITH K. 
FAIRCHILD, MYRTLE F. 
FAIRFIELD, GRACE 
FRITTER, CLARA T. 
FRITTER, EDNA E. 
GILMER, LUCY M. 
GRAHAM, ELLA 
HALL, BESSIE E. 
HAYNES, ELIZABETH C. 
HATCHER, IDA M. 
HERRINGTON, MINNIE 
HESLIN, ALICE A. 
HILTENBRANDT, JENNIE E. 
HUSSEY, HALCYON B. 
JACKSON, ALICE E. 



jacob, mrs. ella l. 
johnston, elizabeth j. 
love, nellie h. 
lyons, mary 
McAllister, jennie 
mann, frances 
miller, thena e. 
moore, mary o. 
morris, daisy a. 
morse, zoa b. 
moyer, verna a. 
neu, elizabeth 
o'brien, julia 
regenold, mabel z. 
ryan, elizabeth, 
selleck, mary c. 
simons, lora g. 
sitherwood, grace 
tobin, lenore g. 
tolle, delia 
tolliday, mary 
vincent, cora l. 
wahl, nettie may 
wallace, lina marg. 
wells, helen j. 
wells, mary j. 
williams, mary b. 
wright, maud m. 



100 



ANNUA!, CATALOGUE 



BARGER, THOMAS M. 
BRADEN, ERLE 
BONNELL, CLARENCE 
CARTER, JESSE A. 
CRAIGMILE, ALEXANDER H. 
DWIRE, FRANCIS B. 
FORDEN, JAMES R. 
GREEN, JOSEPH W. 
HIMES, ROBERT 
JONES, W. FRANKLIN 
LIVINGSTON, SAMUEL W. 
MARTIN, MYRON S. 



MINER, THOMAS D. 
MORRELL, J. F. 
NAIL, WILLIAM F. 
NAFFZIGER, SIMON E. 
PRINGLE, M. F. 
RIECHER, SAMUEL E. 
STOUT, HENRY F. 
URBAN, HARVEY BENJ. 
WHITE, ALBERT E. 
WICKERSHAM, ELLIS B. 
YOUNG, JAMES 



First Class, - 
Second Class, 
Third Class, 
Fourth Class, 



Summary. 



MEN 


WOMEN 


TOTAL 


18 


40 


58 


5 


29 


34 


14 


56 


70 


23 


56 


79 



60 



181 



241 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY 



101 



Practice School, 



Grammar Department, 





GRAMMAR GRADES. 




NAMES. 


COUNTY. 


POST-OFFICE 


Bishop, Lulu 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Bright, Fannie 


McLean, 


Normal 


Coen, Margaret 


McLean, 


Normal 


Coith, Clara 


McLean, 


Normal 


Coith, Edna 


McLean, 


Normal 


Condon, Erne 


[Michigan,) 


Marquette 


Crig-ler, Nina 


McLean, 


Normal 


Dillon, Bessie 


McLean, 


Normal 


Dillon, Ethel 


McLean, 


Normal 


Gregory, Eois 


McLean, 


Normal 


Haitz, Mamie 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Hiett, Ola 


McLean, 


Normal 


Humphrey, Jessie 


McLean, 


Normal 


Jackson, Virginia 


McLean, 


Normal 


Johnston, Edna 


McLean, 


Normal 


Eutz, Mabel 


McLean, 


Normal 


Mace, Ruth 


McLean, 


Normal 


Mavity, Mary 


McLean, 


Normal 


McMahan, Ella 


Logan, 


Chestnut 


McNeil, Grace 


McLean, 


Normal 


Milliken, Ora 


McLean, 


Normal 


Oringdulph, Bessie 


McLean, 


Normal 


Poulton, Winnie 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Proctor, Norma 


McLean, 


Normal 


Rosenberry, Ethel 


McLean, 


Normal 


Smith, Helen 


McLean, 


Normal 


Smith, Marian 


McLean, 


Normal 


Smitson, Eaura 


McLean, 


Normal 


Stanger, Montanna 


McLean, 


Normal 


Thompson, Ethel 


McLean, 


Normal 


VanHook, Nellie 


McLean, 


Normal 


Waterman, Edna 


Grundy, 


Verona 



102 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



NAMES. 
Allen, Jay 
Beadle, Elbert 
Beadle, Homer 
Crig-ler, Clute 
Dick, Carl 
Dick, Fred 
Dillon, Chester 
Dillon, Ralph 
Evans, Mark 
Gantz, Irvin 
Gregory, Herbert 
Haitz, Charles 
Helmick, Russell 
Hetfield, Miller 
Hibler, Herbert 
Hilyard, Perry 
Hines, William 
Hussey, Alfred 
Hutchin, Elberon 
Iliff, Harry 
Jones, Alba 
Krebaum, Carl 
Kuhn, Louie 
Lindblad, Edwards 
Lord, Emery 
Lord, Guy 
Martin, Warren 
McCord, Freeman 
McWherter, George 
McWherter, Paul 
Stansbury, Leslie 
Vaile, William 
VanHook, Herbert 
Weldon, James 
Wentz, Ray 
Witmer, Leroy 



Borms, Mary 
Boyefr, Christine 
Bruce, Pearl 
Cryer, Minnie 
Denfi'am: Pearl 



COUNTY. 


POST-OFFICE 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Bloomin y ton- 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Nor nud 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Monroe 


Waterloo 


McLean, 


Shirley 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


Mason, 


Havana 


McLean, 


Louie 


31c Lean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


{California, ) 


San Diego 


McLea n . 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


McLean, 


Normal 


)RY CLASS. 




Will, 


Peotone 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


Logan, 


Beaso?i 


McLean, 


Bloomington 


McLean, 


Bloomington 



.H.UNOIS -STATE NOKMAl UNIVERSITY 



103 



NAMES. 
Dnnmire, Daisy 
Eaton, Mae 
Ferguson, Edith 
Gregory, Aggie 
Hinshaw, Mae 
Homan, Lucy 
James, Anna 
Jepson, Effie 
Lewis, Fannie 
McKelvie, Mary 
Miller, Pearl 
Mund, Bertha 
Organ, Delia 
Ouinn, Nellie 
Rautz, Carolyn 
Turner, Carrie 
Waltmann, Matilda 
Zeller, Clara 

Baum, Otto 
Fait, Charles 
Franzen, Theodore 
Grace, Elijah N. 
Herrington, George B. 
James, Roy 
Krug, W. D. 
Lengfelder, Louis 
Miller, Emile 
Philbrook, L. M. 
Pottenger, J. W 
•'.Robinson, Hayes 
Smith, Charles 
Stuck ey, Leo 
Wallace, Charles 
Williams, J. H. 
Wilson, George 



COUNTY. 

Woodford, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

Peoria, 

Woodford. 

McLean, 

Pike, 

Coles, 

Logan , 

St. Clair, 

Ford, 

McLean, 

Kankakee, 

Woodford, 

( Missouri, ) 

Woodford, 

Monroe, 

Sangamon, 

Livingston, 

Scott, 

McLean, 

McLean , 

Lroquois, 

Jefferson, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

Kankakee, 

Will, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

( West Virginia, 

McLean , 



post-office 

Kappa 

Normal 

Bloomington 

Bloomington 

Danvers 

Cramer 

Roanoke 

Normal 

El Bar a 

Cook's Mills 

Atlanta 

East Corondalet 

Paxtofi 

Bloomington 

Bourbonnais 

Kappa 

Neeper 

Spring Bay 

Wartburg 

Llliopolis 

Odell 

Exeter 

Normal 

Normal 

Thawville 

Mt. Vernon 

Normal 

Normal 

Kankakee 

Wilton Center 

Anchor 

Hudson 

Hudson 

Siloam 

Normal 



Broadhead, Lemma 
Gay, Mary 
Richards, Florence 
Shinkle, Alice 
Snow, Vera 
Wilson, Maude 



NINTH YEAR. 

McLean, 
Pike, 
McLean , 
McLean, 
McLean, 
Rock Island, 



* *■ + 9~ * 
Normal • 

Rockport 

Normal 

Normal 

Bloomington 

Rural 






104 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



NAMES. 

Burt, Asher 
Chambers, Willie 
Gay, James 
Howell, Frank 
Sage, Chester 
Stubbleheld, 



COUNTY. 

McLean, 

McLean, 

Pike, 

McLean, 

McLean, 

McLean, 



POST-OFFICE 

Normal 

Bloomington 

Rockport 

Bloomington 

Normal 
Normal 



Grammar Grades, 
Preparatory Class, 
Ninth Year, 



Total. 



Girls, 
Boys, 



Summary. 



68 
40 
12 

120 



61 

59 



Total. 



120 



II.UNOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 



105 



Intermediate Department, 



Bates, Laura 
Beadle, Mabel 
Beadle, Maud 
Bricker, Jessie 
Brown, Etta 
Coen, Eleanor 
Coith, Edna 
Courtright, Minnie 
Craig", Edith 
Crooks, Lucy 
Dillon, Alice 
Felmley, Mildred 
Felmley, Ruth 
Goodspeed, Ada 
Goodspeed, Laura 
Graves, Helen 



Gregory, Lois 
Haitz, Etta 
Haitz, Mamie 
Haney, Alice 
Heller, Lottie 
Hibler, Bruce 
Hiett, Lela 
Hopper, Florence 
Huffington, Grace 
Irwin, Hazel 
Knott, Grace 
Lord, Mamie 
Mace, Ruth 
McCormick, Ella 
McNeil, Grace 
McNeil, Hazel 



Martens, Anna 
Martin, Maude 
Moody, Brilla 
Morse, Marguerite 
Myers, Irene 
Poulton, Winnie 
Schad, Irma 
Shanklin, Ada 
Sinclair, Anna 
Smith, Alice 
Smith, Helen 
Smith, Lucia 
Smitson, Nellie 
Taylor. Ocela 
Walker. Mildred 
Watkins, Alma 



Beck with, Harry 
Bedinger, Franklin 
Bricker, Norman 
Bright, Reuben 
Broadhead, Chas. 
Burwell, Clyde 
Coith, Alvin 
Crigler, Burr 
Denton, Earle 
Dick, Harry 
Dillon, Chester 
Dillon, Claire 
Dillon, Ralph 
Ferguson, Claude 
Ferguson, Lowell 
Goodspeed, James 
Gregory, Herbert 
Haitz, Georg-e 



Harg-itt, Merton 
Hetfield, Miller 
Hook, Kenneth 
Hospes, Richard 
Hussey, Alfred 
Jackson, Leig-h 
Jackson, Lester 
Johnson, Roy 
Kettering, Raymond 
Kirkpatrick, Chas. 
Kuhn, Waldo 
Lindblad, Arthur 
Loehr, William 
Lord, Emory 
Lutz, David 
Mace, Lamar 
Mowrer, Paul 
Oringdulph, Asa 



Patterson, Stephen 
Pollitt, Thurman 
Poulton, Chas. 
Reeves, Elton 
Reeves, Thornton 
Wayne, Reid 
Riley, Carl 
Rollins, Dana 
Rosenberry, Earl 
Sage, Harold 
Schad, William 
Schad, Stuart 
Shinkle, Eddie 
Shirk, Willie 
Stansbury, Leslie 
Stoltze, Carl 
Van Hook, Herbert 



Girls enrolled, 48; bovs enrolled, 53; total, 101. 



106 



ANNUM, CATALOGUE 



Primary Department, 



Beadle, Ethel 
Bolin, Bertha 
Bolin, Leota 
Brown, Beulah 
Brown, Verne 
Burwell, Alice 
Craig - , Edith 
Denton, Florence 
Fairchild, Adelaide 
Fisher, Nellie 
Graves, Helen 
Griggs, Dorothy 
Hamill, Wahneita 
Hargitt, Daisy 

Bath, Tommy 
Bricker, Oran 
Burwell, Harold 
Clark, Earl 
Collins, Irl 
Davis, William 
Dewhirst, Joseph 
Dodge, Chester 
Eaton, Bennie 
Erskine, Ralph 
Ferguson, Claude 
Ferguson, Herbert 
Ferguson, Lowell 
Gardner, Fred 
Gardner, Lewis 



Hopper, Florence 
Johnston, Florence 
Kerrison, Cora 
Kuhn, Nellie 
Lewis, Celia 
Lindblad, Darlien 
McCormick, Ella 
McKnight, Myrtle 
McMurry, Ruth 
McNeil, Hazel 
Marshall, Clara 
Marshall, Mattie 
Martens, Louise 
Miller, Pearl 

Gunnell, Myers 
Haitz, Sammy 
Hamill, Eugene 
Hargitt, Merton 
Holder, Charlie 
Houchin, George 
Irvin, Delmar 
Jackson, John 
Kerrison, Marcus 
Lindblad, Nelson 
Lufkin, Hamilton 
McMurry, Donald 
Miner, Charles 
Moore, Homer 
Morse, Heber 



Morse, Sadie 
Morse, Lucile 
Ogle, Velma 
Shanklin, Olive 
Sinclair, Anna 
Smith, Lucia 
Stansbury, Anna 
Vail, Marguerite 
VanHook, Ethel 
Wells, Grace 
West, Phyllis 
Winchell, Hazel 
York, Bertha 

Mowrer, Edgar 
Moyer, Maurice 
Ogle, Guy 
Parmele, Gilbert 
Palmer, Charles 
Patten, Earl 
Pitts, Joseph 
Rollins, Dana 
Sage, Harold 
Saunders, George 
Sinclair, Raymond 
Stevenson, Raymond 
Vencill, Harold 
Young, Fred 



Girls enrolled, 41; boys enrolled, 44; total, 85, 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 107 



General Summary. 



Normal Department. ------- 891 

Grammar Grades, - - - 68 

Preparatory Class, - 40 

Practice School ( Ninth Grade, - - - 12 

Intermediate Grades, - 1"1 

Primary Grades, - 85 

Total in Practice School, - - - 306 

Grand total in Normal University, ... - 1,197 

Deduct names counted twice, - - - 41 

Whole number of different students, - - - 1,156 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 109 



Alumni Register, 

1898. 



Class of 1860. 



1. Sarah M. (Dunn) Strickler, 1413 North Nineteenth street, Phila- 

delphia, Pa. 4 years. 

2. Elizabeth J. (Mitchell) Christian, Blooming-ton, 111. 4 years. 

3. Frances A. (Peterson) Gastman. Died February 27, 1863. 2h years. 

4. Mary F. ( Washburn ) Hull. Died August 10, 1882. U years. 

5. Enoch A. Gastman, Superintendent City Schools, Decatur, 111. 

38 years. 

6. Peter Harper. Died May 30, 1887. 1 year. 

7. Silas Hayes, Los Angeles, Cal. 8 years. 

8. Joseph G. Howell. Killed at Fort Donelson. 1 year. 

9. John Hull, New Whatcomb, Wash. 30 years. 

10. Edwin Philbrook. Died February 4, 1890. 20 years. 

Class of 1861. 

11. Sophie (Christ) Gill. Died November, 1863. 11 years. 

12. Amanda O. Noyes. Died February 7, 1864. 2 years. 

13. John H. Burnham, Bloomington, 111. 1 year. 

14. Harvey J. Dutton, 808 South street, Springfield, Mo. 9 years. 

15. Aaron Gove, Denver, Col. Superintendent City Schools. 31 years. 

16. Moses I. Morgan. Died at Cleveland, O., April 10, 1895. 1 year. 

17. Henry B. Norton. Died June 22, 1885. 20 years. 

18. Peleg K. Walker, Rockford, 111. Superintendent City Schools. 

34 years. 

Class of 1862. 

19. Sarah E. Beers, Canton, 111. 20 years. 

20. Elizabeth Carleton, Superintendent Anna Brown Home for the 

Aged. Quincy, 111. 22 years. 

21. Helen F. ( Grennell ) Guild, 372 Fairfield avenue, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

14 years. 

22. Esther M. ( Sprague ) L<egg, 666 Washington Boulevard, Chicago. 

19 vears. 



Note. — The numbers at the rijrht indicate the number of years of educational 
work done since jJTaduation. 



110 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

23. Emma (Trimble) Bangs, Donnellson, 111. 12 year-, 

24. Lorenzo D. Bovee, Chetopa, Kas. 13 years. 
2'5. James F. Ridlon, Gardner, Kas. 12 years. 

26. Logan H. Roots. Died at Little Rock, Ark.. May 30, 1893. 1 year. 

Class of 1863. 

27. Mary A. Fuller. Died April, 1881. 10 years. 

28. Sarah F. ( Gove ) Baldwin, Peoria, 111. 3 years. 

29. Abbie ( Reynolds) Wilcox, Biwabik, Minn. 2 years. 

30. Sarah Hackett Stevenson, 322 North State street, Chicago. 

Physician, and Professor in Woman's College. 15 years. 

31. W. Dennis Hall, 435 Oakley avenue, Chicago. 15 years. 

32. Ebenezer D. Harris, Lincoln, Neb. 14 years. 

33. John H. Thompson. Died 1869. 3 J- years. 

Class of 1864, 

34. Harriet E. Dunn, State Normal School, Los Angeles, Cal. 333 years. 

35. Anna ( Grennell ) Hatfield, La Grange, 111. 3 years. 

36. Edith T. (Johnson) Morley, 1524 Eighth avenue. North Minneap- 

olis, Minn. 6 years. 

37. Isabella Moore. 15 years. Died Jan. 14, 1888. 

38. Harriet E. Stewart. 

39. George W. Colvin, San Bernardino, Cal. 17 years. 

40. Lyman B. Kellogg, Emporia, Kas. 7 years. 

41. Philo A. Marsh. 1 year. Died April 5, 1887. 

Class of 1865. 

42. Olinda M. (Johnson) Nichols, 198 Walnut street, Aurora. 111. 34 

years. 

43. Almena C. Jones, Canton, 111. 19 years. 

44. Lucinda (Standard) Johnson, 619 East Tenth avenue, Wiutield. Kas. 

9 years. 

45. Bandusia Wakefield, 805 Ninth street, Sioux City, Iowa. 12 years". 

46. Thomas J. Burrill, Champaig-n, 111. Professor of Horticulture, 

University of Illinois. 33 years. 

47. John W. Cook, Normal. 111. President of Illinois State Normal 

University. 33 years. 

48. William Florin, Altamont, 111. 14 years. 

49. David M. Fulwiler, 554 Seventy-ninth street, station "P," Chicago, 

111. 5 years. 

50. Oscar F. McKim, Ft. Madison, Iowa. 22 years. 

51. Adolph A. Suppiger, .^H).^ Maple avenue, St. I ouis, Mo. 

52. Melancthon Wakefield, Cherokee, la. 3$ years. 



IUJNOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. Ill 

Class of 1866, 

53. Harriet M. (Case) Morrow, 1224 North Court street, Rockford, 111. 

14 years. 

54. Martha Foster, Minneapolis, Kas. 20 years. 

55. Harriet A. Fyffe, Hastings, Neb. 10 years. 

56. Margaret (McCambridge) Hurd, 1420 Pearl street. Denver, Col. 

1 year. 

57. Mary E. Pierce, Normal, 111. 17 years. 

58. Alice (Piper) Blackburn, San Buena Ventura, Cal. 6 years. 

59. Helen M. (Plato) Wilbur, 5629 Washington avenue, Chicago, 111. 

14 years. 

60. Sarah E. ( Raymond ) Fitzwilliams, 4824 Vincennes avenue, Chicago, 

111. 26 years. 

61. Olive A. (Rider) Cotton, Chicago. 74 years. 

62. Julia E. (Standard) Frost, Pico Heights, Los Angeles. Cal. 15 

years. 

63. Nelson Case, Oswego, Kas. 1 year. 

64. Philo A. Clark, Madison, Neb. 4 years. 

65. John Ellis, Beatrice, Neb. 7 years. 

66. Joseph Hunter. Died April 17, 1880. 2 years. 

67. Richard Porter, Salina, Kas. 7 years. 

Class of 1867. 

68. Emily C. (Chandler) Hodgin, Richmond, Iud. 2 years. 

69. Emily H. (Cotton) Collins, 1400 Vermont street, Quincy, 111. 9 

years. 

70. Nellie Forman, care William C. Forman, office New York Sun 

N. Y. 6 years. 

71. Mary W. French, Decatur, 111. Assistant in High School. 30 years. 

72. Eurana G. (Gorton) Hanna, Aurora, 111. 6 years. 

73. Mary R. Gorton. Died November 15, 1878. 11 years. 

74. Mary ( Pennel ) Barber, 22 Bryant avenue, Chicago. 5 years. 

75. Onias C. Barber, Effingham, 111. 3 years. 

76. John R. Edwards. Died April, 1871. 2h years. 

77. George S. Hinman, Clearwater, Cal. 5 years. 

78. Cyrus W. Hodgin, Richmond, Ind. Professor Earlham College. 

30 years. 

79. Fred J. Seybold. Deceased. 

80. James S. Stevenson, 3127 Sheridan avenue, St. Louis. Principal 

Clay School. 31 years. 

Class of 1868. 

81. Ruth E. (Barker) Hargrove, Nashville, Tenn. 5 years. 

82. Ann E. Bullock, Normal, 111. 4 years. 



112 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

83. Jemima S. Burson, Pasadena, Cal. 5+ years. 

84. Lydia A. Burson, Pasadena, Cal. 1-M years. 

85. Etta (Dunbar) Kelso, Longmont, Col. 6 years. 

86. Anna C. Gates, 2121 Oregon avenue. Principal Grant and Gravois 

School, St. Louis. 30 years. 

87. Grace S. Hurwood, 1456 Castro street, Oakland, Cal. 23 years. 

88. Lucia ( Kingsley ) Manning-, Anderson, Ind. 7 years. 

89. Eliza A. (Pratt) Kean, New Troy, Mich. 4 years. 

90. Emma T. (Robinson) Kleckner, 1215 Jones street, Sioux City, Ia> 

2 1-5 years. 

91. Mary J. ( Smith ) Bogardus, Spring-field, 111. 1 year. 

92. Cornelia Valentine. Died June 20, 1877. 8 years. 

93. Elma Valentine. Died April 14, 1871. 2£ years. 

94. Clara E. Watts. Died June 4, 1884. 4 years. 

95. Stephen Bogardus, Springfield, 111. Principal Edwards school. 29' 

years. 

96. William A. McBane, Metropolis, 111. 3 years. 

97. Henry McCormick, Normal, 111. Vice-President and Professor of 

Geography and History, Illinois State Normal University. 30 
years. 

98. Jacob R. Rightsell, Little Rock, Ark. Superintendent City 

Schools. 22 years. 
99: William Russell. President Southland College and Normal Insti- 
tute, Southland, Ark. 27 years. 

Glass of 1869. 

100. Lizzie S. Alden, Atoka, Ind. Ty. 25 years. 

101. Melissa (Benton) Overman, Springfield, Mass. 4 years. 

102. Ella K. Briggs, 158 South Galena avenue, Freeport, 111. 23 years. 

103. Lucretia ( Davis ) Ramsey. Died 18 — . 2 years. 

104. Jane ( Pennell ) Carter, Champaign, 111. 61 years. 

105. Maria L. ( Sikes ) Nichols, 5123 Wentworth avenue, Chicago. 7 

years. 

106. Helen ( Wadleigh ) Willis, Danvers, 111. 3 years. 

107. Ben C. Allensworth, Pekin, 111. 14 years. 

10S. Alfred C. Cotton, Physician, 198 South Wood street, Chicago. 
111. 6 years. 

109. Charles H. Crandell, Batavia, 111. 22 years. 

110. Hugh R. Edwards, Oshkosh, Wis. 15 years. 

111. William R. Edwards, Tracy, Minn. 8 years. 

112. James W. Hayes, Urbana, 111. Principal Public Schools. 28 

years. 

113. Charles Howard. 



IIJJNOIS STATK NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 113 

114. Isaac F. Kleckner. Died March 4, 1891: 4 years. 

115. George G. Manning-, Anderson, Ind. 23 years. 

116. George W. Mason. Died October 8, 1887. 8 years. 

117. Charles W. Moore, Storm Lake, la. 13 years. 

118. Christopher D. Morey, Surgeon, Aurora, 111. 5 years. 

Class of 1870, 

119. Louisa C. (Allen) Gregory, "The Concord." Washington, D. C. 

9 years. 

120. Barbara Denning, Normal, 111. 18 years. 

121. Alice Emmons. Died October 2, 1871. 2 months. 

122. Clara E. Higby, 146 Park avenue, Chicago. Assistant in West 

Division High School. 25 years. 

123. Emma (Howard) Orange, Cal. 4 years. 

124. Margaret E. (Hunter) Regan, 609 Sixty-sixth street, Englewood, 

111. 4 years. 

125. Mary L. (Kimberly ) Perry, Detroit, Mich. 4 years. 

126. Mary D. LeBaron, Oneida, 111. 13 years. 

127. Letitia (Mason) Quine, 3160 Indiana avenue, Chicago, 111. 1 year. 

128. Adella (Nance) Shilton, Kewanee, 111. 3.} years. 

129. Adelaide V. Rutherford, Girard, 111. 6 years. 

130. Fannie (Smith) Cole, care of Wm. H. Wing, Elgin, 111. 12 years. 

131. Armada (Thomas) Bevan, Atlanta, 111. 7 years. 

132. Marian (Weed) Martin, Ontario Hotel, Chicago, 111. 2 years. 

133. Ben W. Baker, President Chaddock College, Quincy, 111. 9 years. 

134. Joseph Carter, Superintendent Public Schools, Champaign, 111. 

19^ years. 

135. Robert A. Childs, Hindsdale, 111. 3 years. 

136. James W. Dewell, Barry, 111. 16 years. 

137. R. Arthur Edwards, Banker, Peru, Ind. 8 years. 

138. Samuel W. Garman, Cambridge, Mass. Assistant in Agassiz's 

Museum since 1873. 2 years. 

139. John W. Gibson, Principal of Schools, Naperville, 111. 24k years. 

140. Ben Hunter, Mt. Vernon, Ind. 5 years. 

141. John W. Lummis, 2416 Webb avenue, Alameda, Cal. 18 years. 

142. John H. Parr, 3715 Langley avenue, Chicago, 111. 17 years. 

143. Levi T. Regan, 609 Sixty-sixth street, Englewood, 111. Principal 

Sherman School. 28 years. 

144. Wade H. Richardson, 602 Frederick street, Milwaukee, Wis. 12 

years. 



114 ANNUM, CATALOGUE 

Class of 1871. 

146. Charlotte C. (Blake) Myers, 315 South Vermilion street, Streator. 

111. 11 years. 

147. Isabella S. ( Houston ) Tabor, Van Hornellsville, N. Y. 4 years. 

148. Julia E. Kennedy, The Temple, Chicago, 111. 17 years. 

149. Harriet E. (Kern) Walker, 828 Fifth street, Des Moines, Iowa. 5 

years. 

150. Celestia M. Mann. Died 1887. 3 years. 

151. Frances L. Moroney, Minneapolis, Minn. 19 years. 

152. Frances L. (Rawlings) Cunningham, Princeton, 111. 4 years. 

153. Isabel (Rugg) Reed, Santa Barbara, Cal. 3 years. 

154. Frances (Shaver) Thompson, 3726 Langley avenue, Chicago, 111. 

2 years. 

155. Emma G. Strain, 418 West Broadway, Louisville, Ky. 11 years. 

156. Frances (Weyand) Latham, Will's Point, Tex. li years. 

157. William C. Griffith. Died January 13, 1892. 5 years. 

158. Henry F. Holcomb. Died October, 1871. 

159. Andrew T. Lewis, room 615 Chamber of Commerce, Portland, Ore. 

3 years. 

160. T. A. H. Norman, Martinsville, 111. 14 years. 

161. Edgar D. Plummer, Heyworth, 111. 1 year, during course. 

162. James O. Polhemus. Died August, 1879. 3i years. 

163. James R. Richardson, Tonti, 111. 19} years. 

164. R. Morris Waterman. Died October, 1871. 

165. John X. Wilson. Died at Austin, Minn., Dec. 3, 1897. 13 years. 

166. John P. Yoder. Died at Needy, Ore., June 1, 1894. 22 years. 

Class of 1872. 

167. Anna G. Bowen, 127 Loomis street, Chicago. 6 years. 

168. Martha Fleinming, City Normal School, Chicago. 26 years. 

169. Lenore Franklin, 6456 Dickey street, Chicago. 25 years. 

170. Mary C. (Furry) Talbot, Saufordville, 111. 16 years. 

171. Clara (Gaston) Forbes, Champaign, 111. 1 year. 

172. Anna M. Gladding. Died March, 1882. 4 years. 

173. Rachael M. ( Hickey ) Carr, M. D., Professor of Histology, Wo- 

man's Medical College, Chicago, 111. 10 years. 

174. Sarah C. Hunter, 615 Sixty-sixth street, Station O, Chicago, 111. 

Head Assistant Henry Clay School. 24 years. 

175. Alza ( Karr) Blount, Phenix, Ariz. 3 years. 

176. Martha G. (Knight) Adam, Normal, 111. 17 years. 

177. Julia F. (Mason) Parkinson. Died August (>, 1<S79. 3 A years. 

178. Emma A. (Monroe ) McCracken, 6400 Emerald avenue, Englewood, 

111. 15 years. 



IIvUNOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 115 

179. Julia (Moore) Byerly. Died at Urbana, 111., March 13, 1898. 1 

year. 

180. Mary V. Osburn, 2655 Washington avenue, St. Louis. 22 years. 

181. Flora ( Pennell ) Parr, 3715 Lang-ley avenue, Chicago, 111. 14 years. 

182. Alice B. Phillips, 203 Adelphi street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 3 years. 

183. Louise Ray, 313 Fourteenth street, Portland, Oregon. 10 years. 

184. Alpha Stuart, Principal Jefferson Street School, Bloomington, 

address Normal, 111. 25 years. 

185. Gertrude (Town) Beggs. Died May 15, 1888. 11 years. 

186. Edith (Ward) Roach, Watsonville, California. 10 years. 

187. Edwin F. Bacon, Normal School, Oneonta, N. Y. 23 years. 

188. Robert H. Beggs, 2427 Ogden street, Denver, Col., Principal 

Ward School. 26 years. 

189. George Blount, Phenix, Ariz. 26 years. 

190. James M. Greeley. Died 1883. 2 years. 

191. Frank W. Hullinger, Clergj-man, Farmington, 111. 6 years. 

192. Elisha W. Livingston, Capron, 111. 6 years. 

193. Thomas L. McGrath. Died , 1888. 3 years. 

194. Charles D. Mariner. 22 years. 

195. Samuel W. Paisley. Died February 3, 1878. 5 years. 

196. Frank E. Richey, Lawyer, Laclede Building, St. Louis, Mo. 3 

years. .*"*»' 

197. Espy L> Smith, M. D., 974 W. Polk street, Chicago. 7 years. 

198. John H. Stickney, Toulon, 111. Principal Public Schools. 26 

years. 

199. William R. Wallace. Died 1876. 2 years. 

200. James M. Wilson, Lincoln, Neb. 13 years. 

' 1 » 
7 S 1 " Class of 1873. 

201. Lura (Bullock) Elliott, Peoria, 111. U years. 

202. Mary M. Cox, 312 Van Ness avenue, San Francisco, Cal. 17 years. 

203. Ellen S. Edwards, Bloomington, 111. 4 years. 

204. Ida L. Foss, Chicago. 14 years. 

205. Mary L. ( Hawley ) Richardson, 602 Frederick street, Milwaukee, 

Wis. 7 years. 

206. H. Amelia (Kellogg) Bryant, 259 Seminary avenue, Chicago. 23 

years. 

207. L. Effie Peter, Topeka, Kas. 17 years. 

208. Anna V. (Sutherland) Brown. Died July 25, 1894. 7§ years. 

209. May I. Thomas, 535 West Sixty-first street, Chicago. 17 years. 

210. Emma ( Warne) Hall, Sycamore, 111. 3 years. 

211. L. P. Brigham. Died February, 1892, in Manning, la. 6 years. 

212. Charles DeGarmo, Swarthmore, Pa. President Swarthmore Col- 

lege. 22 years. 



116 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

213. Jasper F. Hayes. Pasadena, Tex. K) years. 

214. Erneis R. E. Kimbrough, Danville, 111. 1 year. 

215. George M. LeCrone, Effing-ham, 111. U years. 

216. Walter C. Lockwood. Paid tuition in full after graduation. 6 

months. 

217. Dewitt C. Roberts, Ordway, Col. 11 years. 

218. Arthur Shores, Great Falls, Mont. 3 years. 

219. John B. Stoutemeyer, Bradley, 111. 3 years. 

220. Felix B. Tait, Decatur, 111. 2 years. 

221. J. I awson Wright, Vineland, Cal. 16 years. 

Class of 1874, 

222. Emily Alden, Governess, Fontanelle, la. 15 years. 

223. I.ida ( Brown ) McMurry, Assistant Training Teacher, Illinois State 

Normal University. 17 years. 

224. Eunice Corwin, Lincoln, 111. 20 years. 

225. S. Alice Judd, Jefferson High School, Chicago, 111. 23 years. 

226. Sarah M. ( Littlefield ) Simmes, Kalama, Wash. 6 years. 

227. Mary (McWilliams) Burford, Hoopeston, 111. 4 years. 

228. M. Ella Morgan, 1207 L street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 24 

years. 

229. Elizabeth ( Peers ) Lockwood, Glendale, Ariz. Paid tuition after 

graduation. 

230. Emma (Stewart) Brown. Died August 1, 1880. 4 years. 

231. V aggie (Woodruff) Evans, I eavenworth, Kas. 2 years. 

232. I. Eddy Brown, State Secretary Y. M. C. A., 148 Madison street, 

Chicago. 6 years. 

233. Francis W. Conrad. Principal of F. St. School. San Bernardino, 

Cal. 22 years. 

234. John N. Dewell, Chapin, 111, 16 years. 

235. David S. Elliott, Superintendent of Public Schools. Red Bud, 111. 

22 years. 

236. William A. Evans, Leavenworth. Kas. Principal of High School. 

23 years. 

237. Thomas E. Jones. 9 years. 

238. William P. McMurry, Normal, 111. 1\ years. 
259. Elinzer M. Prindle, Patterson. 111. 9 years. 

240. Carlton H. Rew, M.D., Waco. Tex. 8 years. 

241. William J. Simpson, Sigel, 111. 7 years. 

242. Harry A. Smith. Clergyman. 1108 Broadway, Bay City, Mich. 4 

years. 

243. .1. X. Wilkinson, Emporia, Kas. Principal Training Department. 

State Normal School. 24 years. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 117 

Class of 1875. 

244. Margarita (McCullough) Sanders, 228 Guthrie street, Ottawa. 8 

years. 

245. Josephine McHugh, 2301 Doug-las street, Omaha, Neb. 22 years. 

246. Florence Ohr, 768 Carroll avenue, Chicago. 20 years. 

247. Henrietta Watkins, Normal, 111. 3 years. 

248. Mary A. Watkins, Normal, 111. 1 year. 

249. David Ayres, 4638 Emerald avenue, Chicago. 5 .years. 

250. Robert L. Barton, Chippewa Falls, Wis. Superintendent City 

Schools. 21i years. , 

251. Albert D. Beckhart, Clergyman, Anita, la. 4 years. 

252. Lewis O. Bryan, Van Buren, Ark. 4 years. 

253. W. T. Crow, Georgetown, 111. Principal of Schools. 9 years. 

254. James Fvllis, Welsh, la. 7 years. 

255. Judd M. Fisk, San Antonio, Tex. 6 years. 

256. Justin L. Hartwell, Dixon, 111. 13| years. 

257. Josiah P. Hodge, Alton, 111. 2 years. 

258. U. Clay McHugh. Died July 11, 1878. U years. 

259. W. S. Mills, Brooklyn, N. Y. Principal School No. 75. 18 years. 

260. James N. Mosher, Smith Center, Kas. Principal Public Schools. 

18 years. 

261. John L. Shearer, Napa City, Cal. Principal Public Schools. 23 

years. 

262. Benjamin F. Stocks, Garden City, Kas. 9 years. 

Class of 1876. 

263. Mary I. (Bass) Wallace, Delavan, 111. 9 years. 

264. Louisa C. Larrick. Died 1885. 6 } r ears. 

265. Mrs. Amanda M. Pusey, Seattle, Wash. 16 years. 

266. George H. Beatty, Decatur, 111. 12 years. 

267. Daniel S. Buterbaugh, Principal Bay Farm School, Alameda, Cal. 

19 years. 

268. William H. Chamberlin, Chicago. Teacher of Science, South 

Division High School. 21 years. 

269. A. M. Crawford, Billings, Mont. 2 years. 

270. George W. Dinsmore. Died 1882. 2 years. 

271. Lewis C. Daugherty, Principal Ward School, Rock Island, 111. 22 

years. 

272. J. Calvin Hanna, 29 South Sixth street, Columbus, O. Principal 

of South High School. 19 years. 

273. Benjamin S. Hedges. Died 1876. 

274. Charles L,. Howard, Principal Columbia School, St. Louis, Mo. 

21 years. 



IIS ANNUM, CATALOGUE 

275. John T. Johnston, Santa Barbara, Cal. 9A years. 
27(>. Claudius B. Kinyon, Professor in Med. Coll., IT. of M.; Surgeon 
in Chief Univ. Hospital, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

277. Joseph F. Lyon, Principal of Schools, Pawnee Station, Kas. 19 

years. 

278. Truman B. Mosher, Galena, Kas. Superintendent City School.-.. 

22 years. 
270. DeWitt C. Tyler, Physician, Clifton, Kas. 3 years. 

280. Leroy B. Wood, 114 Third Avenue, North Minneapolis, Minn. 

Class of 1877. 

• 

281. Mary A. Anderson, Mt. Sterling, 111. 18 years. 

282. Agnes E. ( Ball ) Thomas, Thomasville, 111. 12 years. 

283. Emma E. (Corbett) Parmelee, Normal, 111. 12 years. 

284. Nettie (Cox) Smith, Hudson, 111- 3 years. 

285. Adeline M. (Goodrich) Soule, M.D., Freeport, 111. 

286. Anna L. (Martin ) Ayers, 4637 Emerald avenue, Chicago. 3 3'ears. 

287. Selina M. (Regan) Hunter, Frankfort Station, 111. 4 years. 

288. Laura A. Varner, Santa Barbara, Cal. Principal Third Ward. 

21 years. 

289. Wilmis (Varner) Metzger, Geyserville, Cal. 4 years. 

290. Emily Wing, Eos Angeles, Cal., Bradbury Building. 3 years. 

291. Levi D. Berkstresser, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

292. W. I. Berkstresser, Clergyman, Martinsville, 111. 2 years. 

293. Richard G. Bevan, Atlanta, 111. 4± years. 

294. Edwin R. Faulkner, Texaikana, Texas. 16 years. 

295. Hiram R. Fowler, Elizabethtown, 111. 8 years. 

296. Frank B. Harcourt. New York City. 2 years. 

2 ( »7. George E. Hoffman, Lawyer, Mt. Carroll, 111. Paid tuition in full 

since graduation. 
298. Albert Snare, Milford, Neb. Principal Public Schools. 20 years. 
20 ( >. Levi Spencer, San Fernando, Cal. 14 years. 

300. Edwin R. Swett, Muskegon, Mich. 

Class of 1878. 

301. Mary M. (Baird) Burger, 727 East 5th street, Pueblo, Col. 16 

years. 

302. P. Evangeline (Candy) Mitchell, Areola, 111. 1 year. 

303. Jessie < Dexter) Wilder, Belding, Mich. 1 year. 

304. Eugenia ( Faulkner | Williams, 315 Virginia avenue, Kansas City, 

Kas. 10 years. 

305. Flora M. ( Fuller) Boyd, Messina, Cal. 9 years. 

306. Sarah G. Martin. Died at Evanston, 111., March 7, 18$). 



IUJNOIS STATE NORMA*, UNIVERSITY. 119 

307. Ida (Philbrick) Gaston. Died July 2, 1888. 

308. Frances Preston. Died May 3, 1882. 4 years. 

309. Florence A. Richardson. Died May 5, 1882. 4 years. 

310. Helen I . Wykoff, 706 N. 19th street, Omaha, Neb. Principal Ward 

School. 17 years. 

311. Osci J. Bainuni, Paxton, 111. Principal Public School. 20 years. 

312. John T. Bowles, DeKalb, 111. 18 years. 

313. Oliver P. Burger. Died June 10, 1889. 2 years. 

314. Gilbert A. Burg-ess, Monticello, 111. 9 years. 

315. A. C. Butler, Kewanee, 111. Superintendent of Schools. 20 years, 

316. Andrew W. Elder, Denver, Col. Principal Ward School. 18.4 

years. 

317. Willis C. Glidden, Physician, Beloit, Kas. Taught 3 years during 

course. 

318. C. G. Laybourn, Minneapolis, Minn. 2 years. 

319. Edwin H. Rishel, Atoka, Indian Ty. Superintendent Baptist 

Academy for Indians. 17 years. 

320. William N. Spencer, Yorba, Cal. 11 years. 

321. George I. Talbot, DeKalb, 111. 12 years. 

Class of 1879, 

322. S. Annette Bowman, Moscow, Idaho. Teacher of Drawing and 

Wood Carving in University of Idaho. 17 years. 

323. Amanda M. Crawford, Central High School, Buffalo, N. Y. 10 

years. 

324. Mary S. (Cummings) Kirk, 461 Sigel street, Decatur, 111. 2 years. 

325. Daisy (Hubbard) Pollit, Frankfort, Ky. 9 years. 

326. Harriet E. Morse, Rockford, 111. 18 years. 

327. Nettie (Porter) Powers. Died July 21, 1897. 61 years. 

328. Lizzie ( Ross ) Cook, 143 Racine avenue, Chicago, 111. 6 years. 

329. Julia (Scott) Hunting, Berea, Ky. 16 years. 

330. Emily A. ( Sherman ) Boyer, Englewood, 111. 2 years. 

331. Jennie L. ( Wood ) Holmes. Died December 5, 1891. 9 years. 

332. E. R. Boyer, Englewood, 111, 645 Sixty-second street. Teacher of 

Biology in High School. 17 years. 

333. Charles R. Cross, Superintendent of Public Schools, Oconomowoc. 

Wis. 19 years. 

334. Silas Y. Gillan, 487 Milwaukee street, Milwaukee, Wis. Editor 

Western Teacher. 17 years. 

335. Horace E. Powers, Scranton, Iowa. 

336. William C. Ramsey, Stockton, Cal. Principal Business College. 

16 years. 



120 ANNUM. CATAI.OGUK 

Class of 1880. 

337. Elizabeth Baumg-ardner. Died June 17, 1898. 16 years. 

338. Helen M. (Baxter) Brakefield, Griggsville, 111. 3 years. 

339. Lillian M. (Brown) Fairchild, Berea, Ky. 6 years. 

340. May ( Hewett) Reeder, Chicopee Falls, Mass. 1 year. 

341. Helen F. (Moore) Sanders. 4 years. 

342. Isabel (Overman) Diehl, 731 Garfield avenue, Pasadena, Cal. 10 

years. 

343. Mary E. (Parker) Bixby, McPherson, Kas. 3 years. 

344. Grace N. Weeks, Orlando, Fla. 3 years. 

345. James W. Adams, graduate student Cornell University, Ithaca, 

N. Y. 11| years. 

346. Andrew L. Anderson, Trinidad, Col. 9 years. 

347. Alpheus A. Dillon, Normal, 111. 2 years. 

348. James M. Harper, Conway Springs, Kas. 4 years. 

349. Woodman R. Marriet, M.D., Capron, 111. 4i years. 

350. Carleton E. Webster, Chicago. Principal Greenwood avenue 

School. 18 years. 

351. Edgar Wyatt, Principal of Schools, Strong City, Kas. 7 years. 

Class of 1881. 

352. Sarah A. Anderson, Virginia, 111. 14 years. 

353. Clara A. (Webster) Bowles, DeKalb, 111. 9i years. 

354. Mary R. ( Gaston ) Tear. Chicago. 4 years. 

355. Addie ( Gillan ) Estee, 1422 Wells street, Milwaukee, Wis. 2\ 

years. 

356. Mary J. (Gillan) Eastman, Calumet, Mich. 14 years. 

357. Belle Hobbs, DeKalb, 111. 17 years. 

358. Anna P. Knight, Normal, 111. | year. 

359. Helen Middlekauff, Sioux City, Iowa. 7 years, 

360. Celia S. Mills, Fairman, 111. 6 years. 

361. Carrie Rich, 1224 Henry street, Alton, 111. 16 years. 

362. Mary A. Springer. \\ years. 

363. Lizzie P. Swan, Whitewater, Wis. Librarian State Normal 

School. 10 years. 

364. William H. Bean, Blue Mound, 111. 1 year. 

365. Isaac L. Betzer, Topeka, Kas. 5 years. 

366. Elmer E. Brown. Professor of Pedagogy, University of Cali- 

fornia, Berkeley. 19 years. 

367. James B. Estee, 1422 Wells street, Milwaukee, Wis. 1 year. 

368. G. Frank Miner, Normal, 111. 12 years. 

369. Wendell F. Puckett, Wichita, Kas. 

376. Edward Shannon, Qllincy, 111. 8 years. 



TIJJNOTS STATIC NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 121 

371. Elmer E. Shinkle. Died August, 1881. 

372. John H. Tear. Died February 15, 1897. 16 years. 

373. Nathan T. Veatch, Rushville, 111. Principal Schools. 17 years. 

374. Charles B. Walter, Alton, 111. 10 years. 

Class of 1882, 

375. Mattie V. (Bean) Garwood, Blue Mound, 111. 3 years. 

376. Matilda Glanville. Died 1883. 1 year. 

377. Camilla Jenkins, Butler, 111. 8 years. 

378. Lida A. ( Kelly ) Brag- g-, 611 South Eleventh street, St. Joseph, 

Mo. 7 years. 

379. Cora (Lurton) Warwick, Nurnberg-, Stabinstrasse 7, Germany. 

3 years. 

380. Mattie B. (Maxwell) McPherson, Perry, Iowa. 12 years. 

381. Lillian W. ( Pillsbury ) Gates, 2725 North Lincoln street, Ravens- 

wood, 111. 4 years. 

382. Mattie L. Powell, 2539 Capitol avenue, Omaha, Neb. 16 years. 

383. Florence (Hubbard) Leavenworth, 215 and 216 Philadelphia Bank 

Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 4i years. 

384. Louisa M. Scott, 1140 Sherman avenue, Evanston, 111. 16 years. 

385. Lettie J. ( Smiley ) Fraser, Plainfield, 111. 3 years. 

386. Charles Fordyce. Professor of Biology, Wesleyan University, 

Lincoln, Neb. 16 years. 

387. Jesse F. Hannah, Belvidere, 111. 2£ years. 

388. James V. McHtigh, Lawyer, Minneapolis, Minn. 3 years. 

389. Murray M. Morrison, Vinton, la. 6 years. 

390. George W. Reeder, Trinidad, Col. 11 years. 

391. Milton R. Regan, M.D., Eureka Springs, Ark. 5 years. 

392. Edwin E. Rosenberry, Mt. Sterling. Died August 30, 1890. 8 years 

393. Charles N. Smith, Physician, Homer, 111. Paid tuition in full. 

394. William J. Smith. 1 year. 

395. Evens W. Thomas, Frankfort Station, 111. 2 years. 

396. Franklin L. Williams, Clay Center, Kas. 2 years. 

Class of 1883. 

397. Lou M. Allen, County Superintendent of Schools, Colorado 

Springs, Col. 12 years. 

398. Lincoln I. D. Burr, Winters, Cal. 11| years. 

399. Mae F. (Downey) Cox, Hudson, 111. 2 years. 

400. Elizabeth S. (Glanville) Houston, Polo, 111. 3 years. 

401. Nannie R. Gray. Training- Teacher, State Normal School, 

Stevens Point, Wis. 14 years. 

402. Mary E. (Hubbard) Heath, Chicago. 5 years. 

—10 



122 ANNUA!, CATAI^OGUK 

403. Caroline A. (Humphrey) Reid, Murrayville, 111, 2 years. 
4i)4. Lucy Johnson. Teacher in Kalamazoo College. 023 South street, 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 1H years. 

405. Mary E. ( Kuhn ) Kipp, Minonk, 111. 10 years. 

406. Flora A. (Lewis) Kosenberry, Normal, 111. 4Jr years. 

407. Alice ( McCormick ) Trowbridge, Bloomingtou, 111. 3 years. 

408. Martha G. (Martin ) Skewis, Marcus, la. 3 years. 

409. Hattie Paddock, 146 Garfield Boul., Chicago. 14 years. 

410. Ada Iy. Parsons, Woodstock, 111. 10 years. 

411. May M. (Parsons) Glotfelter, Atchison, Kas. 7 years. 

412. Ida M. Porter, Blooming-ton, 111. } year. 

413. Augusta E. Root, 317 Washington street, Dorchester, Mass. 10 

years. 

414. Harriet Scott, Rockford, 111. 4 years. 

415. Carrie E. ( Smith ) Turner, Mt. Sterling, 111. 4 years. 

416. S. Elouise ( Smith ) Crawford, Hamline, Minn. 1 year. 

417. Mary C. Spottswood, Rockford, 111. Principal Ward School. 15 

years. 

418. Walter T. Blake, 178 Otter street, Stockton, Cal. 

419. Frank Burr, Winters, Cal. 4 years. 

420. Andrew Engel, 9227 State street, Chicago, 111. Lilydale School. 

15 years. 

421. John Iv. Hall, Fernwood, 111. 2 years. 

422. George Howell, Scranton, Pa. Superintendent of Schools. 14 

years. 

423. J. M. Humer, Waverly, 111. 10 years. 

424. John S. Ketterman, Ida Grove, la. 5 years. 

425. William S. Lewis, 136 Merchant street, Decatur, 111. 

426. Cornelius E» Perry, Normal, 111. 7 years. 

427. Eugene W. Pinkley, Kingsburg, Cal. 11 years. 

428. Rudolph R. Reeder, Chicopee Falls, Mass. 10 years. 

429. David W. Reid, Physician, Murrayville. 6 years. 

430. Edward R. Ristine, Mt. Vernon, la. Teacher in Cornell College. 

14 years. 

431. Fred W. Smedley, Student in University of Chicago. 12 years. 

432. Charles H. Tallmadge, C, B. & N. Ry., St. Paul, Minn. Paid 

tuition in full. 1 year. 

433. John N. Wayman, Englewood, 111. Teacher in High School. 15 

years. 

Class of 1884. 

454. M. Emilia Biggs, Richard Yates School, Chicago. 15: 1 , years. 

155. Zella Campbell. Died February 25, 1892. 

136. Ella J. Caughey, 1320 Eleventh street, Seattle, Wash. lb J , years. 



IIJJNOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 123 

437. Carrie A. (Dillon) Milliken. Died December 28, 1892. 2 years. 

438. Clarissa E. Ela. Teacher of Drawing-, Illinois State Normal Uni- 

versity. 13 years. 

439. Carrie M. (Fuller) Jttdd, Dixon, 111. 4 years. 

440. Carrie A. ( Gifford ) Harvey, West Superior, Wis. 3 years. 

441. Mary M. (Hall) Husted. Private School, Blooming-ton, 111. 13 

years. 

442. Annie ( Hendron ) Smith, Mt. Carroll, 111. 9 years. 

443. Kate (Lunger) Thorp, Boston, Mass. 6 years. 

444. Harriet M. (Montgomery) McClure, Atlanta, 111. 10 years. 

445. Cora J. Walker, Dwight, 111. 3^ years. 

446. Clara A. (Whitcomb) Leaf, Salem, Kas. 6 years. 

447. Edward Aldrich, Key West, Fla. U years. 

448. David H. Chaplin, Milpilas, Cal. 11 years. 

449. William D. Edmunds, Gardner, 111. 9 years. 

450. Nathan A. Harvey, West Superior, Wis. Teacher of Science in 

Normal School. 13 years. 

451. William R. Heath, Room 1009, 100 Washington street, Chicago. 

4 years. 

452. Leander Messick, Hill City, Kas. 3 years. 

453. Orris J. Milliken, Principal of Fallon School, Chicago. 13.4 years. 

454. Austin C. Rishel, Chicago. Teacher of Science in Lake View 

High School. 13 years. 

455. Orville T. Rogers, Clergyman, Rushville, 111. 2 years. 

456. Monroe W. Utz. Died 1893. 3* years. 

457. James C. Wood, Eusk, Wyo. 

Class of 1885, 

458. M. Joice Adams, Teacher in Hig-h School, Blooming-ton, 111. 7 

years. 

459. Sue P. Adams, Normal, 111. 2 years. 

460. Eva M. ( Blanchard ) Snedaker, Box 245, Pomona, Cal. 1£ years. 

461. Helen A. Dewey, Colorado Springs, Colo. 10 years. 

462. Agnes ( Elliott ) Johnson, Ichoufu, China. 5 years. 

463. Maggie J. Grant, Sunny Hill, 111. 9 years. 

464. Ruby C. (Gray) Jordan, Chicago, 111. 3 years. 

465. Olive B. (Hubbard) Partridge, 114 South Twenty-ninth street,* 

Omaha, Neb. 9 years. 

466. Euella ( McVey ) Stafford, Maroa, 111. 4 years. 

467. Anna Reid, M.D., 918 John street, Seattle, Wash. 10 years. 

468. Katie ( Saltsman ) Collins, 1003 West Front street, Bloomington, 

111. 6 years. 

469. Helen E. ( Savage ) Rowley, Lockport, 111. 4 years. 

470. Lucy E. (Stewart) Brown, Champaign, 111. 4 years. 



124 ANNUM, CATAT.OGUK 

471. Emma ( Werley ) Hausing, Chapaca, Washing-ton. 7 years. 

472. Alexander Cation, Walla Walla, Wash. 6 years. 

473. Thornton R. Fraser. Drowned while in charge of Golconda Pub- 

lic Schools, 1885. 

474. Louis H. Galbreath. Professor of Psychology, Teachers' College, 

Buffalo, N. Y. 8 years. 

475. John H. Glotfelter, Atchison, Kas. Superintendent City Schools. 

12 years. 

47b. Charles L. Howard, Arrowsmith, 111. 4 years. 

477. Lyon Karr, Eureka, 111. 9 years. 

478. John R. Kellogg, Woodstock, 111. 9 years. 

479. Thomas B. McMurray, Divernon, 111. 8 years. 

480. John C. Mount joy, 5648 Drexel avenue, Chicago. 10 years. 

481. Cornelius S. Tarbox, Principal Wm, Penn Nixon School, Chicago. 

11 years. 

482. Oliver R. Trowbridge, Bloomington, 111. Lawyer. 4 years. 

483. John J. Wilkinson, Student in Germany. 7 years. 

484. Thomas E.'Will, President State Agricultural College, Manhat- 

tan, Kan. 9 years. 

485. Isaac H. Yoder, Wellington, 111. Principal Public Schools. 12 

years. 

Class of 1886, 

486. Septina Baker, Oakland, Cal. 6 years. 

487. Lutie A. ( Bush) Saltonstall. Died January 9, 1889. 1 year. 

488. Theodora Gildemeister, Hillsboro, 111. 11 years. 

489. Cora (Glidden) Switzer, Bristol, Pa. 6 years. 

490. Lucy D. (Gray) Gridley, Rapid City, S. D. 3 years. 

491. Saidee J. Gray, Cairo, 111. 12 years. 

402. Minnie B. (Kelley ) Howies, M.D., Joliet, 111. 5 years. 

493. Mary L. Kimball, Bloomington, 111., 507 West Locust street. 10 

years. 
404. Margaret H. J. Lampe, 619 East Chestnut street, Bloomington, 111. 

8 years. 
4 ( )5. Florence ( McVay ) Custer, Pontiac, 111. 7 years. 
400. Hattie A. Mills. Died July 15, 1890. 4 years. 
497. Mary (Piper) Anderson, Charleston, 111. 8 years. 
408. Alma E- (Ross) Belsley. Died October (», 1895. 1-J years. 

499. Olive Sattley, Springfield, 111. 11 years. 

500. May (Shinn) Giddings, Flanagan, 111. 2\ years. 

501. Eva G. (Telford ) McClurkin, Sparta, 111. 6 years. 

502. Juliet A. (Wallace) Hitt, 10616 Prospect avenue, Chicago. 111. 

') years. 

505, David W. Creekmur, 933 Marquette Bldg., Chicago, 111, 8 years, 



ILLINOIS STATE NOKMAI, UNIVERSITY. 125 

504. Levi R. Fitzer, Capron, 111. County Superintendent. 10 years. 

505. John H. Fleming-, St. Ignace, Mich. 6 years. 

506. Charles W. Hart, Woodstock, 111. Principal Public Schools. 12 

years. 

507. Robert E. Hieronymous, Los Angeles, Cal. State Normal School. 

10 years. 

508. Martin L. Mclntyre, Principal of Schools, Nokomis, 111. 10 years. 

509. Samuel D. Magers, Principal High School, Dallas, Tex. 9 years. 

510. Thomas O. Moore, Ottawa, 111. Teacher in Township High 

School. 12 years. 

511. Clarence H. Watt, 304 Forty-first street, Chicago, 111. 7 years. 

512. Walter J. Watts, Room 41, 95 Clark street, Chicago, 111. 2 years. 

Class of 1887. 

513. Jennie ( Armstrong ) Manning, Harrisburg, Ohio. 6 years. 

514. Mary E. Coffey, Oak Park, 111. 11 years. 

515. Rosalia Colburn, Eureka, 111. 74 years. 

516. Anna L. Colson, Plainfield, 111. 6 years. 

517. Martha (Crist) Kasbeer. Died January 30, 1891. 1 year. 

518. Carrie Crum, Lewiston, Idaho. 9 years. 

519. Laura L. Furman, Died at Normal, September 16, 1888. 

520. Carrie B. ( Goode ) Adams, Ithica, N. Y. 2 years. 

521. E. Margaret Hursey, Normal, 111. 

522. Cyntha A. Rutledge, 1499 Washington Boulevard, Chicago. 7 years. 

523. Flora B. Smith, 657 West Main street, Decatur, 111. 11 years. 

524. Mary J. Watt. Died . 7 years. 

525. Josepha S. E. Witte, Bushnell, 111. 4 years. 

526. Jacob S. Cline, 1494 Fulton street. Chicago. 1 year. 

527. Edwin S. Combs, Carthage, 111. 7 years. 

528. John W. Creekmur, 934 Marquette Building-, Chicago. 8 years. 

529. John H. Gray, Professor of Political Economy, N. W. University, 

Evanston, 111. 74, years. 

530. George M. Holferty, Cincinnati, O. 5 years. 

531. Joab R. Kasbeer, Denver, Col. 4 years. 

532. Thomas M. Kilbride. Principal Ward School, Spring-field, 111. 

8 years. 

533. William J. Rowson, 241 Wabash ave., Chicago, 111. 10 years. 

534. Adna T. Smith, Eureka, 111. Teacher of Music. 3 years. 

535. Almeron W. Smith, Collegiate Institute, Salt Lake City. 8 years. 

536. Amos Watkins, Clerg-yman, Los Animas, Col. 2 years. 



126 ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



Class of 1888, 



537. Maude I. Abbott, 816 East Doug-las street, Bloomlrigton, 111. 

years. 

538. Louise L. ( Babcock ) Arenschield, Eldon, Iowa. 3 years. 

539. M. Sophie Barry, Galena, 111. 2 years. 

540. Mary E. (Corson) Brown, Sparta, 111. 9 years. 

541. Sarah G. (Corson) Laird, Lanark, 111. 5 years. 

542. Ida K. ( Crouch ) Hazlett, Rico, Col. U years. 

543. Ida L. (Elkins) Stilwell, 2817 North Paulina street, Chicago, 111. 

10 years. 

544. Ella M. (Ferris) Kitfield, Denver, Col., cor. Sixteenth and Clark- 

son. 2 years, 

545. Florence M. (Gaston) Smith, Chicago, 111. 2 years. 

546. Hattie M. (Hedges) Patton, Gold Hill, Col. 2 years. 

547. Nettie S. Hunter, Flora, 111. 7 years. 

548. Hulda ( Koester ) Clark, 1251 Stout street, Denver, Col. 4 years. 

549. Emma ( Lisk ) Guthrie. Died October 4, 1891. 1 year. 

550. Lydia (Merrill) Tarbox, Mont Clare. 6 years. 

551. Emma H. Parker, Stockton, 111. 7 years. 

552. Ellen Reid, 918 John street, Seattle, Wash. 8 years. 

553. Anna M. (Smith) Brown, Divernon, 111. 5 years. 

554. Carrie V. (Smith) Stebbins, Salt Lake City. 5 years. 

555. Jessie E. (Sumner) McReynolds, Effing-ham, 111. 5 years. 

556. Mina W. Watson, Chicago. 111. 8 years. 

557. Fred Barton, Pleasant, Hill, 111. 5 years. 

558. Howard S. Brode. Teacher in Beloit College. 6 years. 

559. William N. Brown, Des Moines, Iowa. 4 years. 

560. Hanan McCarrel, Principal of Schools,. Griggsville, 111. 10 years. 

561. Anthony Middleton, Principal of Schools, Chenoa, 111. 9 years. 

562. William Miner, Superintendent of Schools, Pana, 111. 10 years. 

563. William J. Morrison, Teacher in State Normal School, Trenton, 

N. J. 7 years. 

564. Elijah Needham, Ashland, 111. Principal of Schools. 8 years. 

565. Edmand C. Parker, 715 Marion street, Oak Park, 111. 3 years. 

566. Charles F. Philbrook, Principal Public Schools, Rochelle, 111. 

10 years. 

567. Francis M. Richardson, Superintendent of Schools, Lincoln, 111. 

9^ years. 

568. Lewis Rhoton, Little Rock, Ark. 8 years. 

569. Edmund B. Smith, Teacher of Biology, 5558 Lexington Avenue, 

Chicago, 111. 8^ years. 

570. James W. Tavcner, Blooming-ton, 111. 9 years. 

571. Washington Wilson, Chico, Cal. 9 years. 



» v ILLINOIS STATE NOKMAI, UNIVERSITY. 127 

Class of 1889. 

572. M. Kate ( Big-ham ) Brode, Beloit, Wis. 4 years. 

573. Anna M. Brisbane. Died August, 1891. 2 years. 

574. Maggie H. (Brown) Aldrich, Keokuk, Iowa. 5 years. 

575. Margaret (Burns) Shry, Porterville, Cal. 3 years. 

576. Euella M. Denman. Teacher of English, Illinois Wesleyan Uni- 

versity, Bloomington, 111. 6 years. 

577. Florence (Guthrie) Hutchings, San Bernardino, Cal. 7 years. 

578. Estella E. ( Hurd ) Adams, El Paso, 111. 4 years. 

579. Elizabeth K. ( McElroy ) Rishel, Rinconada, N. M. 9 years. 

580. Cora F. Philbrook, Normal, 111. 5 years. 

581. Sara E. ( Saltzman ) Rhea, 1212 North Oak street, Bloomington, 

111. 2 years. 

582. Minnie E. Wilson, Hing Hua, China, Missionary. 34 years. 

583. William Aldrich, Keokuk, Iowa. 8 years. 

584. Sherman Cass, Principal Pubic Schools, Homer, 111. 9 years. 

585. Charles M. Fleming, Stewardson, 111. Principal of Schools. l ) 

years. 

586. Enoch A. Fritter, Normal, 111. Principal of Schools. 9 years. 

587. William J. Galbraith. Teacher of Grammar and Reading-, State 

Normal School, Whitewater, Wis. 3 years. 

588. Richard Heyward, Yorkville, 111. Principal of Schools. <S years. 

589. Albert E- Jones, Eena, 111. 7 years. 

590. George A. Weldon, Pontiac, 111. Principal of Schools. X years. 

591. Frank E. Young, Cambridge, Mass. 

Class of 1890. 

592. Julia M. Case, Earlville, 111. 3-k years. 

593. Mary R. Cleveland, Normal, 111. 5 years. 

594. Alfaretta Fisher, Aledo, 111. 8 years. 

595. N. Eee (Foley) Euce, 308 Maple avenue, Oa< Park, 111. 4 years. 

596. Minnie E. Gay, Southland, Ark. 8 years. 

597. Honor (Hubbard) Easton, Hudson, 111. 4 years. 

598. Rose W. Humphrey, Neenah, Wis. 7 years. 

599. Hattie H. Eischnewski, Chicago, 111. 

600. Alice J. Patterson, Normal, 111. 7i years. 

601. Thirza M. Pierce, Bartlett, 111. 4 years. 

602. Cora M. Porterfield, 3715 Eangley avenue, Chicago. 6 years. 

603. Margaret C. Power, Pontiac, 111. 8 years. 

604. A. Eaurie ( Renshaw ) Frazeur, Chicago, 111. 1 year. 

605. Eavina E. Roberts, Pittsfield, 111. Editor People's Advocate. 

606. Belle C. Robinson, Mont Clare, 111. U years. 

607. Alice E. Smart, Scales Mound, 111. 4 year. 



128 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

608. Maggie L. Smith. Student at Wesleyan University. Normal. 

111. 5 years. 

609. Cora E- (Snider) Irwin, Normal, 111. 

610. MaudjValentine, Normal, 111. Assistant Training Teacher, State 

Normal School. 8 years. 

611. Nellie M. Wheeler. Died March 25, 1891. 

612. Mary Lou Whitney, Austin, 111. 7 years. 

613. Ida Woods, Monmouth, 111. 5 )'ears. 

614. Emily C. ( Zigler ) Coats, Penrose, 111. 6 years. 

615. Rudolph H. H. Blome, Student in Germany. 6i years. 

616. Lyman W. Childs, 55 Arch wood avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. Paid 

tuition since graduation. 1 year. 

617. Louis B. Easton, Hudson, 111. 6 years. 

618. Emil R. Greabeiel, Elm Creek, Neb. 3 years. 

619. John W. Hall, Camargo, 111. 4 years. 

620. Lincoln E. Harris, Colorado Springs, Col. 5 years. 

621. Dudley G. Hayes, Englewood, 111. Instructor in Science in City 

Normal School. 8 years. 

622. Frank E. King. 3 years. 

623. Charles V. McReynolds, Effingham, 111. Principal Public Schools. 

8 years. 

624. Harry C. Metcalf. Student in Germany. 

625. Charles A. Perkins, Pullman, Wash. 6i years. 

626. K. Girard Whittaker, East St. Louis, 111. 5 years. 

627. Albert N. Young. Student in University of Chicago. 5 3'ears. 

Class of 1891, 

628. Trophie J. ( Amerman ) Snyder. Flora, 111. 2i years. 

629. Clara B. Bishop, Piper City, 111. 3 1-5 years. 

630. Kate E. Conover, Critic Teacher State Normal School, N. D., 

Peculiar, Mo. 7 years. 

631. Hessie (Curtis) Young, Chicago, 111. 6 years. 

632. Carrie E. (Flinn) Moreland, 484 Burnside street, Portland, Ore. 

4 years. 

633. Rebecca A. Foley, Rushville, 111. 6 years. 

634. Emma Hill, West Point, Miss. 6 years. 

635. Grace Hite, East St. Louis, 111. 7 years. 

636. Anna M. ( Kienzle ) Wheeler, 1345 Rokeby street, Chicago. 3 years 

637. Hessie A. McCann, Normal, 111. 5 years. 

638. Sara A. McGill, Austin, 111. 6 years. 

639. Edna 1 Mettler) Stowell, Hannibal, Mo. 2 years. 

640. Alice L. Raymond, Vacaville, Cal. 2 years. 

641. Maud M. Root, Los Ang-eles, Cal. 6 years. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVKKSlTV. 129 

642. Katherine G. (Spear) Hadfield, Milwaukee, Wis. 2 years. 

643. Emma ( Spurgeon ) Dixon, 5809 Jackson avenue, Chicago. 2 years. 

644. Lillian (Thompson) Tucker, Warrensburg, 111. 3 years. 

645. Lucy E. Wallace, 109 Bowen Place, Joliet, 111. Teacher in Chi- 

cago Schools. 6 years. 

646. Charles A. Armstrong-, Lincoln, 111. 5 years. 

647. John H. Cox, Educational Director Y.M.C.A., 52 E. Twenty-third 

street, New York City. 5 years. 

648. William S. Dewhirst, office Auditor for War Department, Wash- 

ing-ton, D. C. 

649. Philip H. Erbes, 627 Davis avenue, Chicago. 

650. James J. Ferguson, Chebanse, 111. Principal of Schools. 7 years. 

651. Casper G. Hanawalt, M.D., Lisbon, 111. 3 years. 

652. William D. Hawk, Colfax, 111. 4 years. 

653. Grant Karr, Student at Jena, Germany. 4 years. 

654. William H. Kring, Bloomington, 111. 1 year. 

655. Bertrand D. Parker, Jr. Principal of High School, Rockford. 111. 

5 years. 

656. James B. Pollock, Ann Arbor, Mich. 2 years. 

657. George W. Reid, Wenona, 111. Principal Public Schools. 7 years. 

658. James J. Sheppard, Head of Department of History and Civics, 

Boys' High School, New York City. Teacher in High School. 
4 years. 

659. Charles C. Wilson, 285 Barrow street, Jersey City, N. J. 4 years. 

Class of 1892. 

660. Ella M. Andrew, 350 E. Chicag-o avenue, Chicago, 111. 6 years. 

661. Ruth C. Bailer, Blooming-ton, 111. 6 years. 

662. Alma ( Boyer ) Hatch, Oak Park, 111. 

663. Eliza Breuer, Sandwich, 111. 3| years. 

664. Caroline M. Butterfield, Denver, Col. 2 years. 

665. Florence J. Clark, DeKalb, 111. 6 years. 

666. Ellen R. ( Connett ) Detweiler, 1314 S. Twenty-seventh street, 

Omaha, Neb. 3 years. 

667. Bella L. Cook, 1507 Oakdale avenue, Chicago, 111. 4 years. 

668. Etta Fordyce, Monmouth, 111. 6 years. 

669. Belinda E. (Garrison) Miller, Jerseyville, 111. 2 years. 

670. Hattie J. Gaston, Chicag-o, 111. 2 years. 

671. Cora ( Laign ) Rigby, Oak Park, 111. 2 years. 

672. Katherine E. McGorray, 877 S. Webster street. Decatur, 111. 6 

years. 

673. Mary E. Maginnis, Morgan Park, 111. 4 years. 

674. Mary Neff, Tracy, Minn. 5i years, 
—li 



130 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

075. Jessie Peasley, Bloomington, 111. 6 years. 
(.76. Phebe R. Vail. Lone Tree, 111. 3 years. 

677. Minnie Whitham, Oak Park, 111. 6 years. 

678. James E. Anient. 4 years. 

679. Frank G. Blair, Principal Franklin School, Buffalo, N. Y. 5 years. 

680. Edwin L. Boyer. Principal High School, Bloomington, 111. 6 

years. 

681. R. Olin Butterfield, Denver, Col. 3 years. 

682. Elmer W. Gavins. Assistant State Normal University, Normal, 

111. 6 years. 

683. Cary R. Colburn. Principal Broadway Hig-h School, West Supe- 

rior, Wis. 4 years. 

684. Lewis W. Colwell. Principal Linne School, 1661 N. Troy street, 

( Station G ), Chicago, 111. 4 years. 

685. S. A. D. Faris. Principal of High School, Augusta, 111. 6 years. 

686. William C. Fulton, Roanoke, 111. 1 year. 

687. G. Charles Griffiths, Principal of Grammar School, Austin, 111. 

6 years. 

688. Luther A. Hatch, Principal Ward School, Oak Park, 111. 6 years. 

689. Charles C. Herren, 306 N. Park avenue, Austin, 111. 3 years. 

690. Morris E. Killam, Tower Hill, 111. 3 years. 

691. Mack M. Lane, Hegewisch, 111. Principal Henry Clay School, 

Chicago. 6 years. 

692. John B. Moulton, Henson Park, 111. 5 years. 

693. Swen F. Parson, Principal High School, DeKalb, 111. 3 years. 

694. Royal W. Sanders, Bloomington, 111. 5 years. 

695. William J. Sutherland. Principal Public Schools, Oregon, 111. 6 

years. 

696. Benjamin F. Vaughan. Decatur, Ind. 2 years. 

697. Charles F. Watt. 3 years 

Class of 1893, 

698. Jennie Bailey, Moline, 111. 5 years. 

699. Mae Cook, Marinette, Wis. 3 years. 

7<)0. Jessie H. Cunningham, Richmond, Ind. 5 years. 

701. Nettie T. Dahl, Granville, 111. 5 years. 

702. Jude E. Davis, Rushville, 111. 3 years. 

703. Margretta Hart, May wood. I). R Cameron School, Chicago. 5 

years. 

704. Carrie P. Herndon, Morgan Park. 5 years. 

705. Lizzie I. Hilton, Maywood, 111. 5 years. 

706. Georgia J. Kimball, 111 N. Guilford street, Huntington, Ind. 3 

v<-;i rs. 



II.UNOTS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 131 

707. Marguerite (Mcelroy) Westbrook, Paxton, 111. 2 years. 

708. Sarah C. Parker, Steward, 111. 2 years. 

709. Edith S. Patten, Austin, 111. 5 years. 

710. Mary Weber, EaSalle. 5 years. 

711. Minnie S. Whitaker, Ottawa, 111. 5 years. 

712. Kate White, Brocton, 111. 5 years. 

713. Mary L. (Wilcox) Henry, Edinburgh 111. li years. 

714. Jennie R. Wrig-ht, 346 IvaSalle avenue, Chicago. 4 years. 

715. Archibald J. Alcorn. 3 years. 

716. Edward C. Backer, Ravenswood, School, Chicago. 5 3'ears. 

717. Herman J. Backer, Rose Hill School, Chicag-o. 5 years. 

718. Joseph A. Dixon. Student, University of Chicag-o. 4 years. 

719. William B. Elliot, Altona, 111. 3 years. 

720. Georg-e H. Gaston. Student University of Illinois. 1 year. 

721. William E. Goble. Principal High School, Paris, 111. 4 years. 

722. Walter S. Goode. Principal Public Schools, Palestine, 111. 5 

years. 

723. Paul E. Grabow. Principal Public Schools, Malta, 111. 5 years. 

724. James A. Hodge. Principal Public Schools, Cherry Point, 111. 4 

years. 

725. Warren Jones. Principal Public Schools, Eovington, 111. 5 years. 

726. John P. Merker. Assistant in High School, Belleville, 111. 5 

years. 

727. John D. Murphy, Normal, 111. Paid tuition in full. 

728. William S. Pierce. Teacher in Steinmann's Institute, Dixon, 111. 

5 years. 

729. William D. Scott. Principal Public Schools, Leland, 111. 5 years. 

730. Herbert C. Waddle. Principal Public Schools, Vinton, Iowa, 5 

years. 

731. William S. Wallace. Principal Public Schools, Savanna, 111. 5 

years. 

732. Henry D. Willard, 726 West Seventh street, Eos Angeles, Cal. 3 

years. 

Class of 1894. 

733. Isabella Anderson, McEean, 111. 4 years. 

734. Cora Belle (Barney) Bellows, 2147 Sherman avenue, Evanston, 

111. 1 year. 

735. Willie Bell (Butler) Francis, Huntingdon, Ind. 4 years. 

736. Augusta Elizabeth Corbin, Ehvood, 111. 1| years. 

737. Annie Ethelyn Gaylord, Plymouth, 111. 4 years. 

738. Eleanor Hampton, Austin, 111. 4 years. 

739. Eva Belle Houser, Bloomington, 111. 4 years. 



132 ANNUM, CATALOGUE 

740. Mary Josephine McCafferty, Rankin, 111. 2 years. 

741. Iyillian Samantha Nelson, Champaign, 111. 4 years. 

742. Evelyn Peltier, Chicago. 4 years. 

743. Pauline Marie Rosalie Schneider, Clintonville, Wis. 4 years. 

744. May Slocum, Evanston, 111. 4 years. 

745. Lida Jane Smith, Lexington, 111. 2 years. 

746. Rosa Waug-h, Elgin, 111. 4 years. 

747. Frederic Delos Barber. Graduate Student, University of Chicago. 

2 years. 

748. Herbert Bassett, Principal East Side School, El Paso, 111. 4 

years. 

749. Joseph Grant Brown, Assistant in Science Department State 

Normal School, Normal, 111. 4 years. 

750. Charles Dayton Coley, Graduate Student, Normal, 111. 3 years. 

751. Thomas Higdon Gentle, Canton, 111. 

752. Edward Clement Graybill, Beecher City, 111. 4 years. 

753. Albert Smith Hanna, Student in Harvard University. 

754. John Alexander Hull Keith, Student Harvard University. 2 years. 

755. Wilson Klinger, Student in Jena, Germany. 

756. Mason E. Knapp, Principal Remington School, Fort Collins. Colo. 

21 years. 

757. Benjamin Clay Moore, Principal Public Schools, Eeroy, 111. 

4 years. 

758. Frederick Gilgert Mutterer, Student University of Chicago. 2 

years. 

759. Curtis Finley Pike, Principal of Schools, Mosca, Colo. 3 years. 

760. Jacob W. Rausch, Morris, 111. 3 years. 

761. William Thomas Skinner, Principal Public School, Eoda, 111. 

4 years. 

762. Ernest Algier Thornhill, Student Harvard University. 2 years. 

763. William Wesley White, Apple River, 111. 6 months. 

Class of 1895. 

764. Fannie Bailer, Normal, 111. 

765. Mabel Winslow Barrett, Pekin, 111. 2 years. 

766. Mary Bertha Boulter, LaGrange, 111. 3 years. 

707. Martha Alice Grattan, Grand Forks, N. D. 2 years. 
70S. Phebe Hammond, Mt. Sterling, 111. 3 years. 

769. Margaret (Hanna) Haney, Dawson, 111. 1 year. 

770. Mary Emma Morgan, Keithsburg, 111. 3 years. 

771. Nellie Maria Phillips, Assistant in Practice School, State Normal 

School, Greeley, Colo. 3 years. 

772. Lfouemma Raber, Freeport, 111. 3 years. 



ITJJNOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 133 

773. Anna Barbara Schulte, Chester, 111. 2 years. 

774. Agnes Marion Smith, Chicago, 111. 3 years. 

775. Laura Mabel Thompson, Bartlett, 111. 

776. William Ross Cothern, Chicago, 111. Medical Student. 1 year. 

777. Frederick George Curtis, Principal Public Schools, Dalton Sta- 

tion, 111. 3 years. 

778. Henry Hugh Edmunds, Principal Public Schools, Atlanta. 111. 

3 years. 

779. John William Fisher, Peru, 111. 2 years. 

780. William E. Hedges, Chicago, 111. 3 years. 

781. Edward Richard Hendricks, Carpentersville, 111. 2 years. 

782. Thomas Arthur Hillyer, Superintendent of Schools, Shelbyville, 

783. Samuel B. Hursh, Principal Wallace School, Sterling, 111. 3 years. 

784. Joseph McNichols Hutchinson, Principal Public Schools, Wyom- 

ing, 111. 3 years. 

785. Granville Bond Jeffers, Supervisor of Intermediate Grades, 

Bloomington, 111. 3 years. 

786. Frank Iyindley, Paxton, 111. 2 years. 

787. Justin Jay Love, Student University of Illinois. 2 years. 

788. George Edward Marker, Principal Public Schools, Lawrenceville, 

111. 3 years. 

789. Andrew Hutton Melville, Principal Grammar Department Prac- 

tice School, Normal, 111. 3 years. 

790. Chessley Justin Posey, Principal Public Schools, Sugar Grove. 

111. 3 years. 

791. Reuben Tiffany, Principal Public Schools, Hanover, 111. 3 years. 

792. Clyde Renal Travis, Principal Public School, Manchester. 111. 1 

year. 

793. Thomas Brinton Wortman, Science Teacher, Morris, 111. I£ 

years. 

Class of 1896, 

794. Anna Belle Arbog-ast, Normal, 111. 1 year. 

795- Sadie Emma Arbogast, Normal, 111. Paid tuition. 

796. Rose Bland, Normal, 111. 2 years. 

797. Jessie Jane Bullock, Eureka, 111. 1 year. 

798. Flora Evangeline Campbell, New York City. 1 year 

799. Carrie Maria Carpenter, Henry, 111. 2 years. 

800. Lillian Chenoweth, Forrest, 111. 2 years. 

801. Eva May Chisholm, Farmer City, 111. 2 years. 

802. Lucy Maude Clanahan, Springfield, 111. £ year. 

803. Myrtle Clanahan, Springfield, 111. 2 years. 

804. Ruah Coen, Normal, 111. 



134 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

805. Daisie Delle Dickey. Kewanee, 111. 

806. Alice Irene Eldred, Gardner, 111. Paid tuition. 

807. Jessie Agnes Grainey, East St. Louis, 111. 2 years. 

808. Emma Flora Harpstrite, Decatur, 111. 2 years. 

809. Ella Mabel Harris, Moline, 111. 2 years. 

810. Jessie May Himes, Santa Fe, N. M. 2 years. 

811. Mary Florence Hobart, Glen Ellyn, 111. 2 years. 

812. Laura Helen Holly, Spring Valley, 111. 2 years. 

813. Charlotte Marguerite Kates, May wood, 111. 2 years. 

814. Ada Anna Kuhns, Bloomington, 111. 2 years. 

815. Maria Electa Moulton, Normal, 111. 1 year. 

816. Anna Carruthers Nixon, Marissa, 111. 2 years. 

817. Pearl Myrtle (Perry) Stokes, Cornell, 111. 2 years. 

818. Iva Mae Quigg, Minier, 111. 1| years. 

819. L/ela Belle ( Reid ) Barnes, 5315 Jackson avenue, Chicago. 1 year. 

820. Ada Myrtle Ruhl, Clinton, 111. 2 years. 

821. Mary Esther Sabin, Evanston, 111. 14 years. 

822. Elizabeth Taylor Schaeffer, Bloomington, 111. 2 years. 

823. Mary Minerva Steagall, Chester, 111. 2 years. 

824. Ruby L/inda Traver, Wheaton, 111. 2 years. 

825. Jesse Black, Pekin, 111. 1 year. 

826. Frank Smith Bogardus, Principal Public Schools, Metamora. 111. 

2 years. 

827. Elzy Cartwright Cavins, Principal Public Schools, Neoga, 111. 

2 years. 

828. Albert Grouse Cohagan, Principal Public Schools, Mt. Sterling, 

111. 2 years. 

829. Alan Dewain Cowan, Ipava, 111. 

830. Harry Bert Fox, Carrollton, 111. 2 years. 

831. Lewis Theron, Gallaher, Student University of Illinois. Cham- 

paign, 111. 1 year. 

832. Thomas Henry Greaves, Lerna, 111. . 2 years. 

833. Hershel Edward Kanaga, Principal High School, Pana. 111. 2 

years. 

834. William Ernest Knott, Normal, 111. 1 year. 

835. Charles Thomas Law, Principal Public Schools, Hennepin. 111. 

836. Paul Thomas Lehman, Payson, 111. 1\ years. 

837. William Herman Dietrich Meier, Principal Public Schools, Ipava, 

111. 2 years. 

838. Otto Sylvester Meyer, Principal of Schools, Lombard, 111. 2 years. 
S3') James Edward O'Neil, Bloomington, 111. 

840. John Thomas William Page, Principal of Schools, Leeds. N. D. 

2 years. 

841. Joseph Lewis Page, Niles, N. D. Paid tuition. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 135 

842. Ralph Plummer Peairs, Joliet, 111. 

843. Nelson Davidson Pike, Normal, 111. Graduate Student Illinois 

State Normal University. 1 year. 

844. Harry Brusha Price, Principal Public Schools, Franklin Grove, 

111. 2 years. 

845. Charles Aubert Pricer, Principal Public Schools, Mahomet, 111. 

2 years. 

846. Edward Percy Prince, Blooming-ton, 111. 1 year. 

847. Edward William Quick, Principal Riverdale Public Schools, 

Riverdale, 111. 2 years. 

848. Philip Harmon Shaub, Principal Public Schools, Ohio, 111. 2 years. 

849. John Arthur Strong, Principal Township High School. Biggs- 

ville, 111. 2 years. 

850. Ernest Algier Thornhill, Student Harvard University. 

851. William Jackson Whetsel, Benson, 111. 1 year. 

852. Robert Edwin Worley, Principal High School, ElPaso, 111. 2 years. 

Class of 1897. 

853. Cora Ethel Baker, Normal, 111. 

854. Estelle Katherine Baker, Belleville, 111. 

855. Harriet Bland, Normal, 111. 

856. Eva Belle Boyce, Bloomington, 111. 1 year. 

857. Mabel Anna Cooper, Ma} r wood, 111. 1 year. 

858. Gertrude Darby, Yankton, S. D. 1 year. 

859. Etta Melissa Fairfield, Bloomington, 111. 1 year. 

860. Jessie Felton, Bloomington, 111. 1 year. 

861. Grace Fenton, Danville, 111. 1 year. 

862. Mary Fletcher, Milledgeville, 111. 1 year. 

863. Elizabeth Twining Hall, Oregon, 111. 1 year. 

864. Emma Louise Lee, Bergen, Wis. ± 3 r ear. 

865. Myrtle Margaret Liggitt, Chicago, 111. 

866. Blanche Lurton, Student U. of M., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

867. Edna Belle Michaelis, Maywood, 111. 1 year. 

868. Anna T. Mitchell, Springfield, 111. 

869. Edith Belle Mize, Danville, 111. 1 year. 

870. Eva Mary Moon, Danville, 111. 1 year. 

871. Elsie Patterson, Normal, 111. Paid tuition. 

872. Alice Frances Phillips, Bluffton, Ind. 1 year. 

873. Effie Pike, Normal, 111. 1 year. 

874. Wilhelmine Rhinesmith, Mattoon, 111. 1 year. 

875. Laura Schlatterer, Sycamore, 111. 

876. Amelia Alice Sikkema, Belleville, 111. 

877. Nora Mae Simmons, Griggsville, 111. 1 year. 



136 ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

878. Bessie Bedell Stevenson, Blooming-ton, 111. 1 year. Paid tuition. 

879. Einma Washburn, Blooming-ton, 111. Paid tuition. 

880. Franklin Benjamin Carson, . 

881. John Calvin Hall, Peru, 111. 1 year. 

882. Joel Alva Harley, Superintendent Public Schools. Galena. 111. 

1 year. 

883. George Stephen Hoff, Danville, 111. 

884. George Warren Hunt, Ipava, 111. 1 year. 

885. Riley Oren Johnson, Hindsboro, 111. 

886. Fred Granville Patch. 

887. Benjamin Perry, Melvin, 111. 

888. Warren Hale Rishel, Velarde, N. M. 

889. Francis Thompson, Maywood, 111. 1 year. 

890. Martin Lewis Ullensvang, Student of University of Illinois, Cham- 

paign, 111. 

891. Winthrop Selden Welles, Principal Public Schools, Granville, 111. 

1 vear. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 137 



High School Alumni. 



ThcSe persons, except those who graduate also from the Normal Department, paid 
their luiiion in full, and are under no obligation to teach.) 

Class of 1865. 

1. Gertrude (Case) Young-, Dayton, O. Taught 9 years. 

2. Clara V. (Fell) Fyffe, Normal, 111. 

3. Charles I>. Capen, Blooming-ton, 111. I awyer. 

4. Howard C. Crist. Died 1883. 

5. Hosea Howard, St. Louis, Mo. Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific Ry. 

6. William McCambridge, Bloomington, 111. 

7. Robert McCart, Cripple Creek, Colo. Lawyer. 

Class of 1868. 

8. Anna (Ld wards) Dougherty, Peoria, 111. Taught 1.4 years. 

9. R. Arthur Edwards. See No. 137. 

Class of 1869. 

10. Gratiot Washburn. Died 1886. 

Class of 1870. 

11. Almira A. Bacon. 

12. Nellie ( Galusha ) Smith, Peoria. 111. Taught 1 year. 

13. William Burry, Chicago. Lawyer. 

14. William Duff Haynie, Chicago, Rookery Bldg. Lawyer. 

15. William Hawley Smith, Peoria, 111. Taught 4 years. County 

Superintendent 64 years. 

Class of 1871. 

16. Alice C. Chase, Chicago. 

Class of 1872. 

17. Chalmers Rayburn, Burns, Kas. Taught 6 years. 

18. Newton B. Reed, Woonsocket, South Dakota. 



138 ANNUM. CATALOGUE 



Class of 1873. 



19. M. Eouise Abraham, Chicago. Taught 9 years. 

20. Edmund J. James, Professor of Political Economy, University of 

Chicago. Taught 17 years. 

21. J. Dickey Templeton, Bloomington, 111. First National Bank. 

Class of 1874. 

22. Adele (Cook) Sample, Blooming-ton, 111. 

23. I. Eddy Brown. See No. 232. 

Class of 1875. 

24. Ann S. Wheaton, San Diego, Cal. Taught 11 years. 

25. Nicholas T. Edwards, Eos Angeles, Cal. Clergyman. Taught 1 

year. 

26. Frank W. Gove, Denver, Col. Taught 2 years. 

27. Emrick B. Hewitt. Died March, 1879. 

Class of 1876. 

28. J. Calvin Hanna. See No. 272. 

29. Arabella D. Eoer, Mexico, Mo. 

30. Charles A. McMurry, Supervisor of Practice, State Normal School, 

Normal, 111. Taught 13 years. 

Class of 1877. 

31. Sarah ( Coolidge ) Hoblit, Bloomington, 111. 

32. Jennie King-sley. Died in Denver, November, 1879. Taught 2 

years. 

33. Sabina F. (Mills) Dickey, Boulder Creek, Cal. Taught 8 years. 

34. Laura Sudduth, Normal, 111. 

35. Frank A. Blandin, Streator, 111. 

36. George A. Franklin, Faribault, Minn. Superintendent Public 

Schools. Taught 16 years. 

37. Theodore T. Hewitt, Freeport, 111. Banker. 

Class of 1878. 

38. Rachel M. ( Fell ) Treakle, Harrisonvillc, Mo. Taught 2 years. 

39. Frances Preston. See No. 308. 

40. Anna (Sudduth) Hopper. Died. September 1894. 

41. Willis C. Glidden. See No. 317. 

12. Dorus C. Hatch, Georgetown, Col. Superintendent Public Schools. 
Tii ught 5j years. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 139 

43. C. G. Eaybourn. See No. 318. 

44. Theodore W. Peers, Topeka, Kas. Physician. Taught 1 j^ear. 

Class of 1879. 

45. Fannie C. Fell, Normal, 111. Taught 5 years. 

46. Hattie ( Follette ) McNamar, Woodstock, 111. 

47. Mary (Sudduth) McCormick, Normal, 111. 

48. Silas Y. Gillan. See No. 334. 

49. Frank B. Harcourt. See No. 296. 

50. Nelson K. McCormick, Normal, 111. Physician. 

51. Frank McMurry. Dean School of Pedagogy, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Taug-ht 11 years. 

52. Oscar McMurry, 6441 Greenwood avenue, Chicago, 111. Architect. 

Taught 4 years. 

53. Thomas Williams, Eincolnville, Kas. 

Class of 1880. 

54. Helen M. (Baxter) Brakefield. See No. 338. 

55. May ( Hewett ) Reeder. See No. 340. 

56. Alice ( McCormick ) Trowbridge. See No. 407. 

57. Frances Ohr, St. Paul, Minn. 520 Cedar street. Taught 13 years. 

58. Frank L,ufkin, City of Mexico. 

59. Herbert McNulta, Chicago, 111. 

60. George K. Smith, St. Louis, Mo. 

Class of 1881. 

61. Elmer E. Brown. See No. 366. 

62. John H. Tear. See No. 372. 

Class of 1882. 

63. B. Bayliss Beecher, Memphis, Tenn. 

Class of 1883. 

64. Mary L. (Beecher) Ensley, Memphis, Tenn. Taught 3 years. 

65. Flora ( Lewis ) Rosenberry. See No. 406. 

66. Dollie A. ( McGowan ) Gharst, Riverside, Cal. Taught 8 years. 

67. Ida M. Porter. See No. 412. 

68. Eillie M. (Walker) Smith, Homer, 111. Taught 1 year. 

69. William A. Crawford, Minneapolis, Minn. 

70. Isaac B. Hammers, Panola, 111. Taught 2 years. 

71. W. Herbert Higby, Streator, 111. 



140 ANNUM, CATALOGUE 

72. Edward F. Parr, Chicago, 111. 

73. Frank H. Thorp. Teacher Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. 

5 years. 

Class of 1884, 

74. Edward Aldrich. See No. 447. 

75. Leader Messick. See No. 452. 

Class of 1885, 

76. Murray M. Morrison. See No. 389. 

77. M. Joice Adams. See No. 458. 

78. Robert H. Elder, New York City, 50 Irving place. 

79. Harry M. Loehr, Bloomington, 111. 

Class of 1886, 

80. Jessie M. Dillon. Normal, 111. 51 years. 

81. Saidee J. Gray. See No. 491. 

82. Mary L. Kimball. See No. 493. 

83. Cora M. Rowell, Fresno, Cal. 5 years. 

84. Olive Sattley. See No. 499. 

85. May ( Shinn ) Giddings. See No. 500. 

86. Juliet A. (Wallace) Hitt. See No. 502. 

87. Eee O'Neil Browne, Lawyer, Ottawa, 111. 

88. Jesse Hammers. Died December 2, 1890. 

89. Fred E. Jenkins, Principal Preparatory Department Shattuck 

School, Faribault, Minn. Taught 11 years. 

90. Harrie H. Town, Banker, Earlville, 111. 

Class of 1887, 

91. Lucy Coolidge, Decatur, 111. Teacher in High School. 6i years. 

92. Martha (Crist) Kasbeer. See No. 517. 
95. Bertha M. (Glidden) Bradt, DeKalb, 111. 

94. Alice F. (Tryner) Evans, Bloomington, 111. 

95. Jacob A. Bohrer, Bloomington, 111. 4 years. 

96. Alexander M. Cunningham. Missionary, Pekin, China. 

97. J. Robert Effinger, Jr., Professor of French of IT. of M., Ann 

Arbor, Mich. Taught 7 years. 

98. Walter H. Green, Orleans, Neb. 

99. Charles B. Harrison, Bloomington, 111. 

100. Joab R. Kasbeer. See No. 531. 

101. George M. Peairs. Physician, Morris, 111. 1 year. 
io2. Harry J. Peairs, Allegheny City, Pa. 1 year. 



ILT.INOTS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 141 

103. Leonard M. Prince. Died November 1, 1895. 

104. William F. Ryburn, Milford, 111. 

105. John A. Scott, Evanston, 111. Instructor in Greek. Taught 6 

years. 

Class of 1888. 

106. M. Sophie Barry. See No. 539. ■ 

107. Laura McCurdy, Blooming-ton, 111. 

108. Josie L. (Roberts) Bent, Oglesby, 111. 3 years. 

109. Clarence C. Carroll, Blooming-ton, 111. 

110. Dexter W. Fales, M.D., 915 L. St. N. W., Washington, D. C. 

111. Hanan McCarrell. See No. 560. 

112. Walter G. Porter, Normal, 111. 

Class of 1889, 

113. Luella M. Denman. See No. 576. 

114. Sarah L. (Saltsman) Rhea. See No. 581. 

115. Lemuel'F. Buck, Moawequa, 111. 

116. Clifford H. Coolidge, Blooming-ton, 111. 

117. Francis G. Dullam, Minneapolis, Minn. 

118. Lucian H. Gilmore. Professor, Throop Polytechnic Institute, 

Pasadena, Cal. 

119. Theodore L. Harley, Teacher in High School, Bloomington. 111. 

4 years. 

120. Joseph Manley. Teacher in Marietta College, Ohio. 5 years. 

121. Edmund B. McCormick, Assistant Professor Mechanical Engi- 

neering 1 , State College, Bozeman, Mont. 1 year. 

122. Brainard L. Spence, Oakland, Cal. 

123. Harry Weber, Washington, D.,C. 

Class of 1890. 

124. Iva M. Durham, Deaconess Home. 2978 Main street, Buffalo, N.Y. 

3 years. 

125. Annie^L. Glidden, Chicago, 2 years. 

126. Clara B. (James) Herrick, Philadelphia, Pa. 2 years. 

127. Cora M. Porterfield. See No. 602. 

128. May^( Skinner ) Parker, Rockford, 111. 

129. Kittie D. (Wright) Stillhammer, Bloomington, 111. 

130. Jesse L. Frazeur, Chicago. 4 years, 

131. Frank E. King. See No. 622. 

132. Silas Ropp, Irving Park, 111. 

133. James F. Wilson, Mt. Palatine, 111. 2 years. 



142 ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 

Class of 1891. 

134. Mellie E. Bishop, Bloomington, 111. 4 years. 

135. Grace Cheney, Blooming-ton 111. 

136. Agnes S. Cook, Assistant in Rhetoric, University of Illinois. 1 year. 

137. Rachel Crothers, Bloomington, 111. 

138. Edna (Mettler) Stowell. See No. 639. 

139. Louise M. Vickroy, 808 Holmes street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

140. George P. Burns, Williamsville, 111. 7 years. 

141. Cary R. Colburn. 3 years. See No. 6S3 

142. Philip H. Erbes. See No. 649. 

143. Charles W. Mills. 1 year. 

144. William B. Moulton, Menlo Park, Cal. 

145. Bertrand D. Parker. See No. 655. 

146. James B. Pollock. See No. 656. 

147. James J. Sheppard. See No. 658. 

148. Charles C. Wilson. See No. 659. 

Class of 1892, 

149. Grace E. Chandler, Galena, 111. 

150. Lura E. Eyestone, Normal, 111. 5 years. 

151. Enid (Gibson) Hillegas, 2536 Wabash avenue, Chicago, i year. 

152. Anna Gilbourne, Cabery, 111. 34 years. 

153. Asenath Grier, Lexington, 111. Student in University of Chi- 

cago. 3 years. 

154. Metta Huling, Bloomington, 111. 

155. Walter H. Baird, Leroy, 111. 4 years. 

156. Arthur Bassett, Normal, 111. 

157. George W. Bishop, Bloomington, 111. Teacher in High School. 

4 years. 

158. Edgar Blackburn, Helena, Mont. 

159. John B. Cleveland, Sheffield, 111. Principal of Schools. M years. 

160. Herbert S. Hicks, Rockford, 111. 

161. Samuel Holder, Bloomington, 111. 
102. Frank E. King. See No. 622. 

163. Weldon E. Porter, Normal, 111. 

164. George W. Riley, Bates House, Indianapolis, End. 

165. Walter D. Scott, Chicago, 111. 

Class of 1893. 

160. Grace I). Aldrich, Normal, 111. 
107. Nellie J. Benson, Bloomington, 111. 

168. Sarah H. Clark, Assistant in High School, Bloomington, 111. 4 
v<-;irs. 



ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY. 143 

169. Katie P. Evans, Normal, 111. 1 year. 

170. Junia M. Foster, Eongmont, Col. 

171. Mrs. Jesse Frazeur, Chicago, 111. 1 year. 

172. Nellie I. Kofoid. University of Illinois, Champaign, 111. 

173. L. May (Eeaton ) Rodman, Normal, 111. 3 years. 

174. Alice Patten, Bloomington, 111. Teacher in High School. 1 year. 

175. Bertha Rutledge, Empire, 111. 

176. Grace A. Sealey, Normal, 111. 2 years. 

177. Ethel Iv. Tryner, Bloomington, 111. 

178. William H. Arbogast, Normal, 111. 

179. James H. Forrester, Taylorville, 111. 

180. J. Philip Merker. See No. 726. 

181. Cuthbert F. Parker, Holyoke, Colo. 

182. Thomas L,. Pollock, Bloomington, 111. 

183. Elmer I. Rowell, University of California. 

184. Frank H. Wescott, Principal Public Schools, Eacon, 111. 2 years. 

Class of 1894. 

185. Effie Allspaugh, Lexington, 111. 

186. Mrs. R. O. Butterfield. See No. 664. 

187. Charlotte B. Capen, Bloomington, 111. Student of U. of C. 

188. Stella R. Eldred, Gardner, 111. 

189. Neffa B. Emerson, Bloomington, 111. 

190. Florence B. Evans, Bloomington, 111. 

191. Nellie F. Goodwin, Normal, 111. 

192. Ruth E. Moore, Farmer City, 111. 2 years. 

193. H. E. Mabel Porterfield, Normal, 111. \ year. 

194. Eunice F. Safer, Jacksonville, 111. 

195. Rosa Waugh. See No. 746. 

196. Frank P. Bachman, Teacher in High School, Decatur, 111. J year. 

197. Burl P. Baker, Principal Schools Clyde, 111. 3 years. 

198. G. Gordon Burnside, Principal of High School, Vandalia, 111. 4 

years. 

199. Alfred C. EeSourd, Topeka, 111. 4 years. 

200. Bert H. McCann, Normal, 111. 

201. Harry C. McCart, Fort Worth, Texas. 

202. Charles G. Miller, Moweaqua, 111. 

203. Frederick G. Mutterer. See No. 758. 

204. Ora M. Rhodes. Student in U. of I. 

205. Harvey S. Smith, Principal of Public Schools, Tonica. 2 years. 

206. Harry R. Spickerman, Bloomington, 111. Physician. 

207. J. William Taylor, Williamsville, 111. 

208. Daniel Thompson, Randolph, 111. 1 year. 

209. Theodore Thompson, M.D., Shelby ville, 111. 



144 AX.NTAI, CATALOGUE 



Class of 1895. 



210. Pearl L. Ballard, Normal, 111. 3 years. 

211. Blanche C. Bailer, Blooming-ton, 111. 

212. Jessie J. Bullock, Eureka, 111. 2 years. See No. 797. 

213. May M. Cavan, Minneapolis, Minn. 

214. Ruah Coen, Normal, 111. 

215. Catherine L. Cowles, Blooming"ton, 111. 

216. Emma Fry, Normal, 111. 

217. Harriett B. (Fyffe ) Richardson, Milwaukee, Wis. 

218. Daisy Garver, Blooming-ton, 111. 

219. Lou R. Hart, Gardner, 111. 

220. Eleanor (Keady ) , Normal, 111. 

221. Sallie R. Marshall, Normal, 111. 

222. Flora (Thompson) Manchester, Normal, 111. 

223. James D. Allen, Blooming-ton, 111. 

224. Fred R. Baker, Bloomington, 111. Student Williams College. 

225. Charles M. Barton, Pleasant Hill. 1 year. 

226. Claude Briggs, Minier, 111. Taught U years. 

227. John L. Cook, Normal, 111. 

228. Roy H. Dillon, Normal, 111. 

229. John T. Elliff, Pekin, 111. Deputy Circuit Clerk. 

230. George K. Foster, Normal, 111. Student I.S.N. U. 

231. William T. Kirk, Bloomington, 111. 

232. Ferdinand C. McCormick, Normal, 111. Student Medical College, 

Chicago. 

233. Fred R. McMurry, Normal, 111. 

234. Fred W. Parker. Student Dental College. Chicago. 

235. Ralph W. Parker. Student Dental College, Chicago. 

236. Thomas W. Tipton. Lieutenant U. S. Army. 



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